¡Viva Broadway! panel explores Latino presence

¡Viva Broadway! Panel explora la presencia latina

  • English
  • Español

¡Viva Broadway! panel explores Latino presence

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

A panel discussion on Latinos on and off Broadway was held.

A panel discussion on Latinos on and off Broadway was held.

Retiree Andrés Rodríguez is a big fan of Broadway.

Some of his favorite productions to date have been The Lion King and Fela.

But in his younger days, when he was a young student at the Metropolitan Performing Arts Academy, he would have liked to see more.

“The Latino roles always had a little crime and havoc—never anything that was portrayed in a positive light. There was always some type of craziness,” said Rodríguez.

Decades later, some of the same concerns linger still.

“I still don’t see a lot of Latinos in theater.”

But on Wed., Aug. 14th, he had the opportunity to see at least five participate on a panel discussion about the growing influence of Latinos on and off Broadway.

The discussion was held at The New York Times building and was moderated by Tanzina Vega, a media reporter for the paper. The event was sponsored by The New York Times, the Association for the Advancement of Retired People (AARP), and ¡Viva Broadway!.

Moderator Tanzina Vega.

Moderator Tanzina Vega.

Viva Broadway, created by the Broadway League, the national trade association for the Broadway industry, as an audience development partnership with the Latino community. It seeks to help bridge the world of Broadway with Latino audiences around the country.

The panelists were Gabriela García, Founder and Director of the theater organization Revolución Latina; Quiara Alegría Hudes, 2012 Pulitzer Prize winner for Water by the Spoonful; Lin-Manuel Miranda, the Tony and Grammy Award-winning tour de force behind In the Heights; Luis Salgado, Founder and Artistic Director of Revolución Latina and Sergio Trujillo, the director and choreographer of Jersey Boys, Memphis and Hands on a Hardbody.

Rodríguez’s fiancée, Lolette González, found out about the event through AARP.

“I thought this could help him reconnect,” she said. “I would love to see him perform [again].”

Apparently, Rodríguez already performs at home, singing show tunes with González’s daughter.

The discussion soon, however, delved beyond melodies.

“I still don’t see a lot of Latinos in theater,” said Andrés Rodríguez, with fiancée, Lolette González.

“I still don’t see a lot of Latinos in theater,” said Andrés Rodríguez, with fiancée, Lolette González.

The five participants presented an animated discussion that assessed the current status of Latinos on Broadway and possibilities for the future.

They agreed on one thing: a lot of work was needed.

Vega asked the panelists to rate the current status of Latinos and theater.

“I think we are at a 5. I think we’re on that (upward) trajectory, but we’re not there yet,” said Miranda.

Trujillo noted that In the Heights had provided, literally a high point in gainfully employing a host of diverse actors and shining a spotlight on stories that are often overlooked.

“I think we were at a 9 or 10 at some point,” he said, citing the production’s 3-year Broadway run.

While all agreed that In the Heights, written by Miranda and Hudes, had proven a benchmark, subsequent productions in the same vein have not achieved similar status.

Panelists argued for a greater emphasis on supporting artists and creative workers long before they reach the stage.

And as was noted, it makes economic sense.

“When you give kids an opportunity, there is change,” said Luis Salgado, Founder and Artistic Director of Revolución Latina with Gabriela García, the organization’s Director.

“When you give kids an opportunity, there is change,” said Luis Salgado, Founder and Artistic Director of Revolución Latina with Gabriela García, the organization’s Director.

Latinos represent a growth market, in comprising 5.5 million of the population in the tri-state area and over 50 million in the U.S. and growing.

The more Latino-oriented productions there are, said the panelists, the more jobs there will be for a broader, more diverse cross-section of the general population.

“There needs to be a steady stream of work. It can’t be every two years,” said Hudes.

While not specifically Latino-oriented, Miranda’s next project, The Hamilton Mixtape, a hip-hop musical about the life of Alexander Hamilton, will provide opportunities for people of color to play historical figures such as Hamilton and George Washington.

“I want to establish the precedent that anyone can play any role in American history. It’s our history too,” said Miranda.

The premise, insisted panelists, is that there must be a consistent pipeline in which writers focus on Latino stories and issues of interest, so that there are continuous opportunities both on and off stage.

“There needs to be a steady stream of work,” said Pulitzer Prize winner Quiara Alegría Hudes.

“There needs to be a steady stream of work,” said Pulitzer Prize winner Quiara Alegría Hudes.

It is what Revolución Latina, an organization that employs the disciplines of theater, dance and art to engage and empower youth, aims to accomplish.

“When you give kids an opportunity, there is change,” said Salgado.

Another deterrent raised was the exorbitant price of tickets.

Based on the Broadway League’s own 2011-2012 “Who Goes to Broadway? The Demographics of the Broadway Audience” profile, the average ticket-buyer on Broadway has an annual household income of $193,800.

By comparison, the median household income of New Yorkers is $49,461, according to 2011 Census data.

The median household income of Washington Heights in 2010 was even less, coming in at $35,844.

The price of tickets explains why 63.4 percent of Broadway theater goers were tourists. “Something’s gotta give on that front,” said Miranda.

For more information on the Viva Broadway initiative, please visit www.broadwayleague.com/index.php?url_identifier=viva-broadway.

¡Viva Broadway! Panel explora la presencia latina

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Se celebró una mesa redonda sobre la participación latina en Broadway.

Se celebró una mesa redonda sobre la participación latina en Broadway.

El retirado Andrés Rodríguez es un gran fanático de Broadway.

Algunas de sus producciones favoritas hasta hoy son The Lion King y Fela.

En sus años mozos, cuando era un joven estudiante en la Metropolitan Performing Arts Academy, le hubiera gustado ver más.

“Los roles latinos siempre han tenido un poco de delincuencia y caos, nunca nada que se retratara bajo una luz positiva. Siempre había algún tipo de locura”, dijo Rodríguez.

Décadas más tarde, algunos de los mismos problemas persisten aún.

“Todavía no veo una gran cantidad de latinos en el teatro”.

Pero el miércoles 14 de agosto, tuvo la oportunidad de ver al menos a cinco participar en una mesa redonda sobre la creciente influencia de los latinos dentro y fuera de Broadway.

La discusión tuvo lugar en el edificio de The New York Times y fue moderada por Tanzina Vega, una reportera de medios para el periódico. El evento fue auspiciado por The New York Times, la Asociación para el Progreso de las Personas Retiradas (AARP por sus siglas en inglés) y ¡Viva Broadway!

Moderadora Tanzina Vega.

Moderadora Tanzina Vega.

Viva Broadway, creada por Broadway League, la asociación comercial nacional para la industria de Broadway, como una asociación de desarrollo del público con la comunidad latina. Busca ayudar a presentar el mundo de Broadway a la audiencia latina en todo el país.

Los panelistas fueron: Gabriela García, fundadora y directora de la organización teatral Revolución Latina; Quiara Alegría Hudes, ganadora en 2012 del premio Pulitzer por Water by the Spoonful; y Lin-Manuel Miranda, el ganador de los premios Tony y Grammy y la hazaña detrás de In the Heights; Luis Salgado, fundador y director artístico de Revolución Latina y Sergio Trujillo, director y coreógrafo de Jersey Boys, Memphis y Hands on a Hardbody.

La prometida de Rodríguez, Lolette González, se enteró del evento a través de AARP.

“Pensé que esto podría ayudarle a reconectarse”, dijo. “Me encantaría verlo actuar [de nuevo]”.

Al parecer, Rodríguez todavía realiza presentaciones en casa, cantando canciones del espectáculo con la hija de González.

La discusión, sin embargo, se adentró más allá de las melodías.

"Todavía no veo una gran cantidad de latinos en el teatro", dijo Andrés Rodríguez, con su prometida Lolette González.

“Todavía no veo una gran cantidad de latinos en el teatro”, dijo Andrés Rodríguez, con su prometida Lolette González.

Los cinco participantes presentaron una animada discusión que evaluó la situación actual de los latinos en Broadway y las posibilidades para el futuro.

Estuvieron de acuerdo en una cosa: se necesita mucho trabajo.

Vega pidió a los panelistas evaluar la situación actual de los latinos y el teatro.

“Creo que estamos en un 5. Creo que estamos en esa trayectoria (hacia arriba), pero no estamos allí todavía “, dijo Miranda.

Trujillo hizo notar que In the Heights había proporcionado, literalmente, un punto alto en el empleo remunerado a una gran cantidad de diversos actores e hizo brillar un foco en las historias que a menudo se pasan por alto.

“Creo que estábamos en un 9 o 10 en algún momento”, dijo, citando a la producción que se ha presentado durante 3 años en Broadway.

Mientras que todos estuvieron de acuerdo en que In the Heights, escrita por Miranda y Hudes, había demostrado un punto de referencia, las producciones posteriores en el mismo sentido no han logrado un estatus similar.

Los panelistas argumentaron a favor de un mayor énfasis en el apoyo a los artistas y trabajadores creativos mucho antes de que lleguen al escenario.

Y como se observó, tiene sentido económico.

"Cuando le das a los chicos una oportunidad, hay un cambio", dijo Luis Salgado, fundador y director artístico de  Revolución Latina, junto con Gabriela García, directora de la organización.

“Cuando le das a los chicos una oportunidad, hay un cambio”, dijo Luis Salgado, fundador y director artístico de Revolución Latina, junto con Gabriela García, directora de la organización.

Los latinos representan un mercado en crecimiento, el cual comprende 5.5 millones de la población en el área tri estatal y más de 50 millones en los Estados Unidos.

Y sigue creciendo.

Entre más producciones con orientación latina haya, dijeron los panelistas, más puestos de trabajo habrá para una sección más amplia y diverso de la población general.

“Es necesario que haya un flujo constante de trabajo. No puede ser cada dos años “, dijo Hudes.

Aunque no específicamente de orientación latina, el próximo proyecto de Miranda, The Hamilton Mixtape, un musical hip-hop sobre la vida de Alexander Hamilton, proporcionará oportunidades para la gente de color para reproducir figuras históricas como Hamilton y George Washington.

“Quiero establecer el precedente de que cualquier persona puede representar cualquier papel en la historia de Estados Unidos. Es también nuestra historia”, dijo Miranda.

La premisa, insistieron los panelistas, es que debe haber un proyecto consistente en que los escritores se centren en historias latinas y temas de interés, para que haya continuas oportunidades tanto dentro como fuera del escenario.

"Es necesario que haya un flujo constante de trabajo", dijo la ganadora del Premio Pulitzer Quiara Alegría Hudes.

“Es necesario que haya un flujo constante de trabajo”, dijo la ganadora del Premio Pulitzer Quiara Alegría Hudes.

Es lo que Revolución Latina, una organización que utiliza las disciplinas del teatro, danza y arte para involucrar y capacitar a los jóvenes, tiene como objetivo lograr.

“Cuando le das a los niños una oportunidad, hay un cambio”, dijo Salgado.

Otro elemento de disuasión fue el precio exorbitante de los boletos.

Basado en los resultados de “¿Quién va a Broadway? 2011-2012” de la Liga Broadway, y de acuerdo con “la demografía de la audiencia de Broadway” el perfil del comprador promedio de boletos en Broadway tiene un ingreso anual de $193,800 dólares.

En comparación, el ingreso familiar promedio de los neoyorquinos es $49,461 dólares, de acuerdo con datos del Censo 2011.

El ingreso medio por hogar de Washington Heights en 2010 fue aún menos, llegando a $35,844 dólares.

El precio de las entradas explica que el 63.4 por ciento de los asistentes a los teatros de Broadway fuesen turistas.

“Alguien tiene que ceder en ese frente”, dijo Miranda.

Para más información sobre la iniciativa Viva Broadway, por favor visite www.broadwayleague.com/index.php?url_identifier=viva-broadway.