CommunityHomelessnessHousingImmigrationNewsPolitics/GovernmentSocial Justice

“The city must have a plan”
“La ciudad debe tener un plan”

Advocates press city to improve shelter intake process
Llamado a mejorar el proceso de admisión en los refugios

“The city must have a plan”

Advocates press city to improve shelter intake process

By Gregg McQueen

Shelter demand has continued to grow.

More than just slogans.

More than 4,000 asylum seekers have arrived in New York City since May, according to city officials.

Mayor Eric Adams has previously pinned blame for the shelter crunch on the wave of these arrivals.

But advocates for the homeless are urging the administration to better address the intake process for individuals seeking shelter in order to meet its stated dual missions both as a “right-to-shelter” city and a “sanctuary city.”

“New York is both a sanctuary city and a right-to-shelter city,” said Adrienne Holder, of the Legal Aid Society.

Gathering on the steps of City Hall on Tues., Aug. 9th, advocates called on the city to take action to address the surge in application for spots in homeless shelters.

The recent wave of migrants arriving in New York, they argue, only highlights the existing gaps in the shelter application process and the lack of affordable housing options – both of which should be addressed quickly.

“New York is both a sanctuary city and a right-to-shelter city,” said Adrienne Holder, Chief Attorney of the Civil Practice at Legal Aid Society. “What that means is, everyone who comes here has a right to seek shelter and safety in this city.”

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has begun busing migrants to New York City.
Photo: Diane Bondareff | NYC Mayor’s Office

“At a time where there’s increased demand for city shelter, the city must have a plan to mitigate that increased demand,” she said.

Advocates asked the city to not let the shelter vacancy rate fall below 5 percent at any point, and move people out of the shelter system more quickly by investing in affordable housing, while ensuring staff capacity to process housing packages and fight against source of income discrimination.

“Shelter beds should only serve as a stopgap – we need the government to prioritize housing,” Holder said. “And we need to make sure that there is no bureaucratic deficiency when it comes to moving people out of the shelter system.”

Asylum seekers have been arriving via bus from Texas.
Photo: Diane Bondareff | NYC Mayor’s Office

The press conference was held immediately before an oversight hearing by the New York City Council on the city’s shelter intake process for homeless families.

Advocates and legal service providers charge the Adams administration with exaggerating the impact of migrants in the city shelter system.

“We’ve never seen any data to support the claims that the system is being overwhelmed by asylum seekers,” said Josh Goldfein, staff attorney at Legal Aid Society.

According to the Legal Aid Society, some families were left to sleep on the floor of a Bronx intake center during July instead of being placed in a shelter, in violation of city law. Families are often forced to wait in hours-long lines to begin the intake process.

Taysha Milagros Clark, policy and data analyst for Coalition for the Homeless, implored the city to provide specifics on its plan to assist asylum seekers. However, she said the arrival of new migrants is not an excuse for failing to provide proper accommodations to homeless families.

“No amount of scapegoating can take away from the fact that New York City was already experiencing a homelessness and shelter capacity crisis, because of the city’s own failures and lack of planning,” she said.

“New York remains in a dire housing and affordability crisis,” said Taysha Milagros Clark, of the Coalition for the Homeless.

Goldfein said the city should have been better prepared for increased shelter demand, as it encounters a spike in shelter applications every summer.

He also faulted the city for not funding more tenant lawyers in housing court to slow evictions, or fully staffing the NYC Commission on Human Rights, which is responsible for researching violations and providing legal help to renters.

“Evictions were increasing month over month, rents were increasing,” Goldfein said. “It was no mystery to anyone that people were going to be losing their homes and becoming homeless this summer.”

Recently, Texas Governor Greg Abbott began busing migrants to New York City, after they were detained crossing over the U.S. border from Mexico. The effort is considered a backlash to President Joe Biden’s open border policies.

“Governor Abbott is shamelessly exploiting refugees for cheap political points,” said City Councilmember Shahana Hanif. “FEMA should be at the border offering support and shelter to all who need it.”
While bashing Abbott, Hanif stressed that it was New York City’s duty to welcome the asylum seekers and provide them with services.

