At sixteen, still striking back
A los dieciséis años, sigue contraatacando

  • English
  • Español

At sixteen, still striking back

Anti-violence program marks milestone

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

“[The] group is like my family,” says program participant Virgilia Figueroa.

“[The] group is like my family,” says program participant Virgilia Figueroa.

Virgilia Figueroa sells cosmetics and jewelry.

Like any businesswoman, she knows if she looks good, people will buy her products.

But her husband began to object to the way she looked when she left for work.

And he told her so.

“He wasn’t always like that,” she said. Still, six months into her marriage, things took a turn for the worse.

“He started to become more violent,” she said. “He changed.”

He yelled at her. Then he started threatening her. She avoided him when he came home from work. When he started shoving her, Figueroa knew the situation wasn’t going to get better.

But Figueroa was terrified. She knew that even if she changed and did what her husband wanted, he would still be a tyrant. After a year and a half of marriage, she left and moved into a women’s shelter. As an undocumented immigrant living in New York, she thought she didn’t have a lot of options.

The Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn Anti-Domestic Violence Program turns sixteen.

The Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn Anti-Domestic Violence Program turns sixteen.

That was four years ago.

Today, Figueroa, 48, still sells cosmetics and jewelry. But she’s not involved in an abusive relationship.

She has a green card and is on track to becoming a U.S. citizen. She’s also in the process of bringing her children from the Dominican Republic to live with her in the United States.

She is one of the thousands of women who’ve benefitted from the Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn Anti-Domestic Violence Program at the Dominican Women’s Development Center.

For 16 years, the program has provided a safe space in the uptown community where women can get emotional support. In addition to a 24-hour hotline, the program’s staff members also offer individual and group counseling. They assist in immigration issues. They also help women navigate family and criminal courts.

“Our program is very comprehensive,” said Rosita Romero, Co-Founder and President of the organization.  “We aren’t lawyers, but we help get women orders of protection.”

A significant part of its program is leadership empowerment training, said Karina Aybar-Jacobs, Director of the Anti-Violence Program. Women who’ve been through counseling after an abusive relationship help other women.

DWDC programs are held at Bethania Alvarado’s beauty salon on West 177th Street.

DWDC programs are held at Bethania Alvarado’s beauty salon on West 177th Street.

“They accompany women to court or help them get services that they might not otherwise seek because they are new immigrants or lack mastery of the English language,” she said.

Women can benefit from the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA, which provides legal aid and protection to people evicted from their homes due to circumstances around domestic violence or stalking. The act also provides services to undocumented women.

“About 75 to 80 percent of the women we serve are undocumented,” said Aybar-Jacobs. “Their legal status is not a barrier for them to receive services. They will not be deported.”

The culture shock that immigrants to the U.S. face is a big topic for discussion in their workshops, said Aybar-Jacobs. Men sometimes feel their wives and girlfriends act differently than they would back home. “They feel emasculated—their male image is diminished by the way women behave here,” she said.

“Our program is very comprehensive,” said Rosita Romero, Co-Founder and President of the Dominican Women’s Development Center (DWDC), here seated in red blouse with the organization’s staff.

“Our program is very comprehensive,” said Rosita Romero, Co-Founder and President of the Dominican Women’s Development Center (DWDC), here seated in red blouse with the organization’s staff.

“Domestic violence is a dynamic of power and control,” said Romero. “Part of the dynamic is who has the power in the relationship.”

Not all of the women face severe and life-threatening scenarios. Some women choose to stay in relationships, especially if the batterer admits he’s been abusive and seeks help.

Some women don’t see themselves as a victim of abuse. Sometimes, women will even initiate violence and don’t see it as abuse—it’s just fighting.

When women are the first to hit, men sometimes retaliate. But they do it with a much greater force. “It’s a way of saying: I’m putting my foot down as a man and I’m going to control you,” Romero said.

“We tend to see it in younger couples where they both hit and both are physically abusive. Then it’s harder to define abuse,” said Aybar-Jacobs.

It might be natural to fight back in self-defense, but violence isn’t resolved with more violence, she said.

“What we recommend is you remove yourself from the violent situation. Go to the nearest precinct or call 911,” she said. “Then call our hotline and get emotional support.”

The organization will honor Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence.

The organization will honor Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence.

A lot of the discussion in group counseling focuses on how to recognize abuse. “Usually the women who go there for the first time are a little disoriented,” Figueroa said. New women are often depressed and don’t have a vision for their future.

“It’s important for women to be more stable, and understand that there is more help out there for domestic violence and immigration issues,” she added.

The Dominican Women’s Development Center, also known as “El Centro,” helps women of all ethnicities and races. Aybar-Jacobs said Hispanic as well as white, African-American and Asian women ask for help. In fact, many Asian women seek out their services because they fear being ostracized in their own communities, she said.

The Center also holds workshops at beauty parlors, schools and churches throughout Northern Manhattan and the Bronx. “Community education is a very important part of the program,” said Romero.

