What would Martha say?
¿Qué diría Martha?

  • English
  • Español

What would Martha say?

Nude goddesses andtrenzas’ for George in two new exhibits at Morris Jumel

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

Video by Sherry Mazzocchi

George Washington returns to the Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum this fall.

And he’s accompanied by dancing nude goddesses drenched in vivid hues.

Both are part of two exhibits opening Sept. 15th at Manhattan’s oldest house.

The two shows are by local artists Andrea Arroyo and Felipe Galindo.

Andrea Arroyo and Felipe Galindo are together bringing two new exhibits to the Morris Jumel Mansion.

Andrea Arroyo and Felipe Galindo are together bringing two new exhibits to the Morris Jumel Mansion.

They are vastly different, yet work together brilliantly at reframing the museum in the context of the contemporary neighborhood.

Married for more than 25 five years, the couple works in separate studios in their Washington Heights apartment, not far from the mansion.

Both are accomplished, award-winning artists.

In his exhibit, Galindo conjures Washington, transporting the famed general and president back to El Alto.

At the same time, Arroyo evokes a pantheon of Mexican and classical goddesses, whisking their ethereal energy into the museum.

In George Washington Revisits Washington Heights, Galindo employs his witty New Yorker cartoon humor to capture the First Father’s return.

The show features a series of comic drawings and prints of Washington, in full 18th century regalia, wandering around the Heights. He even contemplates trading his white powdered locks for braids, or trenzas, at the barbershop.

Even though Galindo is familiar with the neighborhood, the dominant Dominican culture is different from his own native Mexican heritage.

“Color is a living thing that tells me what to do,” explained Arroyo of her work, which often depicts lyrical images of women as part warrior, part goddess.

“Color is a living thing that tells me what to do,” explained Arroyo of her work, which often depicts lyrical images of women as part warrior, part goddess.

“It’s very unusual for me,” he said. He often walks around as an observer, so it was easy to see the area through Washington’s eyes.

Washington rarely went anywhere without his horse.

Just like New Yorkers who schlep strollers, bikes and pets on public transit, Washington waits for the bus with his ride at his side.

In another print, he and the horse stand on the A train.

Most people know George Washington from paintings, in which he always appears as formal. “I think he would be around in the same manner,” Galindo said.

“And that also creates a contrast to see somebody very proper in a neighborhood that is very relaxed.”

Carol Ward, director of education at the Morris Jumel Mansion, said these exhibits inspire visitors to think about history in an entirely new way.

“Our mission is to educate people about the history of the museum,” said Ward, “and also the history of the neighborhood.”

In his revisioning of George Washington, Galindo places the nation’s first president in contemporary northern Manhattan. “[It] creates a contrast to see somebody very proper in a neighborhood that is very relaxed.”

In his revisioning of George
Washington, Galindo places the
nation’s first president in
contemporary northern Manhattan.
“[It] creates a contrast to see
somebody very proper in a
neighborhood that is very relaxed.”

Arroyo takes the idea of traditional 18th and 19th century women and inverts it. Her exhibit, Women Unbound, is full of lush female figures representing freedom.

Arroyo loves the mansion, especially for the strong women, Mary Philipse Morris and Eliza Jumel, who lived there. She wants to link these historical women to women living in the neighborhood today.

She sees her lyrical images of women as part warrior, part goddess.

They revel in their freedom and ability to soar over struggles.

A dancer before she picked up paints and palettes, Arroyo’s women glide across the canvas. She makes ample use of blues, greens, orange and pink.

Arroyo is a self-taught artist. She applies layer upon layer of color, achieving a super-saturated look.

“I just trust myself,” she said. “Color is a living thing that tells me what to do.”

She also pays attention to what women wore then.

The voluminous dresses were restrictive, with tiny waists made even smaller by corsets and unnaturally small shoes.

“My work is mostly nude women,” she said.

“It celebrates women’s forms, women’s curves. It’s about freedom.” She called the contrast of a restrictive society and her work a celebration.

Arroyo’s paintings are placed in, around and on top of museum objects, having the effect of goddesses inhabiting boxes, tea caddies and lounging on furniture.

A painting of the mythic Daphne, who dodged Zeus’ advances by turning into a tree, gracefully folds around a clock base. The clock was a gift from Napoleon to Eliza Jumel.

Arroyo said she thought of the mansion as an amazing cultural resource, and an American icon rooted in the deep past.

“Then again, it’s in Washington Heights, New York—which is also 100 percent American,” she said.

Museums aren’t required to be an intimidating and static experience for visitors, Ward said. It’s useful to take traditional spaces and mix them up with thought-provoking exhibits. “Washington’s bedroom is always going to look the same,” she said. “He doesn’t come back and move things around.”

To hear from artist Andrea Arroyo, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_068.

To hear from artist Felipe Galindo, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_067.

The opening reception for “Women Unbound” and “George Washington Revisits Washington Heights” is Sat., Sept. 15, 2012 from 4 to 6 pm at The Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum, 65 Jumel Terrace (between 160 – 162 Streets.) The exhibits run through January 7, 2013.

For more information, please visit www.morrisjumel.org or call 212.923.8008.

 

¿Qué diría Martha?

Diosas desnudas y trenzas para George en dos próximas exhibiciones de Morris Jumel

Historia y fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

Video por Sherry Mazzocchi

In his revisioning of George Washington, Galindo places the nation’s first president in contemporary northern Manhattan. “[It] creates a contrast to see somebody very proper in a neighborhood that is very relaxed.”

En su revisión de George Washington,
Galindo coloca al primer presidente de
la nación en el contemporáneo Norte
de Manhattan. “Crea un contraste en
ver a alguien tan directo en un
vecindario que es bien relajante.”