“Shelter beds should only serve as a stopgap,” said Holder.

“We are a right-to-shelter city, and this needs to be more than just a slogan,” she said.

At the Council hearing, Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Manuel Castro said the city is preparing to open a specialized help center for migrants within the next two weeks, in addition to more emergency housing units.

However, Castro blamed the state of Texas for failing to coordinate with New York City when busing asylum seekers to the Big Apple.

The City Council held an oversight hearing on concerns regarding the shelter intake process.

“They’ve essentially weaponized this situation,” remarked Castro. “We’ve learned that the bus company that they’ve been working with has a non-disclosure agreement that does not allow them to communicate with the city of New York.”

At the Council hearing, City Council Speaker Adrienne Adams called for more transparency from Mayor Adams regarding the shelter intake process.

Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Manuel Castro testified at the Council hearing.
Photo: Emil Cohen | NYC Council

“Over the past few weeks, we have heard heartbreaking stories of vulnerable people seeking asylum arriving at the City’s shelter intake offices, only to be delayed in receiving support,” said Adams. “The Administration has admitted that there were at least four families with children, who were forced to sleep on the floor of the intake office before they were provided with shelter placement. This not only violates the city’s right to shelter laws, but does immeasurable harm to these families. It is degrading and inhumane and not what this city stands for.”

Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Manuel Castro testified at the Council hearing.
Photo: Emil Cohen | NYC Council

Speaker Adams acknowledged that a variety of factors have placed stress on the city’s shelter system, including the economic impact of the pandemic, end of the eviction moratorium, and staffing levels at the Department of Homeless Services and Human Rights Administration.

“There is a lack of clarity on how this Administration is quantifying how many people seeking asylum are arriving in New York City,” she said.

Advocates are calling on the city to create at least 6,000 new apartments per year for homeless households and an additional 6,000 new apartments per year for households with extremely low incomes.

“We’ve never seen any data,” said Legal Aid’s Josh Goldfein, of the claims regarding migrants.

They also requested that the Adams administration streamline the review process and expand access to CityFHEPS vouchers, reevaluate the three-month shelter requirement, and waive the work requirements for people who receive public assistance.

“New York remains in a dire housing and affordability crisis. Until the city gets real about addressing it, people continue to languish in shelters and on the streets,” said Clark, who exhorted state lawmakers to pass “good cause” eviction legislation to help keep New Yorkers in their homes.

“If we’re not preventing homelessness in the first place, mass homelessness will continue to exist,” Clark said, “and new arrivals will continue to suffer.”

“La ciudad debe tener un plan

Llamado a mejorar el proceso de admisión en los refugios 

Por Gregg McQueen

La demanda de refugios ha seguido creciendo.

Mucho más que eslóganes.

Más de 4,000 solicitantes de asilo han llegado a la ciudad de Nueva York desde mayo, según las autoridades municipales.

El alcalde Eric Adams ha culpado de la escasez de refugios a la oleada de estas llegadas.

Sin embargo, los defensores de las personas sin hogar instan a la administración a mejorar el proceso de admisión de personas que buscan refugio para cumplir su doble misión declarada como ciudad con “derecho a refugio” y como “ciudad santuario”.

“Nueva York es tanto una ciudad santuario como una ciudad con derecho a refugio”, dijo Adrienne Holder, de la Sociedad de Ayuda Legal.

Reunidos en las escalinatas del Ayuntamiento el martes 9 de agosto, los defensores pidieron a la ciudad tomar medidas para hacer frente al aumento de solicitudes de alojamiento en los albergues para personas sin hogar.

La reciente oleada de inmigrantes que llegan a Nueva York, los defensores argumentan, no hace sino resaltar las lagunas existentes en el proceso de solicitud de refugios y la falta de opciones de vivienda asequible, cuestiones ambas que deben ser abordadas cuanto antes.

El gobernador de Texas, Greg Abbott, ha comenzado a enviar a los inmigrantes en autobús a la ciudad de Nueva York.

