“A New Play”: Looking close, finding self, making art
“A New Play”: Mirando de cerca, encontrándose a si mismo, haciendo arte

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“A New Play”: Looking close, finding self, making art

Story and photos by Sandra E. García

David Moreira, in his first solo exhibit in New York, stands besides his painting ‘I still don’t name it,’ which reminds him of his cat Bluebeans.

David Moreira, in his first solo exhibit in New York, stands besides his painting ‘I still don’t name it,’ which reminds him of his cat Bluebeans.

The right painting, it’s been said, can brighten up a room.

At the Russ Berrie Pavilion on St. Nicholas Avenue, the entire length of the building’s front lobby is alight, thanks to an installation of new paintings by artist David Moreira.

Moreira hails from California.

He made his way to Washington Heights by way of Chicago 6 years ago.

In “New Play,” his first New York City solo exhibition, the young artist said he sought to represent some of the many influences and interests that surround him.

“I’m a bit of a bull, and the world can sometimes turn into a small china room for me,” said Moreira.

The young artist, who studied art at San Jose State and at the Art Institute of Chicago, looks to reveal different factions of his life through his canvas.

“Life is so complex: emotional, political, spiritual.  My art practice is how I make sense of my self and the world,” said Moreira. “It gives me orientation, [and] keeps me tethered, like a saddle on a wild horse.”

These paintings were first produced on a stretch of fabric and are later framed over an irregularly cut piece of wood and stapled onto it.

“Ultimately I’m after a sense of particular self,” explained Moreira. “I have my own unique nature and that also has a place in the world to be.”

Moreira’s “Painful and pleasant in turns,” offers both an immediate recognition of a butterfly, but also represents a labyrinth.

Moreira’s “Painful and pleasant in turns,” offers both an immediate recognition of a butterfly, but also represents a labyrinth.

In pursuit of this sense of self, Moreira works within visual presentations that are spare and vivid at once, with details and irregularities observed in various spots and drips of paint that are plainly visible. There are recognizable forms, such as butterflies, and in other instances, the paintings are far more abstract.

“I set up these tasks that are kind of simple and open and they go their own way,” said Moreira. “There is something kind of special about the way [this] lets the material start to express themselves. There’s something special about the irregularities.”

Moreira has created this unique technique, as it expresses need to find a place to be. While the free-form style of the fabric paintings reveals spiritedness, it is harnessed onto the support provided by the frames.

“The expression in these supports, that very literally support the painting, give the art a place to be,” said Moreira pensively.

The exhibit has pointed up significant connections for Moreira to his new home in northern Manhattan.

That the Berrie Pavilion serves as the Department of Genetics and Development for Columbia University was not missed by the artist.

The Russ Berrie Pavilion will host “A New Play” until late July.

The Russ Berrie Pavilion will host “A New Play” until late July.

“Healing has been a theme in my work, also transformation,” said Moreira, who also conducted research on entrepreneur and philanthropist Russ Berrie.

“I learned that he was a very kind generous man that made his fortune making stuffed animals,” said Moreira of the Bronx native Berrie who started his teddy-bear-making business from the ground up in the 1950’s.

By the 70’s, the business had grown to over $6 million dollars in profit.

Berrie set an equally high bar through his foundation, seeking out causes and leaders that worked to, among other things, find a cure to diabetes, advance humanism in medicine, and foster a deeper appreciation for the arts.

For those for whom the Pavilion is an everyday destination, the art brings a welcome visual “pop” and a burst of different energy.

“I think this is very cool. It’s a great way to show emerging artists’ work,” offered Tony Brown, who daily works at the Berrie Pavilion. “And it’s a great venue.”

Brown added, “When they took the last show down it had not been down for 20 minutes and everyone noticed. People miss it; they like seeing art.”

Moreira is grateful for the opportunity to have impact locally.

“Columbia does something very important here for contemporary art in Northern Manhattan,” he said. “There are real artists here and this is one of very few venues in the area to experience the art.”

Moreira’s paintings are first produced on a stretch of fabric and are later framed over an irregularly cut piece of wood.

Moreira’s paintings are first produced on a stretch of fabric and are later framed over an irregularly cut piece of wood.

And he sees this new exhibit as one more step in an evolving journey into and outside of himself as an artist.

“I think of animals and they are all unique,” said Moreira. “Everyone will recognize a leopard but each one will have totally different spots, so it’s kind of like I have my own spots.”

The “New Play” exhibit closes on July 31st 2012.

For more information on David Moreira, please visit www.davidboydleemoreira.blogspot.com

 

“A New Play”: Mirando de cerca, encontrándose a si mismo, haciendo arte

Historia y fotos por Sandra E. García

David Moreira, in his first solo exhibit in New York, stands besides his painting ‘I still don’t name it,’ which reminds him of his cat Bluebeans.

David Moreira, en su primera exhibición individual en Nueva York, parado junto a su pintura ‘I still don’t name it’, lo cual le recuerda su gato Bluebeans.

Se dice que la pintura correcta, puede iluminar un cuarto.

En el Pabellón Russ Berrie en la Avenida St. Nicholas, el frente del vestíbulo del edificio completo está iluminado, gracias a la instalación de nuevas pinturas del artista David Moreira. Moreira viene de California.

Llegó a Washington Heights desde Chicago en el 2006.

En “New Play”, su primera exhibición individual en la ciudad de Nueva York, el joven artista dijo que buscó representar algunas de las muchas influencias e intereses que le  rodean.

“Yo soy un poco tosco y algunas veces el mundo se puede convertir en un pequeño salón de porcelana para mi”, dijo Moreira.

El joven artista, quien estudio arte en San Jose State y en el Instituto de Arte de Chicago, busca revelar diferentes facciones de su vida a través de su lienzo.

“La vida es tan compleja: emotiva, política, espiritual. Mi práctica de las artes es como hago sentido de mi y el mundo”, dijo Moreira. “Me brinda orientación, y me mantiene atado, como una silla de montar en un caballo salvaje. Finalmente busco un sentido auto particular. Tengo mi propia naturaleza única y eso también tiene un lugar en el mundo”.

Estas pinturas primero fueron producidas en un pedazo de tela y luego fueron enmarcadas sobre un pedazo de madera irregular y grapados.

El trabajo es repuesto y vivido a la vez, con detalle e irregularidades en varios puntos y gotas de pintura que son claramente visibles. Hay formas reconocibles, tales como mariposas y en otros casos, las pinturas son mucho más abstractas.

“Establecí estas tareas que son algo simples y abiertas, y ellas van por su propio camino”, dijo Moreira. “Hay algo como especial acerca de la manera que esto dejar que el material comience a expresarse el mismo. Hay algo especial acerca de las irregularidades”.

Moreira ha creado esta técnica única, mientras expresa la necesidad de encontrar un lugar donde estar.

Aunque el estilo de forma libre de las pinturas en tela revela animación, es aprovechada por el apoyo provisto por los marcos.

Moreira’s “Painful and pleasant in turns,” offers both an immediate recognition of a butterfly, but also represents a labyrinth.

La pieza favorita de Tony Bronx de la exhibición de Moreira es “Painful and pleasant in turns”. “Porque hace algo visual, toma un poco de tiempo para darse cuenta que es un laberinto”.

“La expresión en este apoyo, que bien literalmente apoyo la pintura, le brinda al arte un lugar donde estar”, dijo Moreira pensativamente.

La exhibición ha señalado significativas conexiones para Moreira a su nuevo hogar en el Norte de Manhattan.

El Pabellón Berrie sirve como el Departamento de Genética y Desarrollo de la Universidad Columbia, y que no se perdió por el artista.

“El sanar ha sido un tema en mi trabajo, también transformación”, dijo Moreira, quien también investigó Russ Berrie.

“Aprendí que fue un hombre muy generoso que hizo su fortuna haciendo peluches”, dijo Moreira del nativo del Bronx Berrie, quien comenzó su negocio de hacer peluches muy humildemente desde el 1950.

En los 70, el negocio había crecido en más de $6 millones de dólares en ganancias.

Berrie tambien era un activo filantrópico.

Para aquellos quienes el Pabellón es un destino de todos los días, el arte les da una bienvenida visual y una energía diferente.

“Pienso que esto es bien bueno. Es una gran manera de mostrar el trabajo de artistas emergiendo”, dijo Tony Bronx, quien trabaja en el Pabellón Berrie. “Y es un gran lugar”.

Brown añadió, “Cuando se llevo a cabo la última exhibición no había estado fuera por 20 minutos y todo el mundo se dio cuenta. La gente la extraña; les gusta ver arte”.

Moreira está agradecido por la oportunidad de tener impacto localmente.

“Columbia hace algo muy importante aquí por el arte contemporáneo en el Norte de Manhattan”, dijo el.  “Aquí hay artistas reales y esta es uno de los pocos lugares en el área para experimentar el arte”.

Y el ve esta exhibición como un paso más hacia un viaje evolutivo y fuera de si como artista”.

“Yo pienso en los animales y ellos todos son únicos”, dijo Moreira. “Todo el mundo reconoce un leopardo pero todos tienen diferentes manchas, así es que algo como que yo tengo mis propias manchas”.

La exhibición “New Play” cierra el 31 de julio de 2012.

Para más información de David Moreira, favor de visitar www.davidboydleemoreira.blogspot.com