LocalNewsPolitics/GovernmentPublic Safety

Trepidation about the terminal
Agitación por la terminal

Trepidation about the terminal

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


Elected officials gathered at the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal to voice concerns over the facility’s ongoing renovation.
Elected officials gathered at the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal to voice concerns over the facility’s ongoing renovation.

For many daily commuters and visitors to Manhattan, the George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal serves as the gateway to New York City.

But to a number of people uptown, the terminal is a source of stress and concern.

Northern Manhattan elected officials, together with residents and community leaders, gathered in Washington Heights on Fri., May 16th to voice concerns over the ongoing renovation of the terminal.

A $183 million remodeling project, which began in late 2013 after numerous delays, will modernize the aging facility, providing additional bus gates and retail space.

But lawmakers charge that the project is forging ahead without proper input from the community, which must bear the brunt of construction issues such as increased traffic congestion and noise.

Standing on the corner of 179th Street and Fort Washington Avenue, New York State Senator Adriano Espaillat, Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez, and Assemblymembers Gabriela Rosa and Assembly Member Herman D. Farrell were joined by Community Board 12 representatives, local citizens and organizations such as Make the Road New York, La Fuente and the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR).

"We are not lesser New Yorkers," said Assemblymember Gabriela Rosa.
“We are not lesser New Yorkers,” said Assemblymember Gabriela Rosa.

They protested what they said is a lack of responsiveness from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns and operates the terminal, and from developers Tutor Perini Corporation and SJM Partners.

“When renovations began, the community was left out entirely,” argued Councilmember Rodríguez, who is the City Council’s Transportation Committee Chair.

“Noise, pollution and traffic will be made worse during construction, and it’s already bad,” he added, as car horns blared behind him.

And there are other concerns.

Specifically, elected officials are asking for the guarantee of a living wage for employees at the terminal’s new retail stores, increased public space within the revitalized building, and a new traffic study funded by the Port Authority.

Retail space at the terminal will be increased to 120,000 square feet, and include large chain stores such as Marshalls and Key Food.

Though the stores will bring jobs into the neighborhood, officials expressed concern that only minimum-wage work will be available, and that no small, minority-owned businesses will be added.

From left to right: Assemblymember Herman “Denny” Farrell, Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and Community Board 12 Chair George Fernández.
From left to right: Assemblymember Herman “Denny” Farrell, Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and Community Board 12 Chair George Fernández.

“The developers have not thought outside the box to bring something other than minimum-wage jobs and big chain stores to the community,” said Councilmember Rodríguez.

“Living wage has to be a priority,” said Lucia Gómez-Jiménez, Director of La Fuente, a labor and immigrant advocacy group. “People cannot survive on the wages they are making in this city.”

Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Council for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR), said that people who come to her organization for help make an average annual salary of $15,000 per year.

“New York cannot continue with this wage model,” said Sen. Espaillat.

The bus terminal’s second-floor concourse, previously used for job fairs, exhibitions and local events, will be replaced entirely by stores.

Councilmember Rodríguez stated that the Port Authority has offered 400 square feet of community space within the new terminal.

“That’s not enough,” he said. “We want 10,000 square feet of public space, which can be used for art displays, educational programs, employment assistance and more.”

Another gripe of lawmakers is that construction at the terminal will require the closing of an underground tunnel leading to the A train, forcing commuters to walk outside to access the subway.

Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Council for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR).
Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Council for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR).

“In bad weather, people can walk through the terminal now to get to the train,” said Sen. Espaillat. “They won’t be able to do that anymore.”

There will also be a drastic reduction of street width around the terminal to accommodate construction vehicles.

Councilmember Rodríguez said that a traffic study had been promised but has not yet occurred, and that he wanted the Port Authority to pick up the study’s $500,000 price tag.

“I don’t understand why it hasn’t happened,” said Assemblymember Rosa of the traffic study. She called the delay a show of disrespect to the Washington Heights community.

“We are not lesser New Yorkers,” she remarked.

Local residents said that that traffic congestion and noise are already a concern, and will only be exacerbated by the construction, which is scheduled to finish in 2015.

Bob Isaac, who lives near the terminal, said that during Friday afternoons at rush hour, buses are backed up along 179th Street, bringing traffic to a standstill.