“Nueva York es a la vez una ciudad santuario y una ciudad con derecho a refugio”, dijo Adrienne Holder, abogada principal de la Práctica Civil de la Sociedad de Ayuda Legal. “Lo que eso significa es que todos los que vienen aquí tienen derecho a buscar refugio y seguridad en esta ciudad”.

“En un momento en que hay una mayor demanda de refugio, la ciudad debe tener un plan para mitigar esa creciente demanda”, dijo.

Los defensores pidieron a la ciudad no permitir que el índice de vacantes de los refugios caiga por debajo del 5% en ningún momento, y sacar a la gente del sistema de refugios más rápidamente invirtiendo en viviendas asequibles, al tiempo que se garantiza la capacidad del personal para procesar los paquetes de vivienda y luchar contra la discriminación por la fuente de ingresos.

Los solicitantes de asilo han llegado en autobús desde Texas.
Foto: Diane Bondareff | Oficina del alcalde de NYC

“Necesitamos que el gobierno dé prioridad a la vivienda”, dijo Holder. “Y tenemos que asegurarnos de que no haya deficiencias burocráticas a la hora de sacar a la gente del sistema de refugios”.

La conferencia de prensa se celebró inmediatamente antes de una audiencia de supervisión del Concejo de la Ciudad de Nueva York sobre el proceso de admisión en los refugios de la ciudad para las familias sin hogar.

Defensores y proveedores de servicios legales acusan al gobierno de Adams de exagerar el impacto de los inmigrantes en el sistema de refugios de la ciudad.

“Nueva York sigue inmersa en una grave crisis de vivienda y asequibilidad”, dijo Taysha Milagros Clark, de la Coalición para las Personas sin Hogar.

“Nunca hemos visto ningún dato que respalde las afirmaciones de que el sistema está desbordado por los solicitantes de asilo”, dijo Josh Goldfein, abogado de la Sociedad de Ayuda Legal.

Según la Sociedad de Ayuda Legal, durante el mes de julio se dejó a algunas familias durmiendo en el suelo de un centro de acogida del Bronx en lugar de colocarlas en un refugio, lo que viola la ley de la ciudad. Las familias a menudo se ven obligadas a esperar en filas de varias horas para comenzar el proceso de admisión.

“Las camas de los refugios sólo deben servir como un recurso temporal”, dijo Holder.

Taysha Milagros Clark, analista de políticas y datos de la Coalición para las Personas sin Hogar, imploró a la ciudad que proporcione detalles sobre su plan para ayudar a los solicitantes de asilo. Sin embargo, dijo que la llegada de nuevos inmigrantes no es una excusa para no brindar un alojamiento adecuado a las familias sin hogar.

“Ningún chivo expiatorio puede ocultar el hecho de que la ciudad de Nueva York ya experimentaba una crisis de falta de vivienda y de capacidad de alojamiento, debido a los propios fallos de la ciudad y a la falta de planificación”, dijo.

El Ayuntamiento celebró una audiencia de supervisión sobre las preocupaciones relacionadas con el proceso de admisión en los albergues.

Goldfein señaló que la ciudad debería haber estado mejor preparada para el aumento de la demanda de refugios, ya que todos los veranos se produce un pico de solicitudes de refugio.

También culpó a la ciudad por no financiar más abogados de inquilinos en los tribunales de vivienda para frenar los desalojos, o por no haber provisto de personal suficiente a la Comisión de Derechos Humanos de NYC, que es responsable de investigar las violaciones y proporcionar ayuda legal a los inquilinos.

“Los desalojos aumentaban mes a mes, los alquileres aumentaban”, dijo Goldfein. “Para nadie era un misterio que la gente iba a perder sus viviendas y a quedarse sin hogar este verano”.

El comisionado de Asuntos de Inmigración, Manuel Castro, testificó en la audiencia del Concejo.
Foto: Emil Cohen | Concejo de NYC

Recientemente, el gobernador de Texas, Greg Abbott, comenzó a trasladar en autobús a los inmigrantes a la ciudad de Nueva York, después de que fueran detenidos al cruzar la frontera de Estados Unidos desde México. Este esfuerzo se considera una reacción a las políticas de fronteras abiertas del presidente Joe Biden.

“El gobernador Abbott está explotando sin pudor a los refugiados para obtener puntos políticos baratos”, dijo la concejala Shahana Hanif. “FEMA debería estar en la frontera ofreciendo apoyo y refugio a todos los que lo necesitan.

“
Al tiempo que arremetía contra Abbott, Hanif subrayó que la ciudad de Nueva York tiene el deber de acoger a los solicitantes de asilo y ofrecerles servicios.

“Somos una ciudad con derecho a refugio, y esto tiene que ser algo más que un eslogan”, dijo.

En la audiencia del Concejo, el comisionado de la Oficina de Asuntos de Inmigración de la Alcaldía, Manuel Castro, dijo que la ciudad se está preparando para abrir un centro de ayuda especializado para migrantes en las próximas dos semanas, así como más unidades de alojamiento de emergencia.

Sin embargo, Castro culpó al estado de Texas de no coordinarse con la ciudad de Nueva York a la hora de trasladar en autobús a los solicitantes de asilo a la Gran Manzana.

“Han convertido esta situación en un arma”, señaló Castro. “Hemos sabido que la compañía de autobuses con la que han estado trabajando tiene un acuerdo de confidencialidad que no les permite comunicarse con la ciudad de Nueva York”.

Los oficiales, incluido el alcalde Adams, visitaron recientemente la terminal de autobuses de la Autoridad Portuaria para saludar a los solicitantes de asilo.

En la audiencia del Concejo, la presidenta del Concejo Municipal, Adrienne Adams, pidió más transparencia al alcalde con respecto al proceso de admisión de los albergues.

“En las últimas semanas, hemos escuchado historias desgarradoras de personas vulnerables que buscan asilo y que llegan a las oficinas de admisión de refugios de la ciudad, sólo para recibir la ayuda con retraso”, dijo Adams. “La administración ha admitido que había al menos cuatro familias con niños, la cuales fueron obligadas a dormir en el suelo de la oficina de admisión antes de que se les proporcionara un alojamiento. Esto no sólo viola las leyes de derecho a la acogida de la ciudad, sino que causa un daño inconmensurable a estas familias. Es degradante e inhumano y no representa a esta ciudad”.

La presidenta Adams reconoció que una serie de factores han puesto en tensión el sistema de refugios de la ciudad, como el impacto económico de la pandemia, el fin de la moratoria de desalojos y los niveles de personal del Departamento de Servicios para las Personas sin Hogar y la Administración de Derechos Humanos.

“No está claro cómo esta administración está cuantificando cuántas personas en busca de asilo están llegando a la ciudad de Nueva York”, dijo.

“Nunca hemos visto ningún dato”, dijo Josh Goldfein, de Ayuda Legal, sobre las afirmaciones relacionadas con los inmigrantes.

Los defensores piden a la ciudad que cree al menos 6,000 nuevos apartamentos al año para las familias sin hogar y otros 6,000 nuevos apartamentos al año para las familias con ingresos extremadamente bajos.
También solicitan que el gobierno de Adams agilice el proceso de revisión y amplíe el acceso a los vales CityFHEPS, que reevalúe el requisito de tres meses de alojamiento y que renuncie a los requisitos de trabajo para las personas que reciben asistencia pública.

“Nueva York sigue inmersa en una grave crisis de vivienda y asequibilidad. Hasta que la ciudad actúe de forma realista para resolver la crisis, la gente seguirá padeciendo en los albergues y en las calles”, dijo Clark, exhortando a los legisladores estatales a aprobar una ley de desalojo con “buena causa” para ayudar a mantener a los neoyorquinos en sus hogares.

“Si no prevenimos el problema de las personas sin hogar en primer lugar, seguirá existiendo este fenómeno en masa”, señaló Clark, “y los recién llegados seguirán sufriendo”.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker