A crown jewel for the Creek

Una joya de la corona para el arroyo

  • English
  • Español

A crown jewel for the Creek

Story by Gregg McQueen

A flood-resistant outdoor recreation and learning center will soon be coming to Sherman Creek.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

A flood-resistant outdoor recreation and learning center will soon be coming to Sherman Creek.
Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Already a stunning oasis on the Harlem River’s shoreline in Inwood and Washington Heights, Sherman Creek Park is about to become even more impressive.

New York Restoration Project (NYRP), the non-profit organization that maintains the park, which includes Swindler Cove, recently selected Brooklyn-based architecture firm Bade Stageberg Cox to design a flood-resistant outdoor recreation and learning center on the riverbank.

Two structures will be created ―a boathouse to allow for recreational rowing, and an open classroom where children can learn ecology while interacting with the natural environment.

By placing the buildings on twin peninsulas at the water’s edge, the architects hope to create a direct connection between park visitors and the river.

Bade Stageberg Cox architects hope to create a direct connection between park visitors and the river. Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Bade Stageberg Cox architects hope to create a direct connection between park visitors and the river.
Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

“We chose to site the buildings on the peninsulas where the land interlocks with the river,” said Tim Bade, principal at Bade Stageberg Cox, whose design was chosen through a competition. “Together, the classroom and boathouse form a threshold between land and water.”

In July, NYRP launched the EDGE/ucation Pavilion Design Competition in response to Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s call to increase resilience of infrastructure citywide.

Eight local architecture firms were invited to submit designs for a state-of-the-art, storm-resilient pavilion to be built in the park.

In September, NYRP shortlisted Bade Stageberg Cox together with three other finalists.

Submissions were reviewed by a panel that included NYRP founder Bette Midler, along with architects and sustainability experts.

The metal skin used is made of expanded weathered steel panels, with slotted openings that allow water to flow in and out freely.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

The metal skin used is made of expanded weathered steel panels, with slotted openings that allow water to flow in and out freely.
Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Bade Stageberg Cox was named the winner in December.

“All of the submissions were very strong,” Deborah Marton, Senior Vice President of Programs for NYRP, told The Manhattan Times.

“The winning design split the pavilion into two different structures for the boathouse and classroom, and they did a wonderful job of integrating educational components with the landscape,” she added.

Learning stations will be dotted throughout the site, where visitors can observe wildlife, collect oysters and examine microbial samples in microscopes.

Unique features of the design include benches that also function as 100-year flood markers, “tidal mirrors” that will capture water and mark high and low tides, and a solar garden with photovoltaic panels to run path and building lighting.

A skylight in the classroom roof will hold rain water as a gauge of recent rainfalls, and cast rippling reflections of sunlight onto the classroom’s interior.

A skylight in the classroom roof will cast rippling reflections of sunlight into the room.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

A skylight in the classroom roof will cast rippling reflections of sunlight into the room.
Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Sherman Creek Park, a five-acre stretch of green space along the Harlem River Drive near the intersections of Dyckman Street and 10th Avenue, languished for years as an illegal trash dumping ground until NYRP launched a extensive effort to clean up the area in 1996.

After removing tons of garbage, construction debris and abandoned cars, and replanting the shoreline with native plant species, NYRP constructed Swindler Cove and the Peter Jay Sharp Boathouse, as well as a scenic bike path, freshwater pond and children’s garden on the site.

According to Marton, NYRP has invested close to $18 million into the Sherman Creek Park area since it was cleaned up. The addition of the classroom and boathouse caps off NYRP’s vision for that section of the waterfront.

“The intention was always to complete that entire stretch of land, and this is the final piece,” stated Marton.

While there is no official timetable, Marton said that the goal is to finish the project within the next three years.

"They did a wonderful job of integrating educational components with the landscape," said Deborah Marton, Senior Vice President of Programs for NYRP.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

“They did a wonderful job of integrating educational components with the landscape,” said Deborah Marton, Senior Vice President of Programs for NYRP.
Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Creating structures that can withstand harsh storms and flooding was of utmost importance, especially after the harsh realities of Hurricane Sandy.