“The exhaust fumes are really bad,” he remarked. “And when the buses are lined up, it blocks the views of pedestrians, making it harder to cross the street.”

Sen. Adriano Espaillat.
Sen. Adriano Espaillat.

Elsa Jiminez, a resident of 179th Street, agreed that gridlock and noise were a problem.

“It’s so loud, especially at rush hour,” she commented.

Jiminez said she could accept those annoyances if the renovated bus terminal provided good jobs to the community.

“But they should make sure they are decent jobs,” she added.

Sen. Espaillat referenced the recent spate of controversies for the Port Authority, and suggested that the organization could improve its public image if it does right by the Washington Heights community.

“This is the time for the Port Authority to redeem itself,” he said.

A meeting between developers and lawmakers is planned for May 28th.

“We hope to make progress then on these issues,” said Rosa.

In response to inquiries made by The Manhattan Times, Port Authority spokesperson Erica Dumas responded that the various issues highlighted by local officials and residents are being reviewed.

“We are committed to addressing their concerns,” she said.  “We will continue to meet with elected officials, as we have throughout this process.”

Agitación por la terminal

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

La construcción de la terminal requerirá el cierre de este túnel subterráneo que conduce al tren A.
La construcción de la terminal requerirá el cierre de este túnel subterráneo que conduce al tren A.

Para muchos viajeros diarios y visitantes de Manhattan, la terminal de autobuses del puente George Washington sirve como puerta de entrada a la ciudad de Nueva York.

Pero para un número de personas del norte del condado, la terminal es una fuente de estrés y preocupación.

Funcionarios electos del norte de Manhattan, junto con residentes y líderes de la comunidad, se reunieron en Washington Heights el viernes 16 de mayo para expresar sus inquietudes sobre el desarollo de la Terminal del GWB.

Un proyecto de remodelación de $183 millones, que comenzó a finales de 2013 después de numerosos retrasos, modernizará la envejecida instalación, proporcionando puertas adicionales para autobuses y espacio comercial.

Pero los legisladores acusan que el proyecto sigue adelante sin la participación adecuada de la comunidad, que debe soportar los problemas de la construcción, tales como el aumento del tráfico y el ruido.

De pie en la esquina de la calle 179 y la avenida Fort Washington, el senador del estado de Nueva York Adriano Espaillat, el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez, y los asambleístas Gabriela Rosa y Herman D. Farrell, estaban acompañados por representantes de la Junta Comunitaria 12, ciudadanos locales y organizaciones, tales como Make the Road New York, la Fuente y la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés).

"El salario de subsistencia tiene que ser una prioridad", dijo Lucía Gómez-Jiménez, directora de La Fuente.
“El salario de subsistencia tiene que ser una prioridad”, dijo Lucía Gómez-Jiménez, directora de La Fuente.

Protestaron por lo que dijeron es el silencio de la Autoridad Portuaria de Nueva York y Nueva Jersey, que posee y opera la terminal, y de los desarrolladores, Tutor Perini Corporation y SJM Partners a sus demandas.

“Cuando comenzaron las renovaciones, la comunidad quedó fuera por completo”, sostuvo el concejal Rodríguez, quien es el presidente del Comité de Transporte del Concejo de la ciudad.

“El ruido, la contaminación y el tráfico empeorarán durante la construcción, y ahora es muy  malo”, añadió, mientras las bocinas de los coches sonaban detrás de él.

Y hay otras preocupaciones.

Específicamente, los funcionarios electos están pidiendo la garantía de un salario digno para los empleados de las nuevas tiendas de la terminal, el aumento de espacio público dentro del edificio revitalizado, y un nuevo estudio de tráfico, financiado por la Autoridad Portuaria.

El espacio comercial en la terminal se incrementará a 120 mil pies cuadrados, e incluye grandes cadenas de tiendas como Marshalls y Key Food.

Aunque las tiendas traerán empleos al barrio, los funcionarios expresaron su preocupación de que solamente habrá trabajo de salario mínimo y que no se añadirán pequeños negocios propiedad de minorías.

El senador Adriano Espaillat.
El senador Adriano Espaillat.

“Los desarrolladores no han pensado de forma original para traer algo más que trabajos de salario mínimo y grandes almacenes de cadena a la comunidad”, dijo el concejal Rodríguez.

