EducationLocalNewsPolitics/Government

Fighting for the future of Cabrini

Luchando por el futuro de Cabrini

Fighting for the future of Cabrini

Story by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“I felt appreciated,” said alum Diurka Díaz (left) of her experience at Mother Cabrini High School; her daughter Tatiana Bracht is now a student.
“I felt appreciated,” said alum Diurka Díaz (left) of her experience at Mother Cabrini High School; her daughter Tatiana Bracht is now a student.

When Diurka Díaz was 14, she moved to Washington Heights from the Dominican Republic.

A week later, she started her freshman year at Mother Cabrini High School.

Díaz was unsure of her English language skills when she started school, but under the care of her English teacher, Mrs. Clancy, Díaz soon gained confidence and a grasp of the language.

“I owe all my writing skills to her. I came straight from the Dominican Republic, and I had an accent, but I felt appreciated,” she said of her experience at the high school, from which she graduated in 1985.

Now, her daughter, Tatiana Bracht, has Mrs. Clancy as her English teacher.

Bracht entered Mother Cabrini High School this past October as a junior. When she moved to New York from Florida, her mother was adamant about her attending her alma mater.

Díaz, now a researcher at Columbia University Medical Center, explains that she felt she owes her success to the school and wanted her daughter to attend.

“[For me], it is the only Catholic institution in Washington Heights, and I know the curriculum is one of the best in the city.”

Now, a week after the school announced that it would close at the end of this school year, both mother and daughter are anxious about the future.

And they say they are angry about how the announcement was handled.

Díaz wonders why they accepted her daughter into the school in October when the administration was considering closure. She says she has no idea where to send her daughter.

“There’s no other place for [the students] to go. You can’t just close a school that’s been in the neighborhood for 115 years.”

She reported that her daughter did not take the news well after first hearing about the closure over the school’s intercom.

“You saw women pushing each other to higher levels and empowering them,” said Yaritza Rivera, who graduated in 2002.
“You saw women pushing each other to higher levels and empowering them,” said Yaritza Rivera, who graduated in 2002.

“She’s been crying since last week. They’ve all been crying. It was absolutely mishandled by the Board of Trustees,” she charged.

In Florida, Bracht had also attended a Catholic high school, but her experience at Mother Cabrini High School was an altogether different experience.

“I didn’t know girls could coexist in the same school,” she said.

Her time in Florida was not as positive.

“Everyone was ‘best friends’,” she recalled. “But anyone who disagreed or didn’t like what someone said, [there would be] a lot of negativity and nasty comments. I didn’t think real friendships existed.”

But now she has found a sisterhood.

One of her favorite classes is physics, which she has come to enjoy with the help of her classmates.

“I really struggled a lot, and some other girls saw me crying in the hallway. They gave me their numbers and tutored me.”

Many of the school’s graduates concur, saying that attending the school helped them build positive relationships with other women.

“You focus more on school, and you learn to appreciate and create a bigger bond with the women around you. You saw women pushing each other to higher levels and empowering them,” said Yaritza Rivera, who graduated in 2002.

Rivera was a sponsored student who also now works at Columbia University Medical Center. She traveled from the Yankee Stadium area every day to attend school in Washington Heights, a daily commute she looked forward to.

“It gave us a second home, that’s why the closing is affecting us so much,” she explained. “It literally felt like family.”

While some say the closing has been written on the walls for some time now, Rivera said she was surprised by the announcement.

Mother Cabrini High School, founded in 1899, is an all-girls high school which is slated to close this year.
Mother Cabrini High School, founded in 1899, is an all-girls high school which is slated to close this year.

She attended a “Breakfast with Santa” fundraiser this past December, and there was no mention then of financial woes.

“I didn’t seem like there was any imminent trouble. That’s why we were so surprised and distraught,” said Rivera. “This will really be cheating thousands of young women from the experience we had.”

Yvonne Latty, a journalist, published author, filmmaker and professor at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, said she too feels her career is a direct result of her Cabrini education.

“I can’t say that I was loving every moment of it,” she laughed. “But it gave me discipline and the teachers had a lot of respect and high expectations for us.”

“Neither of my parents had a high school education. There was a lot of poverty where I grew up,” she continued. “But my mother had a dream that my life would be much better than hers could have been, and she and my father slaved, [for my sister and I to] get a good education.”

Tuition then was $95 a month per student.

Now it is almost $1,100 a month for students paying full tuition.

For families unable to afford more expensive prep schools, and who are skeptical of the city’s public schools, parochial schools have long been an option.

Many immigrant and working families have long turned to Catholic schools to give their children a quality education.

“Children of immigrants need help and this kind of help is good help. This isn’t a welfare check, a handout; you’re giving girls a future,” affirmed Latty.

But since 2003, attendance at Catholic schools has decreased by 22 percent, according to the National Catholic Education Association. Mother Cabrini High School is no exception to this trend.

A meeting was held at the school gymnasium to strategize on fundraising initiatives. </br><i>Photo: R. Kilmer </i>
A meeting was held at the school gymnasium to strategize on fundraising initiatives.
Photo: R. Kilmer

In 2001, it had 455 students.

Enrollment has now decreased to 305 students.

Latty, who is already working on two documentaries, including one about life on a Navajo reservation in New Mexico, now wants to start working on a third documentary: about Mother Cabrini High School.

“Even if the school winds up closing, this should still be documented.”

Paul Snatchko, the school’s Director of Advancement and Communications, is not surprised by the outpouring of response from Mother Cabrini alumnae and students.

“We are humbled by the love they have for their school. We are proud of the women who are our alum. We produce strong woman leaders and we expect nothing less,” he said.

Students and alum have promised to fight the closure, and are seeking ways to reverse the decision. They have contacted local elected officials, started online petitions, and called for donations.

Snatchko confirmed that the Board of Trustees would be willing to reconsider its decision if $3 million dollars can be provided up front and another $4 million promised in the next six months.

The $7 million would be used to cover projected deficits for the coming years that will be presented by a diminished student body, as well as use for building improvements, explained Snatchko.

At a meeting held on Fri., Jan. 17 at the school gymnasium, school officials told students and alumni that they have a ten-day deadline to find $3 million, and an Indiegogo campaign was initiated, which has raised nearly $30,000 to date.

"Schools that can really make a difference for these kids are the ones being closed,” said alum Yvonne Latty.
“Schools that can really make a difference for these kids are the ones being closed,” said alum Yvonne Latty.

If sufficient funds are not raised to keep the school open, the monies will be used to help current students pay for tuition at other schools.

Students and alumni have cast as wide a net as possible, reaching out to deep-pocked celebrities associated with Catholic schools, and even Pope Francis.

Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez was present at Friday’s meeting, as were representatives from the offices of State Senator Adriano Espaillat and Assemblymember Denny Farrell.

The elected officials agreed that the institution should be kept open, but said they would not be able to allocate city or state resources to the Catholic school in light of the separation between church and state.

But it seemed that those best disposed to help the school were those closest to it. It was students, former and present, who spoke avidly of various fundraising tactics, from bake sales to contacting Lady Gaga, who also went to an all-girls Catholic school.

“Schools that can really make a difference for these kids are the ones being closed,” argued Latty. “These are the girls who are going to make a contribution to the city, to the world.”

To donate funds and for more information, please visit http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/save-mother-cabrini-high-school.

Luchando por el futuro de Cabrini

Historia por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“Me sentí apreciada", dijo Diurka Díaz (izq.) de su experiencia en la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini; su hija Tatiana Bracht es una estudiante.
“Me sentí apreciada”, dijo Diurka Díaz (izq.) de su experiencia en la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini; su hija Tatiana Bracht es una estudiante.

Cuando Diurka Díaz tenía 14 años, se mudó a Washington Heights de la República Dominicana.

Una semana más tarde, comenzó su primer año de estudios en la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini.

Díaz estaba insegura de sus habilidades del idioma inglés cuando empezó la escuela, pero bajo el cuidado de su maestra de inglés, la señora Clancy, rápidamente Díaz ganó confianza y una comprensión de la lengua.

“Le debo todas mis habilidades de escritura a ella. Vine directamente desde la República Dominicana, y tenía un acento, pero me sentí apreciada”, dijo de su experiencia en la escuela secundaria, de donde se graduó en 1985.

Ahora, su hija, Tatiana Bracht, tiene a la señora Clancy como su maestra de inglés.

Bracht entró a la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini el pasado octubre en tercer año. Cuando se mudó a Nueva York desde Florida, su madre se mantuvo firme sobre que asistiera a su alma mater.

