Traveling far to see ‘fracking’ up close 
Viajando para ver de cerca  ‘fracturación hidráulica’

  • English
  • Español

Traveling far to see ‘fracking’ up close 

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

Video by Sherry Mazzocchi

State Senator Espaillat led a visit by local residents and environmental activists, including Vera Scruggins (left), to Pennsylvania to learn about effects of hydro-fracking.

State Senator Espaillat led a visit by local
residents and environmental activists, including
Vera Scruggins (left), to Pennsylvania to learn
about effects of hydro-fracking.

When Tammy and Matt Manning moved into their Susquehanna County home in 2010, they thought it was the American Dream.

But it turned into a nightmare.

After a year, their well water started to bubble.

Water in their toilet turned a dark gray. High levels of methane and other toxic chemicals made their water not only undrinkable, but also dangerous.

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection told them to keep their water running so their well wouldn’t erupt.

At first they didn’t notice any side effects.

But soon their granddaughter, who slept in a room above the running water, regularly woke up vomiting.

Matt Manning said their water was a toxic stew of dangerous chemicals—with unacceptable levels of methane, arsenic, lithium, aluminum, manganese, barium and iron.

“There was so much methane in our water that when you turned the faucet on in the house, it was 90 percent air, the other 10 percent, maybe water,” he said.

Signs outside of a home in Pennsylvania visited by residents of northern Manhattan and activists to view first-hand some of the impact of “hydraulic fracturing,” or fracking.

Signs outside of a home in Pennsylvania visited by residents of northern Manhattan and activists to view first-hand some of the impact of “hydraulic fracturing,” or fracking.

The Mannings told their story to Sen. Adriano Espaillat and a group of about 35 residents of northern Manhattan and environmental activists this past Sun., Aug. 26th.

Sen. Espaillat accompanied the group to Pennsylvania to witness the impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, as it is has been named by some, on a rural and largely unregulated environment.

“We feel that in New York City, we are so far from this it can not impact us. But, in fact, it can,” he said.

Sen. Espaillat fears the destruction of the watershed feeding the city’s water supply and devastation of upstate environments.

Todd Manning must buy bottled water for drinking and cooking.

Todd Manning must buy bottled water for
drinking and cooking.

“We want to ask Governor Cuomo to stop and not permit this to go forward,” he said.

Last Friday, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said he backs fracking. The Mayor donated $6 million of his personal fortune to the Environmental Defense Fund to write “responsible” legislation governing the protection of water supplies.

Sen. Espaillat said he wasn’t surprised by Bloomberg’s announcement.

“He’s a big business guy and that’s how he looks at the world,” he said. “I look at the world differently, as I think many New Yorkers should.”

Gov. Cuomo is has yet to decide whether fracking is allowed in New York State. Earlier in the year, Gov. Cuomo proposed using Broome County, which sits on an abundant section of the Marcellus Shale, as a testing ground

The Mannings live in Franklin Township in Pennsylvania’s Northern Tier, not far from Broome County. Four other families on his street have water problems.

“And those are just the ones that have spoken up,” Manning said.

An ongoing lawsuit prevents him from disclosing the company that drilled the well.  But signs proclaiming Cabot Oil & Gas wells, pipelines and brine tanks spring up across the area.

The Mannings’ well is permanently capped.

Tammy Manning showed northern Manhattan resident (far right) Cheryl Pahaham a collection of press reports about the problems they’ve had with their well.

Tammy Manning showed northern Manhattan
resident (far right) Cheryl Pahaham a collection
of press reports about the problems they’ve had
with their well.

Outside their home is a water buffalo – a tank large enough to hold the 1,100 gallons of water delivered by the gas company every day.

The water comes from a local lake. It’s highly chlorinated and non-potable.

“It smells like a pool,” Vera Scruggins, a local activist, said.

The Mannings buy bottled water for drinking and cooking.

The tanks are a common site in the area. Scruggins pointed out several along rural roads.

Scruggins and Bret Jennings narrated the tour.

