Vying for Viable
Competir por lo posible

  • English
  • Español

Vying for Viable

Story and photos by Mónica Barnkow

“It is very hard," said potential restaurant owner Miriam Marmolejos.

“It is very hard,” said potential restaurant owner Miriam Marmolejos.

East Harlem resident Miriam Marmolejos thought she had succeeded in landing a sweet rental deal for a commercial space.

But now, she is being told to move on.

“The landlord is giving me a hard time,” said Marmolejos, an immigrant from Dominican Republic. The 10-year rental agreement for a space in Long Island City, Queens, was where she had been planning to open her first restaurant and hire about 15 employees.

Instead, she is currently battling in court with her landlord, who, she said, intends to vacate the property and charge twice as much to a new renter.

Moreover, Marmolejos, who is also an accountant, claimed that the property was undergoing renovations worth about $250,000 that she was paying for on her own. The landlord would not provide financial help, or a rent reduction, for the costs of the repairs.

Her concerns were shared with fellow small business owners at a forum held this past Tues., May 19th. “Doing Business in NYC” was hosted by the Harlem Community Development Corporation (HCDC) in collaboration with Acción, a nationwide non-profit organization whose mission is to help entrepreneurs use micro-loans to build their businesses.

Founded in 1995, HCDC plans and facilitates a wide range of community revitalization initiatives throughout Northern Manhattan.

A recent forum focused on challenges and opportunities for small businesses.

A recent forum focused on challenges and opportunities for small businesses.

On Tuesday, panel of financing experts from leading nonprofit lending organizations responded to concerns raised by local business owners and entrepreneurs.

Quenia Abreu, President of The New York Women’s Chamber of Commerce (NYWCC), an organization focused on assisting women and minorities achieve economic independence through small business development, micro-enterprise ownership and self-employment, officiated as moderator.

“Small businesses are the New York City’s true economic engine,” she argued. “Combined, they are the largest employer providing most of the jobs in the city.”

Still, lamented Abreu, in spite of their positive economic impact, small businesses continue to face daunting obstacles, including excessively high rents; stringent regulations and fines; and difficulty in accessing the necessary capital to grow and expand.

“Look into the finances,” counseled HCDC President Curtis Archer.

“Look into the finances,” counseled HCDC President Curtis Archer.

“That is why these type of forums are so important,” she added. “We have many resources but our business owners have to know about them to be able to take advantage.”

Atop the list of challenges was acquiring and sustaining reasonable rents for commercial space.

A recent report from Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, titled “Expanding Opportunity for Manhattan’s Storefronts,” also made note how rising rents are endangering the sustainability of small enterprise.

“[Recently], New Yorkers have seen something different happening: the closing of businesses that have stood the test of time and enjoy healthy patronage from the neighborhood and surrounding city. The reason: large-scale increases in commercial rents,” stated the report.

HCDC President Curtis Archer agreed that high rents made for a prohibitive environment for entrepreneurs and business owners, and he urged those present to conduct their research thoroughly before making any commitments.

“So many [places] open when the numbers don’t make sense,” said Archer. “Look into the finances. If the monthly rent does not make sense, it is telling you not to go into it.”

“Every job counts,” said Jessie Lee, Director of Small Business Lending-East.

“Every job counts,” said Jessie Lee, Director of Small Business Lending-East.

Jessie Lee, Director of Small Business Lending-East, at the Tri-State Business Opportunity Fund, which operates in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, said her company was able to provide affordable financing.

Loans ranged from $50,000 to $500,000.

“A very typical candidate [for a loan] is a restaurant owner, with a year or two in business,” explained Lee, adding that such individuals were still establishing their businesses and often needed financing to expand services such as getting a liquor license.

She said it was important to give opportunities to small businesses, including start-ups, as they created employment.

“For every $50,000 we lend, one full-time job is created,” she said. “That is huge. In a community that is struggling, every job counts.”

“We provide loans based on character instead of credit score,” explained Emily Gutman, Program Fellow at KIVA, which focuses on micro-loans as little as $25, to help create opportunity around the world.

Gustavo Pérez Eugui, Manager of Lending for New York and New Jersey at Acción, echoed the vitality of support for those who fall outside the typical lending profiles.