George Washington regresa al Museo de la Mansión Morris-Jumel este otoño.

Y está acompañado de diosas desnudas bailando bañadas en vivos matices.

Ambas son parte de las dos exhibiciones abriendo el 15 de septiembre en la casa más vieja de Manhattan.

Los dos espectáculos son por los artistas locales Andrea Arroyo y Felipe Galindo.

Son ampliamente diferentes, aunque trabajaron juntos brillantemente en la realineación del museo en el contexto del contemporáneo vecindario.

Casados por más de 25 años, la pareja trabaja es estudios separados en su apartamento en Washington Heights, no lejos de la mansión.

Ambos artistas consumados, ganadores de premios.

Galindo evoca a Washington, transportando al famoso general y presidente de vuelta a El Alto.

Al mismo tiempo, Arroyo evoca un panteón de diosas mexicanas y clásicas, batiendo su energía etérea en el museo.

En ‘George Washington Revisits Washington Heights’, Galindo emplea su ingenioso humor neoyorquino de dibujo animado para capturar el regreso del Primer Padre.

El espectáculo presenta una serie de dibujos cómicos y fotos de Washington, en pleno siglo 18, vagando por los Heights. Hasta está contemplando cambiar sus blancos rizos por trenzas en la barbería.

Aunque Galindo está familiarizado con el vecindario, la dominante cultura dominicana es diferente de su propia herencia mexicana.

“Para mi es bien raro”, dijo el. A menudo camina por los alrededores como observador, así es que fue fácil mirar el área a través de los ojos de Washington.

Washington raramente iba a algún lugar sin su caballo.

Al igual que los neoyorquinos que arrastran coches, bicicletas y mascotas en el transporte público, Washington espera por el autobús con su transporte al lado.

“Color is a living thing that tells me what to do,” explained Arroyo of her work, which often depicts lyrical images of women as part warrior, part goddess.

“El color es algo viviente que me dice que hacer”, explicó Arroyo de su trabajo, el cual ha menudo representa imágenes líricas de mujeres parte guerreras y parte diosas.’’

En otra foto, el y su caballo están de pie en el tren A.

La mayoría de las personas conocen a George Washington por fotos, en las cuales siempre aparece formal. “Pienso que debería estar por ahí de la misma manera”, dijo Galindo. “Y eso también crea un contraste de ver a alguien bien propio en un vecindario que es bien relajante”.

Carol Ward, directora de educación de la Mansión Morris Jumel, dijo que estas exhibiciones inspiran a los visitantes a pensar acerca de la historia de una manera completamente diferente.

“Nuestra misión es educar a las personas acerca de la historia del museo”, dijo Ward, “y también la historia del vecindario”.

Arroyo toma la idea de la mujer tradicional del siglo 18 y 19 y la invierte. Su exhibición, ‘Women Unbound’, está llena de exuberante figuras femeninas representando libertad.

Arroyo ama la mansión, especialmente por la mujer fuerte, Mary Philipse Morris y Eliza Jumel, quienes vivieron ahí. Ella desea enlazar estas históricas mujeres a las mujeres que viven hoy en el vecindario.

Ella ve sus imágenes líricas de mujer como parte guerrera, parte diosa.

Se deleitan en su libertad y habilidad de volar sobre las luchas.

Bailarina antes de tomar la pintura y la paleta, las mujeres de Arroyo se deslizan sobre el lienzo. Hace amplio uso de los azules, verdes, naranjas y rosados.

Arroyo es una artista autodidacta. Aplica capa sobre capa de color, logrando una visión supersaturada.

Andrea Arroyo and Felipe Galindo are together bringing two new exhibits to the Morris Jumel Mansion.

Andrea Arroyo y Felipe Galindo están juntos llevando dos nuevas exhibiciones a la Mansión Morris Jumel.

“Solo confío en mi”, dijo ella. “El color es algo viviente que me dice que tengo que hacer”.

También presta atención a lo que las mujeres llevan. Los voluminosos trajes eran restrictivos, con pequeñas cinturas aun más pequeñas por los corsés y zapatos demasiados pequeños.

“Mi trabajo mayormente son mujeres desnudas”, dijo ella. “Celebra la forma de las mujeres, las curvas.

Es acerca de libertad”. Llamó el contraste de una sociedad restrictiva y su trabajo, una celebración.

Las pinturas de Arroyo son colocadas en, alrededor y encima de objetos del museo, teniendo el efecto de diosas que habitan en cajas, estuches para te y descansan en los muebles.

Una pintura de la mítica Daphne, quien esquivó los avances de Zeus convirtiéndose en árbol, se encuentra elegantemente doblado alrededor de la base de un reloj.

El reloj fue un regalo de Napoleón para Eliza Jumel.

Arroyo ve la mansión como un increíble recurso cultural y un ícono americano con raíces profundas en el pasado.

“Entonces de nuevo, es Washington Heights, Nueva York – donde solo es un 100 por ciento americano”, dijo ella.

Los museos no tienen que ser experiencias intimidantes y estáticas para los visitantes, dijo Ward. Es bueno tomar espacios tradicionales y mezclarlos con exhibiciones.

“El cuarto dormitorio de Washington siempre se va a ver igual”, dijo ella. “El no viene y mueve las cosas”.

La recepción de apertura para ‘Women Unbound’ y ‘George Washington Revisits Washington Heights’ es el sábado, 15 de septiembre de 2012 de 4 a 6 en el Museo de la Mansión Morris-Jumel, 65 Jumel Terrace (entre las Calles 160 y 162). La exhibición se extiende hasta el 7 de enero de 2013.

Para más información sobre la exhibición de Andrea Arroyo y Felipe Galindo favor de visitar www.morrisjumel.org o llamar al 212.923.8008.