Díaz, actualmente investigadora en el centro médico de la Universidad Columbia, dijo que le debe su éxito a la escuela, y quería que su hija asistiera.

“[Para mí], es la única institución católica en Washington Heights y sé que el plan de estudios es uno de los mejores de la ciudad”.

Ahora, una semana después de que la escuela anunciara que cerraría al final del año escolar, la madre y la hija están preocupadas por el futuro.

Y dicen que también están molestas por cómo se manejó el anuncio.

Díaz se pregunta por qué aceptaron a su hija en la escuela en octubre cuando la administración estaba considerando el cierre. Y ahora ella no tiene idea de dónde enviar a su hija.

“No hay otro lugar para que [los estudiantes] asistan. No se puede simplemente cerrar una escuela que ha estado en el barrio por 115 años”.

Informó que Bracht no tomó bien la noticia tras escuchar sobre el cierre por el intercomunicador de la escuela.

“Viste a las mujeres retándose unas a otras a niveles más altos y empoderándose", dijo Yaritza Rivera, quien se graduó en el año 2002.
“Viste a las mujeres retándose unas a otras a niveles más altos y empoderándose”, dijo Yaritza Rivera, quien se graduó en el año 2002.

“Ha estado llorando desde la semana pasada. Todos ellos han estado llorando. Fue absolutamente mal manejado por el consejo de administración”, comentó.

Bracht también asistía a una escuela secundaria católica en Florida, pero su experiencia en la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini ha sido un cambio de vida.

“No sabía que las niñas podían coexistir en la misma escuela”, dijo ella.

Su experiencia en Florida no fue tan positiva.

“Todo el mundo era ‘mejores amigos’, pero si alguien no estaba de acuerdo o no le gustaba lo que decía otra persona, [habría] mucha negatividad y comentarios desagradables. No pensé que existieran las verdaderas amistades”.

Pero ahora ha encontrado una hermandad.

Una de sus clases favoritas es física, la cual ha llegado a disfrutar con la ayuda de sus compañeros de clase.

“Realmente me esforcé mucho, y algunas otras chicas me vieron llorando en el pasillo. Me dieron sus números y me ayudaron”.

Muchas de las graduadas de la escuela han dicho que la experiencia de asistir a Madre Cabrini les ayudó a construir relaciones positivas con otras mujeres jóvenes.

“Te concentras más en la escuela, y aprendes a apreciar y a crear un vínculo más grande con las mujeres que le rodean. Viste a las mujeres retándose unas a otras a niveles más altos y empoderándose”, dijo Yaritza Rivera, quien se graduó en el año 2002.

Rivera era una estudiante financiada que ahora trabaja en el centro médico de la Universidad de Columbia. Ella viajaba desde la zona del estadio Yankee todos los días para asistir a la escuela en Washington Heights, pero el viaje a Madre Cabrini era algo que esperaba con interés.

“Nos dio una segunda casa, es por eso que el cierre nos está afectando mucho. La sentimos, literalmente, como de la familia”.

Aunque algunos dicen que el cierre de la escuela se percibía desde hace algún tiempo, Rivera se mostró sorprendida por el anuncio.

La escuela Madre Cabrini, fundada en el 1899, está programado para cerrar este año.
La escuela Madre Cabrini, fundada en el 1899, está programado para cerrar este año.

Ella asistió a un desayuno con Santa para recaudar fondos en diciembre y no hubo ninguna mención de los problemas financieros.

“No parecía como si no hubiera ningún problema inminente, por eso nos quedamos tan sorprendidos y consternados. Esto realmente va a engañar a miles de mujeres jóvenes a partir de la experiencia que tuvimos”, dijo Rivera.

Yvonne Latty, periodista, autora publicada, cineasta y profesora del Instituto de Periodismo Arthur L. Carter de la Universidad de Nueva York, dijo que le debe su carrera a la educación que recibió en la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini.

“No puedo decir que disfruté cada momento pero me dio disciplina, y los maestros tenían mucho respeto y altas expectativas para nosotras”, dijo.

“Ninguno de mis padres tuvo una educación secundaria y había mucha pobreza donde crecí, pero mi madre tuvo el sueño de que mi vida fuese mucho mejor de lo que pudo haber sido la suya, y ella y mi padre se esclavizaron para que mi hermana y yo pudiéramos recibir una buena educación”.