Jennings, councillor of Great Bend Borough, said there were 950 well permits and 400 drills in Susquehanna County.

“We see this drilling going on everywhere,” said a slightly amazed Sen. Espaillat. “Next to schools, across from homes, next to parks.”

Scruggins even pointed out a drill site next to a nursing home.

“It’s really out of control,” he remarked.

Scruggins said the area’s low population density means that local laws governing fracking are a Class 1 regulatory structure. “It’s basically self-regulation,” she said.

A sign outside a home in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.

A sign outside a home in Susquehanna County,
Pennsylvania.

While natural gas companies have seen profits, the Mannings haven’t reaped any. They never leased their property for drilling.

Their water was ruined by a well on another property close by.

“I can never sell this house,” Manning said.” I can never rent it. Nothing.”

He still has another 15 years on his mortgage.

Upper West Side resident William Avery Hudson said talking to the Mannings brought home fracking’s potential impact in New York State.

“I’ve never seen a fracking well,” he said. “It doesn’t look bad–until you talk to the people.”

Cheryl Pahaham, a northern Manhattan resident and candidate for Robert Jackson’s City Council seat, called the trip “a real eye-opener.”

“Too many people don’t know about fracking,” she said. “We have a lot of work to do.”

To hear directly from the Manning family on how they have been affected, visit http://bit.ly/MT_063.

For an interview with Sen. Espaillat on his opposition to hydro-fracking, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_064.

 

Viajando para ver de cerca ‘fracturación hidráulica’

Historia y fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

Video por Sherry Mazzocchi

A sign outside a home in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.

Un letrero fuera de una casa en Susquehanna
County en el estado de Pennsylvania.

Cuando Tammy y Matt Manning se mudaron en 2010 a su hogar en Susquehanna County, ellos pensaron que era el Sueño Americano.

Pero se convirtió en una pesadilla.

Luego de un año, su pozo se comenzó a desbordar.

El agua en su sanitario se tornó gris oscuro. Altos niveles de metano y otros químicos tóxicos tornaron su agua no solo no potable, sino peligrosa.

El Departamento de Protección Ambiental de Pennsylvania les dijo que dejasen el agua correr, para que su pozo no hiciera erupción.

En principio no notaron efecto secundario alguno.

Pero muy pronto,  con frecuencia su nieta, quien dormía en una habitación ubicada encima del agua corriente, despertaba vomitando.

Matt Manning dijo que su agua era un guiso tóxico de peligrosos químicos-con niveles inaceptables de metano, arsénico, litio, aluminio, manganeso, bario y hierro.

“Había tanto metano en nuestra agua, que cuando usted abría el grifo del agua en la casa, era 90 por ciento aire, el otro 10 por ciento tal vez, era agua”, dijo él.

Tammy Manning showed northern Manhattan resident (far right) Cheryl Pahaham a collection of press reports about the problems they’ve had with their well.

Tammy Manning le mostro a Cheryl Pahaham
(derecha extrema), residente del Alto
Manhattan, una colección de artículos sobre los
problemas con su pozo.

El domingo, 26 de agosto, los Manning relataron su historia al Senador Adriano Espaillat y a un grupo de unos 35 residentes del Norte de Manhattan y activistas medioambientales.

El Senador Espaillat acompañó al grupo a Pennsylvania, para comprobar el impacto de la fracturación hidráulica,  como ha sido denominada por algunos, en un ambiente rural y ampliamente no regulado.

“Pensamos que en la ciudad de Nueva York, estamos tan distantes que esto no puede impactarnos.  Pero en realidad, si puede”, expresó.

El Senador Espaillat teme la destrucción de la cuenca hidrográfica que alimenta al suministro de agua a la ciudad, y la devastación del medioambiente en la parte norte del estado.

“Nosotros queremos solicitar al Gobernador Cuomo que detenga e impida que esto prosiga”, expresó él.

El pasado viernes, el Alcalde Michael Bloomberg dijo que el respalda la fracturación hidráulica. El alcalde dono $6 millones de su fortuna personal al Fondo de Defensa al Medio Ambiente para que redacte una legislación “responsable” para regir la protección de las fuentes de agua.

El Senador Espaillat dijo no sorprenderle el anuncio de Bloomberg.

“El es un tipo grande en los negocios, y así es su visión del mundo”, expresó él. “Yo veo al mundo de manera diferente, como pienso que deben hacerlo la mayoría de los neoyorquinos”.

Todavía el Gobernador Cuomo tiene que decidir si la fracturación hidráulica está permitida en el estado de Nueva York. A principios de año, el gobernador Cuomo propuso utilizar como terreno de prueba a Broome County, el cual esta situado en una abundante sección de Marcellus Shale.

Todd Manning must buy bottled water for drinking and cooking.

Todd Manning necesita comprar agua
embotellada para tomar y cocinar.

Los Manning residen en Franklin Township, en Pennsylvania Northern Tier, a poca distancia de Broome County.

Otras cuatro familias en su calle tienen problemas con el agua.

“Y eso solo son aquellos que se han pronunciado”, dijo Manning.

Una demanda en curso le impide revelar la compañía que perforó ese pozo.

Pero hay letreros que proclaman a Cabot Oil & Gas pozos, tuberías y tanques de salmuera abundan por todo el área.
El pozo de los Manning está permanentemente tapado.

Frente a su hogar, hay un tanque buffalo-un tanque lo suficientemente grande para alojar los 1,100 galones de agua suministrados diariamente por la compañía de gas.

El agua proviene de un lago local. Esta altamente tratada con cloro y es no potable.

“Huele como una piscina”, dijo Vera Scruggins, una activista local.

Los Manning compran agua embotellada para tomar y cocinar.

Los tanques son algo común en el área.

Scruggins señaló hacia varios en caminos rurales.

State Senator Espaillat led a visit by local residents and environmental activists, including Vera Scruggins (left), to Pennsylvania to learn about effects of hydro-fracking.

Letreros fuera de un hogar en Pennsylvania que
fue visitada por residentes del Alto Manhattan
para comprobar el impacto de la fracturación
hidráulica.

Scruggins y Bret Jennings hicieron la narración durante el recorrido.

Jennings, concejal de Great Bend Borough, dijo que en el Condado de Susquehanna habían 950 permisos para pozos y 400 taladros.

“Vemos esta excavación en todas partes”, dijo el senador Espaillat un tanto sorprendido. “Próximo a las escuelas, frente a las casas, al lado de los parques”. Scruggins señaló un lugar de excavación al lado de una residencia de reposo.

“Esta realmente fuera de control”, señaló él.

Scruggins dijo que la baja densidad poblacional del área significa que las leyes locales que regulan la fracturación hidráulica son Clase 1 en una estructura regulatoria. “Es básicamente una auto-regulación”, dijo ella.

Mientras que las compañías de gas natural han visto los beneficios, los Manning no han visto ninguno. Nunca arrendaron su propiedad para la excavación.

El agua resultó arruinada por un pozo en otra propiedad cercana.

“Nunca podré vender esta casa”, dijo Manning.”Nunca podré rentarla. Nada”.

Aun le quedan otros 15 años en su hipoteca.

William Avery Hudson, residente del West Side dijo que el haber hablado con los Manning lo hizo conciente del potencial impacto de la fracturación hidráulica en el Estado de Nueva York.

“Yo nunca he visto un pozo de fracturación hidráulica”, dijo él. “No se ve mal-hasta que usted no habla con la gente”.

Cheryl Pahaham, residente del Norte de Manhattan y candidato a la posición de Robert Jackson en el Concejo de la Ciudad, denominó el viaje como “realmente revelador”.

“Demasiada gente no conoce lo que es fracturación hidráulica”, dijo ella. “Tenemos mucho por hacer”.

Para oír el relato directamente de la familia Manning, visite http://bit.ly/MT_063.

Para ver una entrevista con el Senador Espaillat sobre su oposición a ‘fracking’, visite http://bit.ly/MT_064.