“During the hurricane, the water flooded up to street level and we lost many trees,” said Marton.

To address flooding concerns, Bade Stageberg Cox designed the classroom and boat storage buildings with a metal skin made of expanded weathered steel panels, with slotted openings that allow water to flow in and out freely.

A cistern will store and reuse rainwater for garden irrigation, and a rock garden at the site’s lowest elevation will collect storm water and run-off.

In addition to enhancing public access to the waterfront, an essential part of NYRP’s mission has been teaching youngsters about the environment.

Students from PS 5, situated next to the park, and youth groups from nearby Dyckman Houses routinely attend ecology lessons at Swindler Cove ―the new weather-resistant classroom structure will provide an improved base for educational sessions.

“Kids need to understand what ecology is and what role they play in keeping our ecosystems healthy,” remarked Marton.

“The park has elements of ecosystems before New York City was even developed, so it’s really a great teaching tool.”

To learn more about Sherman Creek Park, visit http://bit.ly/K0hk4B.

More details about Bade Stageberg Cox’s winning design, including renderings of the proposed site, can be viewed at: http://bscarchitecture.com/.

Una joya de la corona para el arroyo

Historia por Gregg McQueen

Aunque ya es un oasis impresionante en la costa del río Harlem en Inwood y Washington Heights, el Parque Sherman Creek está a punto de ser aún más impresionante.

A flood-resistant outdoor recreation and learning center will soon be coming to Sherman Creek.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Un centro de aprendizaje y de recreación al aire libre resistente a las inundaciones pronto vendrá al Parque Sherman Creek.
Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

El Proyecto de Restauración de Nueva York (NYRP por sus siglas en inglés), la organización sin fines de lucro que mantiene el parque, que incluye Swindler Cove, seleccionó recientemente a la firma de arquitectura con sede en Brooklyn Bade Stageberg Cox para diseñar un centro de aprendizaje y de recreación al aire libre resistente a las inundaciones, en la orilla del río.

Los arquitectos de Bade Stageberg Cox esperan crear una conexión directa entre los visitantes del parque y el río. Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

Los arquitectos de Bade Stageberg Cox esperan crear una conexión directa entre los visitantes del parque y el río.
Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

Dos estructuras serán creadas: un embarcadero para permitir el remo de recreo y un aula abierta donde los niños puedan aprender ecología mientras interactúan con el entorno natural.

Al colocar los edificios en penínsulas gemelas en la orilla del agua, los arquitectos esperan crear una conexión directa entre los visitantes del parque y el río.

“Elegimos situar los edificios en las penínsulas donde la tierra conecta con el río”, dijo Tim Bade, director de Bade Stageberg Cox, cuyo diseño fue elegido a través de un concurso. “Juntos, el aula y el embarcadero forman un umbral entre la tierra y el agua”.

En julio, NYRP lanzó el Concurso de Diseño EDGE/ucation Pavilion en respuesta al llamado del alcalde Michael Bloomberg para aumentar la capacidad de recuperación de infraestructura de toda la ciudad.

Fueron invitadas ocho firmas de arquitectura locales a presentar sus diseños para un pabellón resiliente de vanguardia para ser construido en el parque. En septiembre, NYRP seleccionó a Bade Stageberg Cox junto con otros tres finalistas.

Los diseños fueron revisados por un panel que incluyó a la fundadora de NYRP Bette Midler, junto con arquitectos y expertos en sustentabilidad.

The metal skin used is made of expanded weathered steel panels, with slotted openings that allow water to flow in and out freely.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Launa piel metálica es hecha de paneles de acero expandidos degradados, con aberturas ranuradas que permiten que el agua entre y salga libremente.
Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

Bade Stageberg Cox fue la firma nombrada ganadora en diciembre.

“Todas las presentaciones fueron muy fuertes”, Deborah Marton, vicepresidente de programas de NYRP, dijo a The Manhattan Times.

“El diseño ganador dividió el pabellón en dos estructuras diferentes para el embarcadero y el aula, e hicieron un trabajo maravilloso de integrar componentes educativos con el paisaje”, agregó.

Las estaciones de aprendizaje estarán repartidas por todo el sitio, donde los visitantes puedan observar la vida silvestre, recoger ostras y examinar muestras de microorganismos en microscopios.

Las características únicas del diseño incluyen bancas que también funcionan como marcadores de inundación de 100 años, “espejos de marea” que captarán el agua y marcarán las mareas altas y bajas, y una huerta solar con paneles fotovoltaicos para gestionar la iluminación del sendero y el edificio.

Un tragaluz en el techo del aula mantendrá el agua de lluvia como un indicador de las lluvias recientes, y producirá reflejos de ondulación de luz solar en el interior del salón de clases.

El parque Sherman Creek, un tramo de cinco acres de espacios verdes a lo largo del Harlem River Drive, cerca de la intersección de la calle Dyckman y la avenida 10, languideció durante años como un vertedero de basura ilegal hasta que NYRP puso en marcha un amplio esfuerzo para limpiar el área en 1996.

Después de retirar toneladas de basura, escombros de construcción, coches abandonados, y replantar la costa con especies de plantas nativas, NYRP construyó Swindler Cove y el embarcadero Peter Jay Sharp, así como un sendero panorámico para bicicletas, un estanque de agua dulce y un jardín infantil en el sitio.

Según Marton, NYRP ha invertido cerca de 18 millones de dólares en el área del parque Sherman Creek Park desde que fue limpiado. La incorporación del aula y el embarcadero remataron la visión de NYRP para esa sección de la línea de costa.

A skylight in the classroom roof will cast rippling reflections of sunlight into the room.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

Un tragaluz en el techo del aula producirá reflejos de ondulación de luz solar en el interior del salón de clases.
Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

“La intención fue siempre completar todo ese tramo de tierra y esta es la última pieza,” afirmó Marton.

Si bien no hay una fecha oficial, Marton dijo que el objetivo es terminar el proyecto dentro de los próximos tres años.

Crear estructuras que puedan resistir las tormentas severas e inundaciones era de suma importancia, sobre todo después de las duras realidades del Huracán Sandy.

"They did a wonderful job of integrating educational components with the landscape," said Deborah Marton, Senior Vice President of Programs for NYRP.  Photo: Bade Stageberg Cox

“Hicieron un trabajo maravilloso de integrar componentes educativos con el paisaje”, dijo Deborah Marton, vicepresidente de programas de NYRP.
Foto: Bade Stageberg Cox

“Durante el huracán, el agua subió hasta el nivel de la calle y perdimos muchos árboles”, dijo Marton.

Para abordar las preocupaciones de las inundaciones, Bade Stageberg Cox diseñó los edificios de almacenamiento -aula y embarcadero- con una piel metálica hecha de paneles de acero expandidos degradados, con aberturas ranuradas que permiten que el agua entre y salga libremente.

Una cisterna almacenará y reutilizará el agua de lluvia para el riego del jardín, y un jardín de rocas en la cota más baja del sitio recogerá las aguas pluviales y de escorrentía.

Además de mejorar el acceso público a la orilla del mar, una parte esencial de la misión de NYRP ha sido enseñar a los jóvenes sobre el medio ambiente.

Estudiantes de la escuela pública 5, situada al lado del parque, y grupos de jóvenes de las cercanas Casas Dyckman, asisten habitualmente a lecciones de ecología en Swindler Cove, la nueva estructura del salón de clases resistente a la intemperie proporcionará una base mejorada para las sesiones educativas.

“Los niños necesitan entender lo que es la ecología y el papel que desempeñan en mantener nuestros ecosistemas saludables”, comentó Marton.

“El parque cuenta con elementos de los ecosistemas antes de que la ciudad de Nueva York fuera incluso desarrollada, por lo que es realmente una gran herramienta de enseñanza.”

Para aprender más sobre el parque Sherman Creek Park, visite http://bit.ly/K0hk4B.

Más detalles sobre el diseño ganador de Bade Stageberg Cox, incluyendo versiones del sitio propuesto, se pueden ver en: http://bscarchitecture.com/.