One such workshop was held at Bethania Alvarado’s beauty salon on West 177th Street, just west of Broadway. On the salon’s busiest days, more than 60 women have their hair styled, cut or colored there, said stylist Dayaira Nuñez.

Honoree Adriano Espaillat, State Senator.

Honoree Adriano Espaillat, State Senator.

“We are open to letting our customers talk about domestic violence,” explained Alvarado. “In the Dominican Republic, there are a lot of women getting killed because of this.”

Figueroa heard about the program from Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez’s office. For the past four years, she’s regularly attended both group and individual counseling sessions.

“That group is like my family,” she said. “It changed everything.”

 

The Dominican Women’s Development Center’s Hotline Number is 212.568.6616.

The Dominican Women’s Development Center is celebrating its 16th anniversary on Thurs., July 31st from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Pediatrics 2000 at 3332 Broadway. Among the honorees are Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence (OCDV); Grace Pérez,Former Executive Director of the Violence Intervention Program; Mildred Valdéz, Counselor/Advocate of the Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn Program; and State Senator Adriano Espaillat.

Tickets can be purchased at www.dwdc.org. Please call or email Bernadette García at 212.568.6616 /bgarcia@dwdc.org for more information. 

 

A los dieciséis años, sigue contraatacando

Programa contra la violencia marca hito

Historia y fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

The Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn Anti-Domestic Violence Program turns sixteen.

El programa contra la violencia doméstica Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn cumple 16 años.

Virgilia Figueroa vende cosméticos y joyas.

Como cualquier mujer de negocios, sabe si ella se ve bien, la gente va a comprar sus productos.

Pero su marido comenzó a oponerse a su aspecto cuando ella se iba a trabajar.

Y se lo dijo.

“No siempre fue así”, dijo. Sin embargo, a seis meses de su matrimonio, las cosas tomaron un giro terrible.

“Él comenzó a ser más violento”, dijo. “Cambió”.

Le gritaba. Luego empezó a amenazarla. Ella lo evitaba cuando llegaba a casa del trabajo. Cuando empezó a empujarla, Figueroa sabía que la situación no iba a mejorar.

Pero Figueroa estaba aterrorizada. Sabía que incluso si ella cambiaba y hacía lo que quería su marido, él igual sería un tirano. Después de un año y medio de matrimonio, lo dejó y se mudó a un refugio para mujeres. Como inmigrante indocumentada viviendo en Nueva York, pensó que no tenía muchas opciones.

Eso fue hace cuatro años.

Hoy, Figueroa, de 48 años, sigue vendiendo cosméticos y joyas. Pero no está involucrada en una relación abusiva.

“[The] group is like my family,” says program participant Virgilia Figueroa.

“El grupo es como mi familia”, dice la participante del programa, Virgilia Figueroa.

Ella tiene una green card y está en camino de convertirse en una ciudadana de los Estados Unidos. También está en el proceso de llevar a sus hijos de la República Dominicana a vivir con ella en los Estados Unidos.

Ella es una de las miles de mujeres que han beneficiados del programa Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn, un programa de Lucha contra la Violencia Doméstica del Centro de Desarrollo para las Mujeres Dominicanas.

Durante 16 años, el programa ha proporcionado un espacio seguro en la comunidad del norte del condado, donde las mujeres pueden recibir apoyo emocional. Además de una línea directa de 24 horas, los miembros del personal del programa también ofrecen asesoramiento individual y grupal, ayudan en asuntos de inmigración y apoyan a las mujeres mientras navegan a través de los tribunales familiares y penales.

“Nuestro programa es muy completo”, dijo Rosita Romero, co-fundadora y presidenta de la organización. “No somos abogados, pero ayudamos a que las mujeres obtengan órdenes de protección”.

Una parte importante de su programa es la capacitación en empoderamiento y liderazgo, dijo Karina Aybar-Jacobs, directora del programa de Lucha contra la Violencia. Las mujeres que han pasado por orientación después de una relación abusiva ayudan a otras mujeres.

“Acompañan a las mujeres a los tribunales o las ayudan a obtener los servicios que de otra manera no podrían buscar porque son nuevas inmigrantes o carecen de dominio del idioma inglés”, dijo.

“Our program is very comprehensive,” said Rosita Romero, Co-Founder and President of the Dominican Women’s Development Center (DWDC), here seated in red blouse with the organization’s staff.

“Nuestro programa es muy completo”, dijo Rosita Romero, co-fundadora y presidenta del Centro de Desarrollo para las Mujeres Dominicanas (DWDC por sus siglas en inglés), aquí sentada, usando una blusa roja, con el personal de la organización.

Las mujeres pueden beneficiarse de la Ley de Violencia contra la Mujer, o VAWA por sus siglas en inglés, que proporciona asistencia legal y protección a las personas desalojadas de sus hogares debido a las circunstancias alrededor de la violencia doméstica o acoso. La ley también provee servicios a las mujeres indocumentadas.

“Alrededor del 75 al 80 por ciento de las mujeres que atendemos son indocumentadas”, dijo  Aybar-Jacobs. “Su situación legal no es una barrera para que reciban los servicios. No van a ser deportadas”.

El choque cultural que los inmigrantes enfrentan en Estados Unidos es un gran tema de discusión en sus talleres, dijo Aybar-Jacobs. Los hombres a veces sienten que sus esposas y novias actúan de manera diferente de lo que sería en el país de origen. “Se sienten castrados, su imagen masculina se ve disminuida por la manera en que las mujeres se comportan aquí”, dijo.

“La violencia doméstica es una dinámica de poder y control”, dijo Romero. “Parte de la dinámica es quién tiene el poder en la relación”.

No todas las mujeres enfrentan situaciones graves y potencialmente mortales. Algunas mujeres optan por quedarse en las relaciones, sobre todo si el agresor admite que ha sido abusivo y busca ayuda.

Algunas mujeres no se ven a sí mismas como víctimas de abuso. A veces, las mujeres incluso inician la violencia y no lo ven como abuso, piensan que sólo es una pelea.

The organization will honor Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence.

La organización reconocerá a Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, la comisionada de la Oficina del alcalde para Combatir la Violencia Doméstica.

Cuando las mujeres son las primeras en golpear, los hombres a veces toman represalias. Pero lo hacen con una fuerza mucho mayor. “Es una forma de decir: voy a ser un hombre y voy a controlarte”, dijo Romero.

“Tendemos a verlo en las parejas más jóvenes, en las que ambos se golpean y son físicamente abusivos. Entonces es más difícil de definir el abuso”, dijo Aybar-Jacobs.

Puede ser que sea algo natural de luchar en defensa propia, pero la violencia no se resuelve con más violencia, dijo.

“Lo que recomendamos es que se alejen de la situación de violencia, vayan a la comisaría más cercana o llamen al 911”, dijo. “Después, llamen a nuestra línea directa para recibir apoyo emocional”.

Gran parte de la discusión en la terapia de grupo se centra en cómo reconocer el abuso. “Por lo general, las mujeres que acuden por primera vez están un poco desorientadas”, dijo Figueroa. Las mujeres a menudo están deprimidas y no tienen una visión para su futuro.

“Es importante que las mujeres sean más estables y entiendan que hay más ayuda ahí para enfrentar los problemas de violencia doméstica y de inmigración”, agregó.

DWDC programs are held at Bethania Alvarado’s beauty salon on West 177th Street.

Los programas DWDC se llevan a cabo en el salón de belleza de Bethania Alvarado, en la calle 177 oeste.

El Centro de Desarrollo para las Mujeres Dominicanas, también conocido como “El Centro”, ayuda a las mujeres de todas las etnias y razas. Aybar-Jacobs dijo que las mujeres hispanas y blancas, afroamericanas y asiáticas, piden ayuda. De hecho, muchas mujeres asiáticas buscan sus servicios por temor a ser condenadas al ostracismo en sus propias comunidades, dijo.

El Centro también realiza talleres en salones de belleza, escuelas e iglesias en todo el norte de Manhattan y el Bronx. “La educación comunitaria es una parte muy importante del programa”, dijo Romero.

Uno de estos talleres se celebró en el salón de belleza de Bethania Alvarado, en la calle 177 oeste, al oeste de Broadway. En los días más concurridos del salón, más de 60 mujeres lo visitan para peinar su cabello, cortarlo o pintarlo, dijo la estilista Dayaira Núñez.

Honoree Adriano Espaillat, State Senator.

Adriano Espaillat, homenajeado, senador estatal.

“Estamos abiertos a permitir que nuestros clientes hablen sobre la violencia doméstica”, explicó Alvarado. “En la República Dominicana, hay un montón de mujeres que mueren a causa de esto”.

Figueroa se enteró del programa por la oficina del concejal Ydanis Rodríguez. Durante los últimos cuatro años, ella ha asistido con regularidad a sesiones de terapia individuales y en grupo.

“Ese grupo es como mi familia”, dijo. “Cambió todo”.

 

La línea directa del Centro de Desarrollo para las Mujeres Dominicanas es 212.568.6616.

El Centro de Desarrollo para las Mujeres Dominicanas está celebrando su 16° aniversario el jueves 31 de julio, de 6 p.m. a 9 p.m. en Pediatrics 2000, en el 3332 de Broadway. Entre los homenajeados están: Rosemonde Pierre-Louis, comisionada de la Oficina del Alcalde para Combatir la Violencia Doméstica (OCDV por sus siglas en inglés); Grace Pérez, ex directora ejecutiva del Programa de Intervención de la Violencia; Mildred Valdézconsejera/defensora del programa Nuevo Amanecer/New Dawn y el senador estatal Adriano Espaillat.

Los boletos pueden adquirirse en www.dwdc.org. Por favor llame o envíe un correo electrónico a Bernadette García al 212.568.6616 /bgarcia@dwdc.org para obtener mayor información.