“We lend to those who cannot access bank funding due to lack of financial records, or credit history,” said Eugui, noting that the ability to repay and the borrower’s business trajectory was what the Acción lending team looked at most carefully.

“We try to be pretty flexible,” said Gustavo Pérez Eugui, Manager of Lending for New York and New Jersey at Acción.

“We try to be pretty flexible,” said Gustavo Pérez Eugui, Manager of Lending for New York and New Jersey at Acción.

“But we try to be pretty flexible,” he assured.

Attendees said they’d been heartened by the discussion on potential financing and capital resources.

Marmolejos said she would persist.

Despite the various challenges, the would-be restaurant owner was not discouraged.

“It is very hard,” she acknowledged. “But I still want to do it.”

Harlem Community Development Corporation

212.961.4100

www.harlemcdc.org

 

Accion

866.245.0783

us.accion.org

 

New York Women’s Chamber of Commerce

212.491.9640

www.nywcc.org

 

Small Business Lending-East – Tri-State Business Opportunity Fund

212.231.4310

http://www.vedc.org/financing/

 

KIVA

415.857.8668

www.kiva.org

Competir por lo posible

Historia y fotos por Mónica Barnkow

A recent forum focused on challenges and opportunities for small businesses.

El foro se centró en los retos y oportunidades para las pequeñas empresas.

Miriam Marmolejos, residente de East Harlem, pensó haber tenido éxito logrando un agradable acuerdo de alquiler para un espacio comercial.

Pero ahora, se le dice que siga adelante.

“El dueño me está haciendo pasar un mal rato”, dijo Marmolejos,  inmigrante de la República Dominicana. El contrato de arrendamiento de 10 años por un espacio en Long Island City, Queens, es donde había planeado abrir su primer restaurante y contratar a unos 15 empleados.

En cambio, está luchando en la corte con su casero, quien, dijo, tiene la intención de desalojarla de la propiedad y cobrar el doble a un nuevo inquilino.

Por otra parte, Marmolejos, quien también es contadora, afirmó que la propiedad ha tenido renovaciones por un valor de unos $250,000 dólares que ella ha pagado por su cuenta. El propietario no ha proporcionado ayuda financiera, ni una reducción de la renta, por el costo de las reparaciones.

“We try to be pretty flexible,” said Gustavo Pérez Eugui, Manager of Lending for New York and New Jersey at Acción.

“Tratamos de ser muy flexibles”, dijo Gustavo Pérez Eugui, gerente de préstamos para Nueva York y Nueva Jersey de Acción.

Compartió sus preocupaciones con compañeros dueños de pequeños negocios en un foro celebrado el pasado martes 19 de mayo. “Hacer negocios en NYC” fue organizado por la Corporación de Desarrollo Comunitario de Harlem (HCDC por sus siglas en inglés), en colaboración con Acción, una organización nacional sin fines de lucro cuya misión es ayudar a los empresarios a utilizar microcréditos para construir sus negocios.

Fundada en 1995, HCDC planea y facilita una amplia gama de iniciativas de revitalización de la comunidad en todo el norte de Manhattan.

El martes, el panel de expertos en finanzas de las organizaciones líderes de préstamo sin fines de lucro, respondió a las inquietudes planteadas por los propietarios de negocios y empresarios locales.

Quenia Abreu, presidenta de la Cámara de Comercio de las Mujeres de Nueva York (NYWCC por sus siglas en inglés), una organización enfocada en ayudar a las mujeres y las minorías a alcanzar la independencia económica a través del desarrollo de pequeños negocios, la propiedad de microempresas y el autoempleo, participó como moderadora.

Quenia Abreu is President of The New York Women’s Chamber of Commerce (NYWCC).

Quenia Abreu, presidenta de la Cámara de Comercio de las Mujeres de Nueva York (NYWCC por sus siglas en inglés).

“Las pequeñas empresas son el verdadero motor económico de la ciudad de Nueva York”, argumentó. “Combinadas, son el mayor empleador, brindando la mayoría de los puestos de trabajo en la ciudad”.

Sin embargo, lamentó Abreu, a pesar de su positivo impacto económico, los pequeños negocios siguen enfrentándose a enormes obstáculos, incluyendo alquileres excesivamente altos, estrictos reglamentos y multas y la dificultad en el acceso al capital necesario para crecer y expandirse.