La matrícula en ese entonces era de $95 dólares por mes. Ahora es de casi $1,100 mensual para los estudiantes que pagan la matrícula completa. Para las familias que no pueden pagar colegios privados más caros, y los que son escépticos de las escuelas públicas de la ciudad, las escuelas parroquiales han sido durante mucho tiempo una opción.

Muchos inmigrantes y familias trabajadoras dependen de las escuelas católicas para dar a sus hijos una educación de calidad.

“Los hijos de inmigrantes necesitan ayuda y este tipo de apoyo es bueno. Esto no es un cheque de asistencia social, una limosna; usted está dando un futuro a las niñas”, dijo Latty.

Una reunión para planificar como recaudar fondos fue celebrada. </br><i>Foto: R. Kilmer</i>
Una reunión para planificar como recaudar fondos fue celebrada.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Pero a pesar de sus cualidades, desde el año 2003 la asistencia a los colegios católicos ha disminuido en un 22 por ciento, según la Asociación Nacional de Educación Católica. La escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini no es una excepción a esta tendencia. En 2001, tenía 455 estudiantes y ahora la matrícula ha disminuido a 305 estudiantes.

Latty, quien está trabajando en dos documentales -entre ellos uno sobre la vida en una reservación Navajo en Nuevo México- ahora quiere empezar a trabajar en un documental sobre la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini.

“Incluso si la escuela termina cerrando, esto debe ser documentado”.

Paul Snatchko, director de la escuela de Adelanto y Comunicaciones, no está sorprendido por la efusiva respuesta de las ex alumnas de Madre Cabrini.

“Nos honra el amor que tienen por su escuela. Estamos orgullosos de las mujeres que son nuestras ex alumnas. Producimos mujeres fuertes y líderes y no esperamos nada menos”, dijo.

Los estudiantes y ex alumnas se han comprometido a luchar contra el cierre y están buscando encontrar la manera de revertir la decisión, poniéndose en contacto con los funcionarios electos locales, comenzando peticiones en línea y pidiendo donaciones.

Snatchko confirmó que la Junta de Administración estaría dispuesta a reconsiderar su decisión en caso de que $3 millones de dólares fuesen proporcionados por adelantado y otros $4 millones fuesen prometidos en los próximos seis meses.

Los $7 millones se utilizarían para cubrir los déficits proyectados para los próximos años, que serán presentados por un cuerpo estudiantil disminuido, también se utilizarían para mejoras a la construcción, explicó Snatchko.

En una reunión de ex alumnas celebrada el viernes 17 de enero, funcionarios de la escuela dijeron a las ex alumnas que tienen un plazo de diez días para encontrar $3 millones, y la coalición decidió iniciar una campaña Indiegogo.

"Las escuelas que realmente pueden hacer una diferencia para estas niñas son las que están siendo cerradas", dijo Yvonne Latty.
“Las escuelas que realmente pueden hacer una diferencia para estas niñas son las que están siendo cerradas”, dijo Yvonne Latty.

Si no se reciben fondos suficientes para mantener la escuela abierta, entonces el dinero será utilizado para ayudar a los estudiantes actuales a pagar la matrícula en otras escuelas.

En un esfuerzo por salvar a la escuela secundaria Madre Cabrini, los alumnos y ex alumnas planean lanzar una amplia red, llegar a los funcionarios locales electos, celebridades adineradas e incluso el Papa Francisco.

El concejal Ydanis Rodríguez estuvo presente en la reunión, así como los representantes de las oficinas del senador estatal Adriano Espaillat y el asambleísta Denny Farrell.

Los funcionarios electos se ofrecieron a apoyarlos como mejor pudieran, pero dijeron que no serían capaces de asignar recursos de la ciudad o el estado para la escuela católica, debido a la separación de iglesia y estado.

Pero parecía que los que estaban dispuestos a ayudar a la escuela eran los más cercanos a ella. Estudiantes, ex alumnas y padres hicieron una lluvia de ideas para diversas tácticas de recaudación de fondos, desde tener ventas de pasteles hasta acercarse a Lady Gaga, quien también asistió a una escuela católica para niñas.

“Las escuelas que realmente pueden hacer una diferencia para estas niñas son las que están siendo cerradas”, argumentó Latty. “Estas son las chicas que van a hacer una contribución a la ciudad, al mundo”.

Para donar fondos y para obtener más información, por favor visite http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/save-mother-cabrini-high-school.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker