“This is truly precious, truly being rich.”
“Esto realmente es un tesoro, realmente ser rico”.

  • English
  • Español

“This is truly precious, truly being rich.”

The Covello Center: Fighting to keep a neighborhood institution intact

Story by Debralee Santos and Sandra E. García

Photos by Sandra E. García

“This is the IPR/HE’s flagship,” said Suleika Cabrera Drinane, President and CEO. “This is our home.”

“This is the IPR/HE’s flagship,” said Suleika Cabrera Drinane, President and CEO. “This is our home.”

“This is the only place I can come and feel free,” said Ada Maldonado. “This is a gift I thought I’d never receive.”

Bronx resident Maldonado sat near a half-finished painting that she had been working on; it was, she explained, a self-portrait.

The painting class was being held at the Leonard Covello Senior Center in northern Manhattan, and is one of the dozens of programs and services offered by The Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly (IPR/HE).

As one of the largest Hispanic nonprofit organizations serving the Latino and other ethnic/racial minority seniors and their families in New York City, IPR/HE provides culturally competent information, referral and advocacy, counseling, case management, and other assistance services to seniors and their families throughout the city.

The recent news that the Covello Center in El Barrio would now be run by a different agency, the Carter Burden Center for the Aging, based on the Upper East Side, was cause for concern among the seniors gathered recently on a Thursday morning for their daily routines.

Carlos Moreno volunteers at The Leonard Covello Center. “We are doing good here [with a] great diet and lots of programs,” he said.

Carlos Moreno volunteers at The Leonard Covello Center. “We are doing good here [with a] great diet and lots of programs,” he said.

“They can’t do this to us,” said Maldonado, stifling a cry.

Since 1991, under contract with the NYC Department for the Aging, IPR/HE has provided services to a multi-racial/ethnic population of low-income and, predominantly minority, older adults at the Covello Center, located at East 109th Street in East Harlem.

The results of a recent Department for the Aging (DFTA) Solicitation Application process for the sponsorship of Neighborhood Senior Centers around the city were announced via the Internet on July 18th. Although IPR/HE had been prequalified to submit an application to continue to sponsor the Covello Center, the DFTA decided to award Covello to the Carter Burden Center, a move that perplexed many.

“For the city not to support the Institute to continue to manage the Covello Center, one of our long-standing institutions serving not just Latinos but all seniors in the community, is a travesty,” said New York State Assemblymember Robert Rodriguez. “It seems that it’s more important to write a good proposal than to have provided 16 years of good services.”

Some stakeholders have also said that the process raised more questions than answers.

José Rivera sat on the stage where he plays the guitar during the “Serenade in the Afternoon” program, where seniors play instruments and sing.

José Rivera sat on the stage where he plays the guitar during the “Serenade in the Afternoon” program, where seniors play instruments and sing.

“Anyone with writing skills can pen a solid proposal on paper,” said José Calderón, President of Hispanic Federation. “The City should award contracts on the basis of merit, experience, and cultural competency. What happened with IPR/HE has caused concern, and rightfully so, for all our member agencies.”

Many have wondered why the change from IPR/HE to an unknown agency with little apparent ties to the local community, or to the majority-Latino seniors who have considered Covello their second home for decades.

Seniors at Covello currently participate in programs such as StayWell, where they dance and exercise and the Friday Night Serenade, where participants play their favorite instrument and put on a show for their friends.

Carlos Moreno, a volunteer with the StayWell program, said that the elderly with whom he worked preferred an administration with a proven track record caring specifically for an aging Latino population, one that would better tend to its needs.

“I’ve been coming to the center for 12 years and IPR/HE is essential to the Covello Center,” said Moreno. “We are doing good here [with a] great diet and lots of programs. I am sure that the seniors would leave the center if [administrations] were switched.”

Jose Morales painted a self-portrait in which he appears as a soldier.

Jose Morales painted a self-portrait in which he appears as a soldier.

José Rivera is known as the owner of the stage at Covello, where he anxiously awaits Fridays for his time in the limelight. “I play the guitar, and bass,” said Rivera.

Rivera, who grew up in Caguas, Puerto Rico playing music recalls not having a place to play his instruments until he arrived at the center.

“’Serenade in the afternoon’ is a great program and everyone loves it. It makes me feel good. We have fun with the music, we laugh and we dance.”

The diverse group of seniors at art class draws inspiration from their memories, sketching and bringing forth colorful details onto the canvas.

May Chu drew koi fish and pagoda-style houses, while Vietnam veteran Jose Morales painted a self-portrait in his Marines uniform and Nora painted the Colombian village in which she grew up.

The seniors also extol more than the recreational activities.

Many rely on the nutritional counseling and daily exercise routines provided to keep themselves fit.

Juana Tejada could not imagine where her health would be without the Covello Center.

“I come in the morning at 8:30 a.m. for breakfast and then, from 9-10 a.m., I exercise,” said Tejada. “I also take the salsa dancing class where they play Hector Lavoe and Ismael Rivera. I have a great time here.”

Tejada was quick to point to the real benefits of her work-out.

“Because I am a diabetic, I like to be in shape [and] make sure my heart is in shape. All the exercise keeps me healthy,” said Tejada. “My weight is not heavy.  I don’t lose my breath and it’s all because of the fitness. I don’t think I could keep my diabetes in check without these exercises.”

The IPR/HE’s administrators say they are far from from having given up.

“This is the IPR/HE’s flagship,” said Suleika Cabrera Drinane, President and CEO. “The Institute was born in East Harlem and has been providing services in this community prior to having become the Covello Center sponsor in 1991. We have built this Center’s programs and services from the ground up. For us to lose sponsorship would be a travesty. This is our home.”

IPR/HE is appealing the DFTA decision and reaching out to community members and elected officials to notify them of what has occurred and enlisting their support.

And as much as the Center serves as a hub for many in the immediate community, there are some who go even farther to take advantage of the Covello Center’s specific programs.

“As Latino elderly, this place is amazing for us,” said Nora, who travels from Queens to northern Manhattan to attend her art class at Covello. “With this place, I feel like I’ve hit the lottery. This is truly precious; this is truly being rich.”

“Esto realmente es un tesoro, realmente ser rico”.

Covello Center: Luchando por mantener intacta una institución de la vecindad

Historia por Debralee Santos y Sandra E. García

Fotos por Sandra E. García

“This is the IPR/HE’s flagship,” said Suleika Cabrera Drinane, President and CEO. “This is our home.”

“Este es el buque insignia de IPR/HE”, dijo Suleika Cabrera Drinane, presidente y CEO. “Este es nuestro hogar.”

“Este es el único lugar donde puedo venir y sentirme libre”, dijo Ada Maldonado. “Este es un regalo que nunca pensé recibiría”.

Maldonado, residente del Bronx, estaba sentada cerca de una pintura a medio terminar en la cual había estado trabajando; esta era, según explicó, un autorretrato.

La clase de pintura se llevaba a cabo en el Leonard Covello Senior Center en el Norte de Manhattan, y es una de las docenas de programas y servicios que el Instituto para Personas Mayores Puertorriqueñas/Hispanas (IPR/HE por sus siglas en inglés) administra.

Siendo la mayor organización hispana sin fines de lucro que ofrece servicios en la ciudad de Nueva York a los ciudadanos de la tercera edad hispanos y de otras minorías étnico/raciales y a sus familias, IPR/HE proporciona información multilingüe/multicultural, referimiento y defensa, asesoría, manejo de casos, y otros servicios de asistencia a los de la tercera edad y sus familias en toda la ciudad.

Las noticias recientes de que en a partir de ahora,  Covello Center en El Barrio será administrado una agencia diferente, el Carter Burden Center for the Aging, con sede en el Upper East Side, fue motivo de preocupación entre los mayores de edad reunidos recientemente para sus rutinas diarias.

Carlos Moreno volunteers at The Leonard Covello Center. “We are doing good here [with a] great diet and lots of programs,” he said.

Carlos Moreno es voluntario en Leonard Covello Center. “Estamos bien aquí [con una] gran dieta y muchos programas”, dijo el.

“Ellos no pueden hacernos esto”, dijo Maldonado,  reprimiendo un sollozo.

El 19 de diciembre de 2011, el Departamento Para Personas Mayores de la Ciudad, procuró ofertas para la administración de “Centros para los mayores de edad” por toda la ciudad.

Algunos oficiales electos y partes interesadas han expresado también que el proceso ha suscitado más cuestionamientos que respuestas.

“Que la ciudad no apoye al Instituto en su administración del Covello Center, uno de nuestras instituciones de muchos años que sirve no solo a los latinos pero todos envejecientes de la comunidad, es terrible,” dijo el Asambleista Robert Rodriguez. “Parece que es más importante escribir una buena propuesta que haber proporcionado 16 años de buenos servicios.”

Varios líderes comunitarios también han dicho que el proceso planteó más preguntas que respuestas.

“Cualquier persona con habilidades de escritura puede crear buena propuesta,” dijo José Calderón, Presidente de la Federación Hispana. “La ciudad debe conceder contratos en base de mérito, de experiencia, y de capacidad cultural. Lo qué sucedió con IPR/HE ha causado preocupación legítima en todas nuestras agencias.”

José Rivera sat on the stage where he plays the guitar during the “Serenade in the Afternoon” program, where seniors play instruments and sing.

José Rivera se sienta en su escenario donde toca la guitarra para sus amigos, durante el programa “Serenata en la Tarde”, donde los de mayor edad tocan instrumentos y cantan.

Recientemente, un jueves en la mañana,  estando los de mayor edad del Centro reunidos, estos expresaron preocupación sobre el cambio a una agencia administradora desconocida la cual al parecer tiene poco vinculo con la comunidad local, o con la mayoría de las personas mayores latinas, quienes durante décadas, han considerado a Covello como un segundo hogar.

En la actualidad,  los de mayor edad del Centro participan en programas tales como Stay Well (manténgase bien),  en el cual ellos bailan y se ejercitan, y la Serenata de la Noche del Viernes, donde los participantes tocan su instrumento favorito y montan un espectáculo para sus amigos.

Carlos Moreno sirve como voluntario y asiste con el programa StayWell.

El dijo que las personas moyores con quienes ha trabajado prefieren una administración con un récord comprobado específicamente en el cuidado de la población de mayor edad latina,  una que atienda mejor sus necesidades.

“He estado viniendo al centro durante 12 años y IPR/HE es esencial para el Covello Center”, dijo Moreno. “Nosotros estamos bien aquí [con una] gran dieta y muchos programas.

“Estoy seguro de que los de mayor edad dejarían el centro si cambian [la administración]”.

José Rivera es conocido como el dueño del escenario en Covello, donde el espera ansiosamente los viernes por su momento estelar.

“Yo toco la guitarra, y el bajo”, dijo Rivera.

Rivera, quien se crió en Caguas,  Puerto Rico tocando música,  recuerda el no haber tenido un lugar donde tocar sus instrumentos hasta que llegó al Covello Center.

Jose Morales painted a self-portrait in which he appears as a soldier.

José Morales pinta un autorretrato en su uniforme de la Marina de Estados Unidos.

“Serenata en la tarde” es un gran programa y a todo el mundo le encanta. Me hace sentir bien. Nos divertimos con la música, nos reímos y bailamos”.

El diverso grupo de personas mayores en la clase de arte, buscan la inspiración en sus recuerdos, esbozando y volcando sobre el lienzo todos sus coloridos detalles.

May Chu dibuja koi fish y casas estilo pagoda, mientras que el veterano de Vietnam José Morales pinta un autorretrato en su uniforme de la Marina y Nora pinta la villa colombiana donde ella se crió.

Los de mayor edad se destacan también  en algo más que actividades recreativas.

Muchos dependen de la asesoría nutricional y rutinas diarias de ejercicios proporcionados para mantenerlos en forma.

Juana Tejada no se puede imaginar donde estaría su salud sin el Covello Center.

“Yo vengo en la mañana a las 8:30 a.m. para el desayuno, y entonces, de 9-10, yo hago ejercicios”, dijo Tejada.  “Yo tomo también clases de salsa donde tocan a Héctor Lavoe e Ismael Rivera. Yo me divierto mucho aquí”.

Tejada se apresura a señalar los verdaderos beneficios de sus ejercicios.

“Motivado a que soy diabética, me gusta estar en forma [y] asegurarme de que mi corazón está en forma. El ejercicio me mantiene saludable”, expresó Tejada. “Mi peso no es mucho. No me falta la respiración y es todo por estar en forma. Yo no creo que podría sostener mi diabetes chequeada sin estos ejercicios”.

Los administradores IPR/HE dicen que están muy lejos de darse por vencidos.

“Este centro es el buque insignia de IPR/HE”, dijo Suleika Cabrera Drinane, presidente y CEO. “Hemos estado aquí desde antes del 1991. Construimos este centro desde abajo, sería injusto que nosotros no estuviésemos en este centro. Este es nuestro hogar.”

Drinane dijo que una carta de apelación ha sido registrada con DFTA, y que ella había contactado a todos los oficiales electos a fin de notificarles sobre lo sucedido.

Y mientras que el Centro sirve como punto de reunión para muchos en la comunidad local quienes organizan sus días en torno a sus actividades, hay algunos que van aún más lejos para aprovecharse de los programas específicos del Centro.

“En mi calidad de latino de mayor de edad, para nosotros este lugar es fantástico”, dijo Nora, quien se traslada desde Queens al Norte de Manhattan para atender a su clase en Covello. “Con este lugar, me siento que he ganado la lotería. Esto es verdaderamente precioso, es ser realmente rico”.