“El salario de subsistencia tiene que ser una prioridad”, dijo Lucía Gómez-Jiménez, directora de La Fuente, un grupo de trabajo y de defensa de inmigrantes. “Las personas no pueden sobrevivir con los salarios de esta ciudad”.

Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva del Consejo del Norte de Manhattan por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés), dijo que las personas que acuden a su organización en busca de ayuda tienen un salario promedio anual de $15,000  dólares.

“Nueva York no puede continuar con este modelo de salarios”, dijo el senador Espaillat.

El vestíbulo del segundo piso de la terminal de autobuses, previamente utilizado para ferias de trabajo, exposiciones y eventos locales, será completamente reemplazado por tiendas.

El concejal Rodríguez afirmó que la Autoridad Portuaria ha ofrecido 400 pies cuadrados de espacio comunitario dentro de la nueva terminal.

“Eso no es suficiente”, dijo. “Queremos 10,000 metros cuadrados de espacio público que pueda ser utilizado para exhibiciones de arte, programas educativos, asistencia de empleo y más”.

Otra queja de los legisladores es que la construcción de la Terminal requerirá el cierre de un túnel subterráneo que conduce al tren A, obligando a los pasajeros a salir para tener acceso al metro.

Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva del Consejo del Norte de Manhattan por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés).
Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva del Consejo del Norte de Manhattan por los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés).

“Con mal tiempo, la gente hoy puede caminar a través de la terminal para llegar al tren”, dijo el senador Espaillat. “No serán capaces de hacerlo”.

También habrá una reducción drástica de la anchura de la calle alrededor de la Terminal para dar cabida a los vehículos de construcción.

El concejal Rodríguez dijo que un estudio de tráfico fue prometido, pero aún no ha ocurrido, y que quería que la Autoridad Portuaria recogiera el estudio de $500,000 dólares.

“No entiendo por qué no ha ocurrido”, dijo la asambleísta Rosa sobre el estudio de tráfico. Ella llamó a la demora una falta de respeto a la comunidad de Washington Heights.

“Nosotros no somos menos neoyorquinos”, comentó.

Residentes locales dijeron que el tráfico y el ruido ya son una preocupación, y sólo se verán exacerbados por la construcción, la cual está programada para terminar en 2015.

Bob Isaac, quien vive cerca de la terminal, dijo que durante las tardes del viernes en las horas pico, los autobuses son alineados a lo largo de la calle 179, con lo que el tráfico queda detenido.

“Los humos del escape son muy malos”, remarcó, “Y cuando los autobuses están alineados, bloquean la vista de los peatones, lo que hace más difícil cruzar la calle”.

De izquierda a derecha: asambleísta Herman “Denny” Farrell, concejal Ydanis Rodríguez y presidente de la Junta Comunitaria 12, George Fernández.
De izquierda a derecha: asambleísta Herman “Denny” Farrell, concejal Ydanis Rodríguez y presidente de la Junta Comunitaria 12, George Fernández.

Elsa Jiménez, residente de la calle 179, estuvo de acuerdo en que los embotellamientos y el ruido son un problema.

“Es tan fuerte, sobre todo en la hora pico”, comentó.

Jiménez dijo que puede aceptar esas molestias si la terminal de autobuses renovada provee buenos trabajos para la comunidad.

“Pero deben asegurarse de que son trabajos decentes”, añadió.

El senador Espaillat se refirió a la reciente ola de controversias de la Autoridad Portuaria, y sugirió que la organización podría mejorar su imagen pública si lo hace junto a la comunidad de Washington Heights.

“Este es el momento de la Autoridad Portuaria para redimirse a sí misma”, dijo.

Está prevista una reunión entre los desarrolladores y los legisladores el 28 de mayo.

“Esperamos poder avanzar entonces sobre estos temas”, dijo Rosa.

En respuesta a las preguntas formuladas por The Manhattan Times, la vocera de la Autoridad Portuaria, Érica Dumas, respondió que las diversas cuestiones destacadas por los funcionarios locales y los residentes están siendo revisadas.

“Tenemos el compromiso de hacer frente a sus preocupaciones”, dijo. “Seguiremos reuniéndonos con los funcionarios electos, como lo hemos hecho durante todo este proceso”.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker