Theater, but no show, at the United Palace Theater
En el ‘United Palace’ : Teatro sin Espectáculo

  • English
  • Español

Theater, but no show, at the United Palace Theater

Community continues push for restoration of after school funding cuts

Story and photos by Sandra E. García

Soledad Hiciano, Executive Director of ACDP, stands onstage at United Palace Theater with staff and students at a protest rally.

Soledad Hiciano, Executive Director of ACDP, stands onstage at United Palace Theater with staff and students at a protest rally.

The United Palace Cathedral was packed this past Tuesday afternoon.

Standing ovations? Check.

Musical performances? Check.

Stomping, clapping and lots of cheering? Check.

But forget any headlining musical acts.

The spotlight was, instead, trained on local families and children that would stand to lose nearly half of the neighborhoods’ after-school programs – if the Mayor’s executive budget, as proposed, is passed.

In announcing his $68.7 billion budget proposal, Mayor Bloomberg proposed cutting early childhood and after school programs – for the fifth straight year.

Local advocates have estimated that over 2 million dollars stand to be cut directly from local programs, with over 47,000 children in northern Manhattan losing child care and after school programs under the proposed budget after August 30th.

In response, local advocates have mobilized, and this past Tuesday saw a massive rally held at the United Palace Theater’s auditorium with thousands of children, families and service providers orchestrating an afternoon program with one coordinated directive to the Mayor and to the City Council: Restore the funding.

“I want to hear a pin drop; I want everyone here to be as quiet as they can,” said Soledad Hiciano Executive Director at the Community Association of Progressive Dominicans (ACDP), as she called the audience to order.

“You hear that silence?,” she said, her voice building. “That’s the noise we’ve been making for the last five years, and today we are going to let the Mayor hear us!”

Councilmember Ydanis Rodriguez, who was present at the rally, also made his stance on the budget clear. “I refuse to sign off on this budget until we get all our funding for students back,” said Councilmember Rodriguez to the packed auditorium.

“The working class in northern Manhattan has been very affected, and we need Mayor Bloomberg to find the necessary funds for after school.”

But it was the pleas that came from the youngest in the group that sounded out the loudest. “I need after school, because my mother needs someone to take care of me while she is at work,” said 10-year-old Briana Rodriguez, who stood at the podium with a worried look on her face.

The United Palace Theatre was a packed house this past Thursday with students, families, service providers and staff, and community leaders who urged for the restoration of funding.

The United Palace Theatre was a packed house this past Thursday with students, families, service providers and staff, and community leaders who urged for the restoration of funding.

“After school is great because the group leaders are always taking care of me. I need the mayor to keep the after schools and give us the money,” Rodriguez added.

Rodriguez was not the only one who was concerned.

Eight-year-old Lewis Rodriguez from P.S. 189 said he didn’t know what his teacher would say if he didn’t do his homework correctly. “I need my afterschool to stay open,” said Rodriguez (no relation to Briana).

“If it was not there, I am not going to know how to do my homework,” said the uniform-clad Rodriguez during his turn at the microphone. “And this is important for me because I always need help with my homework.” Parents in the Palace stood on their feet and cheered time and again for the students and speakers.

Many emphasized that he afterschool programs not only allow parents to leave their children in an environment that fosters learning, but also one that is safe.
“I’m fighting against the proposed budget,” said Arelis Delao, a Washington Heights resident for over 40 years whose 9-year-old son Luis Delao attends Children’s Aid Society Programs.

“There is going to be a domino effect because if this budget gets passed, we are going to have our teens in the street, and our younger ones in the street and the parents who lose their jobs will also be on the street,” stressed Delao. “The Mayor is building chaos in northern Manhattan.”

Moreover, many parents who struggle with the English language themselves are concerned that the assistance with homework and tutoring their children receive will not be aid they can supplement.

“I don’t have [funds] to pay for childcare,” explained Beatrice Torres, whose son 7-year-old Brandon Quizeno attends after school at P.S. 28. “The program helps him with his homework, [which] I don’t understand it a lot of times.”

The proposed cuts are also stirring fear that cutbacks will lead to a new wave of under and un-employment locally. Program staff members, according to Myrna Torres, Assistant Director for Division of Community Schools for the Children’s Aid Society, are right to worry.

“We have a lot of staff that will be without work and many are members of the community who are trying to get through college,” said Torres. To the mayor, Torres spoke directly, “Show that you really care about education and secure the funds.”

Advocates have continued to gather together for meeting and days of action in anticipation of the May 24th New York City Council Youth and Education budget hearing. And beyond.

“This is not going to end here,” said Angelo Ortiz,, LCSW-R, Unit Director of Inwood Community Services, Inc./ UNIDOS Coalition Coordinator, who has helped to coordinate efforts with other local service providers. “This will go on until every single dollar is restored. The future of our children, and our community, is not up for grabs. This is non-negotiable.”

 

En el ‘United Palace’ : Teatro sin Espectáculo

El martes en la tarde la catedral del United Palace estaba abarrotada.

¿Aplausos de pie? Si.

¿Números musicales? Si.

¿Patadas, aplausos y muchos vitorros? Si.

Pero olvidémonos de actos musicales.

La mirilla estaba sobre familias locales y sus niños que podrían perder los programas después de la escuela si el presupuesto del Alcalde Michael Bloomberg es aprobado.

Cuando el alcalde Blomberg anunció su presupuesto de $68 billones, propuso recortar programas para la niñez y para después de la escuela. Este es el quinto año consecutivo de proponer estos recortes.

Líderes locales estiman que el recorte a programas locales será de dos millones de dólares, afectando directamente centros de niños y programas después de la escuela.

Estos recortes se harían sentir después del 30 de agosto del año en curso y afectarían 47,000 niños en el norte de Manhattan.

En respuesta, los líderes comunales se han movilizado y este pasado martes se reunieron en el auditorio del United Palace.

Allí habían miles de niños, familiares y proveedores, en un programa destinado a que el Alcalde y el Concejo Municipal reincorporen estos fondos al presupuesto.

“Quisiera poder oír la caída de un alfiler al piso. Quiero que todos aquí estén en absoluto silencio” indicó Soledad Hiciano, Directora Ejecutiva de la Asociación Comunal de Dominicanos Progresistas (ACDP), cuando pidió el orden de todos los presentes. “Oyen el silencio?,” mientras su voz se hacía más recia.

“Esa es la falta de sonido que le hemos enviado al Alcalde durante los últimos 5 años y hoy sí el Alcalde nos va a oir.”

El Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez quien también estaba presente, dejó claro su punto de vista “Yo me reuso a aprobar este presupuesto hasta que el último chele que quieren recortar sea repuesto – indicó- la clase trabajadora del norte de Manhattan esta siendo muy afectada y necesitamos que el alcalde Blomberg consiga el dinero para los programas después del horario escolar.”

Soledad Hiciano, Executive Director of ACDP, stands onstage at United Palace Theater with staff and students at a protest rally.

Soledad Hiciano, Directora de la ACDP en tarima con estudiantes y empledos presentes en la demostración.

Pero fue el llamado de los pequeñines en la audiencia lo que resonó más fuertemente. Briana Rodríguez de 10 años, y con rostro de preocupación indicó “Necesito un programa después de las clases porque mi mamá necesita que alguien me cuide en lo que ella trabaja.” Añadió, “Estos programas son fabulosos porque los líderes de grupo siempre me cuidan. Necesito que el Alcalde encuentre ese dinero y mantenga estos programas.” Rodríguez no fue la única preocupada.

Lewis Rodríguez, estudiante de 8 años de edad en la escuela PS 189 explicó que no sabia qué iba a hacer su maestra si sus tareas no estaban correctas. Rodríguez (sin ninguna relación a Brenda) explicó, “Necesito que mi programa después de las clases siga abierto. Si cierran el programa no sabré como hacer mi tarea. Y es importante para mi porque siempre necesito esa ayuda.”

Los padres y los estudiantes aplaudieron de pie una y otra vez cada vez que alguien hablaba. Muchos enfatizaron que estos programas le permite a los padres dejar a sus hijos en un lugar de aprendizaje seguro.

Arelis Delao una residente de Washington Heights por más de 40 años indicó “pelearé contra estos recortes.” Su hijo Luis asiste a los programas del Children’s Aid Society. Delao enfatizó

“Este presupuesto tendrá un efecto dominó, los jóvenes estarán en las calles, los niños estarán en las calles y los padres estarán en las calles. El aAcalde esta creando caos en el norte de Manhattan.”

Muchos padres que no hablan mucho inglés están preocupados que la ayuda que sus hijos reciben ellos no podrán proporcionarla.

Beatriz Torres, cuyo hijo de 7 años Brandon asiste al programa de la PS 28 dijo “No tengo el dinero para pagar por cuidado de niños.

El programa también lo ayuda con la tarea que en muchas ocaciones yo no entiendo.”

Existe el temor que estos recortes creen una nueva ola de desempleo en la comunidad. Myrna Torres, subdirectora de la División Comunal de Children’s Aid Society está de acuerdo en que los empleados tienen que preocuparse, Torres indicó

El United Palace Theather estaba repleto de estudiantes, familias, proveedores de servios y empledos, y lideres comunales que han estado haciendo un llamado para que se restauren estos fondos.

El United Palace Theather estaba repleto de estudiantes, familias, proveedores de servios y empledos, y lideres comunales que han estado haciendo un llamado para que se restauren estos fondos.

“Muchos son empleados que viven en la comunidad y que están cursando estudios universitarios pero quedarán desempleados.” Torres le dijo al Alcalde directamente “Enséñame que de verdad te importa la educación y consigue estos fondos”.

Líderes comunales siguen organizando actividades en preparación para las vistas del Concejo Municipal sobre programas de juventud.

Angelo Ortiz del Inwood Comunity Services dijo “Esto no termina aquí, esto seguirá hasta que consigan cada dólar.

El futuro de nuestros niños y nuestra comunidad esta al garete. Esto no es negociable.”