“Es por ello que este tipo de foro es tan importante”, agregó. “Tenemos muchos recursos pero nuestros propietarios de negocios tienen que conocerlos para poder aprovecharlos”.

En lo alto de la lista de los desafíos estaba el adquirir y mantener rentas razonables para el espacio comercial.

Un informe reciente de la presidenta del condado de Manhattan Gale Brewer, titulado “Oportunidades de expansión para los escaparates de Manhattan”, también hizo notar cómo las rentas crecientes están poniendo en peligro la sostenibilidad de las pequeñas empresas.

“[Recientemente], los neoyorquinos han visto que sucede algo diferente: están cerrando negocios que habían resistido la prueba del tiempo y disfrutaban de una clientela saludable del barrio y la ciudad circundante. La razón: los aumentos a gran escala en los alquileres comerciales”, indicó el informe.

El presidente de HCDC, Curtis Archer, convino en que los altos alquileres crean un ambiente prohibitivo para los empresarios y dueños de negocios, e instó a los presentes a realizar una investigación a fondo antes de hacer cualquier compromiso.

“Look into the finances,” counseled HCDC President Curtis Archer.

“Observen las finanzas”, aconsejo el presidente de HCDC, Curtis Archer.

“Tantos [lugares] abren cuando los números no tienen sentido”, dijo Archer. “Observen las finanzas. Si la renta mensual no tiene sentido, les está diciendo que no lleguen a un acuerdo”.

Jessie Lee, directora de préstamos para pequeños negocios del este, del Fondo Tri-estatal de Oportunidades de Negocios, que opera en Nueva York, Chicago y Los Ángeles, dijo que su compañía puede ofrecer financiamiento asequible.

Los préstamos van desde $50,000 hasta $500,000 dólares.

“Un muy típico candidato [para un préstamo] es dueño de un restaurante, con uno o dos años en el negocio”, explicó Lee, añadiendo que esas personas aún están estableciendo sus negocios y, a menudo necesitan financiamiento para ampliar algunos servicios, como conseguir una licencia de licores.

Ella dijo que es importante dar oportunidades a los pequeños negocios, entre ellos las start-ups, ya que crean empleos.

“Por cada $50,000 dólares que prestamos, se crea un puesto de trabajo a tiempo completo”, dijo. “Eso es enorme. En una comunidad que está luchando, cada trabajo cuenta”.

“Ofrecemos préstamos basados en el carácter en lugar de la calificación de crédito”, explicó Emily Gutman es la encargada como “Fellow” de Programación en KIVA, que se centra en microcréditos tan pequeños como $25 dólares para ayudar a crear oportunidades en todo el mundo.

Emily Gutman is the Program Fellow at KIVA, which focuses on micro-loans.

Emily Gutman es la encargada como “Fellow” de Programación en KIVA.

Gustavo Pérez Eugui, gerente de préstamos para Nueva York y Nueva Jersey de Acción, hizo eco de la vitalidad del apoyo a los que caen fuera de los perfiles típicos de préstamo.

“Hacemos préstamos a los que no pueden acceder al financiamiento bancario por falta de registros financieros o historial de crédito”, dijo Eugui, señalando que la capacidad de pagar y la trayectoria empresarial del prestatario es lo que el equipo de préstamos de Acción observa más detenidamente.

“Tratamos de ser muy flexibles”, aseguró.

Los asistentes dijeron haber sido alentados por la discusión sobre posibles recursos de financiamiento y capital.

Marmolejos dijo que persistirá.

A pesar de los diversos retos, la aspirante a propietaria de un restaurante no se desanimó.

“Es muy difícil”, reconoció. “Pero aun quiero hacerlo”.

Harlem Community Development Corporation

212.961.4100

www.harlemcdc.org

 

Accion

866.245.0783

us.accion.org

 

New York Women’s Chamber of Commerce

212.491.9640

www.nywcc.org

 

Small Business Lending-East – Tri-State Business Opportunity Fund

212.231.4310

http://www.vedc.org/financing/

 

KIVA

415.857.8668

www.kiva.org