The resolve to rise
La decisión de crecer

  • English
  • Español

The resolve to rise

Founded over two decades ago, the Model New York State Senate (Model Senate) is firmly ensconced as a CUNY institution. Students from all walks of life have taken on the role of Senator, resulting in over 1,000 individual stories of learning, debate and policy.

Administered annually by CUNY’s Edward T. Rogowsky Internship (ETR) Program with the Puerto Rican and Hispanic Task Force of the New York State Legislature and the State University of New York (SUNY), the program hosts more than 60 CUNY and SUNY students for experiential learning.

Prior to the debate in Albany, students are convened for a series of sessions in which they learn about the processes of legislative democracy and the realities associated with law-making in a diverse urban setting like New York. They also learn more general skills such as critical thinking, public speaking, and argumentation.

For many, it is their first introduction to the policy-making process in New York State.

It is often not their last.

Jessica Guerrero

Junior, John Jay College

wonder woman

Amazement. That’s what Jessica Guerrero felt upon receiving news that she’d been accepted into the Model Senate program – the first time. That was a few years ago. Now she’s back, as a seasoned veteran, working as a facilitator. “I always come back, because this is what I enjoy. I see myself improving the laws and improving my district.” The Ecuadorian student is interested in working in criminal justice, possibly at the FBI. She is busy outside the classroom too, juggling two jobs – one at a mental health center helping teens struggling with thoughts of suicide. “We’re trying to help people because of bullying. We’re doing meetings and talking to parents.” Not surprisingly, the Forensic Science major is keen on gathering and analyzing all the data and deconstructing the bill, line by line. “I have had to learn a lot of new vocabulary. I need to be prepared.” She has some ideas. “This reform needs more regulations. There should be an investigation, background checks, and a review of criminal records to make a final decision.”

 

Carmelo Quiñones Jr.

Sophomore, Bronx Community College

building balance

One mistake. That’s all it might take to undo a lifetime of effort. Carmelo Quiñones Jr. has seen the lives of some around him unravel. “You have people that are hard workers, and something can affect their life in an instant.” The Puerto Rican sophomore, who is pursuing studies in Education and English, has always had an affinity for politics. Quiñones recalls relishing debates in middle school. “We had to understand both perspectives. We always knew that from whichever side we were on, we had to find balance.” So it is with bail reform. However charged the discussion, Quiñones believes that “you should be able to have a respectful understanding of the opposition to be able to debate on the subject.” It is his duty as a Model Senator – and as a future educator – to engage fully and openly with others when there is disagreement. The work of his Model Senate mentors in constructing real dialogue has deeply impressed him. “I’ve seen this here more than I’ve seen it anywhere else.”

Alicia Rodríguez-Allie

Junior, Lehman College

espousing empathy

This political science major doesn’t believe in backing down from her convictions— but neither does she believe in tearing anyone down. “I have faced discrimination many times,” says the Puerto Rican student, “but those experiences can help me to benefit someone else that doesn’t have that voice right now.” Her decision to join Model Senate was spurred by her desire to better understand how opposing viewpoints can be forged into real compromise. “I want to refine my knowledge of politics and use it for the greater good.” The critical thinking Model Senate has provided are valuable assets. “Anyone can use the tools gained here. We would be a better society overall if everyone could apply them.” She is committed to a narrative in which more, rather than less, voices are heard. “You must consider the other perspective. This is the perfect setting to do that.”

Monsita Colón

Sophomore, Hostos Community College

willing the words

When Monsita Colón was six years old, she relied on classmates to translate the world around her. Now, she is majoring in Early Childhood Education to help others understand. “Having a child see someone like them in a classroom, they know there is a chance for them to do something better and bigger.” The wife and mother of three is proud of her Puerto Rican heritage and counts Justice Sonia Sotomayor as a role model. The Model Senate’s deliberative approach has sparked questions.  “Who is going to stand up and make a difference? It’s not all black and white. Sitting in the Senator’s seat, you actually get to see the process.” The sophomore will represent Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the first woman to lead a conference in New York State – and a former educator. “She’s been in her Senate seat for 13 years,” marvels Colón of the pioneering legislator. “She has opened the door for all women.” She is looking forward to the bail reform debate. “Criminalizing poverty has been such a big issue. It’s holding us back in so many ways.” Colón is honing her debate skills, and finding her voice.  “I am going to push through. What better platform than the New York Senate?”‎

Kayla Smith

Sophomore, Bronx Community College

a delicate dance

Thanks to Model Senate, this aspiring guidance counselor is discovering new talents – within herself. “Before this, I probably wouldn’t have even thought about tapping into my potential with these skills.” The Liberal Arts major sought out the program to learn how to best exercise positive impact on the young people she will work with in the future. “I want to influence them to make change in their neighborhoods as well.” Smith, who is also a dancer and artist, has found similarities in the different spheres she occupies. “There’s a political dance, with a lot of steps. Through this learning experience, I feel like we’re creating a piece.” She appreciates the complexities of the debate ahead. “There is more to policy than a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ Everyone should be able to learn for the sake of their communities.”

Karen Báez

Senior, City College 

participative power

Getting involved in the Model Senate program was a “no-brainer” for Karen Báez, who is pursuing Jewish Studies and History. “It’s important to contextualize the past, the present and the future,” explains the Bronx resident. Báez, who is of Dominican and Nicaraguan heritage, actively pursues social justice reforms when not tackling the texts of Hillman and Freud in class. The Model Senate program’s analytical approach has refocused her thinking. “Getting into the statistics has helped me. If you don’t have the numbers, you are going to miss out on facts.”  As she assumes the mantle of Model Senator, Báez says she is inspired by another young woman from the Bronx whose career she emulates: State Senator Alessandra Biaggi. “She is one of my major role models. I have been following her journey.” The immersion in policy-making has proven eye-opening. “Before, I thought it was all very abstract. But what we’re tackling here affects our communities and will determine the future.” And her own future is undeniably rooted in civic life. “Even if it’s being part of a community board, this is going to be a part of my life.” 

Maritza Martínez

Sophomore, Hostos Community College

real resolution

Maritza Martínez isn’t giving up. The Liberal Arts major earned her nomination to the Model Senate program by fighting hard. “I’m an advocate and like to fight for people’s rights. I want to take advantage of opportunities like this.” Learning the finer points of argumentation fascinate her. “I’ve learned that people can be quick to judge instead of getting to know more about ‘why’ or ‘how’. It is not as simple as most people believe.” The Latina sophomore credits her parents for setting an example of tenacity for her and her siblings. “They never had the chance to go to college, so I’m going to show them that I will keep going. They have been through a lot and want the best for us.” There are, admittedly, difficulties. “I have dyslexia, so just grasping all of the information is a challenge.” But she is not deterred. “I have a system of keeping my own notes. I have my strategies.”

 

La decisión de crecer

Fundado hace más de dos décadas atrás, el Modelo del Senado del Estado de Nueva York (Modelo del Senado) está firmemente instalado como una institución de CUNY. Los estudiantes de todos los ámbitos de la vida realizan el rol de senadores, lo que resulta en más de 1,000 historias individuales de aprendizaje, debate y política.

Administrado anualmente por el Programa de Pasantías Edward T. Rogowsky (ETR) de CUNY con la Fuerza de Tarea Puertorriqueña e Hispana de la Legislatura del Estado de Nueva York y la Universidad Estatal de Nueva York (SUNY), el programa alberga a más de 60 estudiantes de CUNY y SUNY una experiencia de aprendizaje.

Antes del debate en Albany, los estudiantes son convocados para una serie de sesiones en las que aprenden sobre las funciones y procesos de la democracia legislativa y las realidades asociadas con la formulación de políticas en un entorno urbano diverso como Nueva York. También aprenden habilidades más generales como el pensamiento crítico, a hablar en público y argumentación.

Para muchos, es su primera introducción al proceso de formulación de leyes en el estado de Nueva York.

A menudo, no es su último.

Jessica Guerrero

Junior, John Jay College

mujer de maravilla

Asombro. Eso es lo que Jessica Guerrero sintió al recibir noticias de que había sido aceptada en el programa Modelo del Senado, la primera vez. Eso fue hace unos años. Ahora está de vuelta, como una veterana experimentada, trabajando como facilitadora. “Siempre vuelvo, porque esto es lo que disfruto. Me veo mejorando las leyes y mejorando mi distrito”. La estudiante ecuatoriana está interesada en trabajar en justicia penal, posiblemente en el FBI. También está ocupada fuera del aula, haciendo malabarismos con dos trabajos, uno en un centro de salud mental que ayuda a los adolescentes que contemplan el suicidio. “Tratamos de ayudar a las personas debido a la intimidación. Hacemos reuniones y hablamos con los padres”. No es sorprendente que la especialista en Ciencias Forenses esté interesada en recopilar los datos y deconstruir el proyecto de ley, línea por línea. “He tenido que aprender mucho vocabulario nuevo. Necesito estar preparada”. Ella tiene también algunas ideas. “Esta reforma necesita más regulaciones. Debe haber una investigación, verificación de antecedentes y una revisión de los antecedentes penales para tomar una decisión final”.

Carmelo Quiñones Jr.

Bronx Community College

creando balance

Un error. Eso es todo lo que se necesita para deshacer un esfuerzo de por vida. Carmelo Quiñones Jr. ha visto cómo se desmoronan las vidas de algunos a su alrededor. “Hay personas que trabajan duro y algo puede afectar su vida en un instante”. El estudiante puertorriqueño de segundo año, que estudia educación e inglés, siempre ha tenido afinidad con la política. Quiñones recuerda con cariño los debates de la escuela secundaria. “Teníamos que entender ambas perspectivas. Siempre supimos que desde cualquier lado en el que estuviéramos, teníamos que encontrar el equilibrio. Así es con la reforma de la fianza”. Sin embargo, a pesar de la discusión, Quiñones cree que “debes ser capaz de tener una comprensión respetuosa de la oposición para poder debatir sobre el tema. Es tu deber como Senador Modelo, y como futuro educador, comprometerte plena y abiertamente con quienes hay desacuerdo. El trabajo de sus mentores del Senado Modelo en la construcción de un diálogo real lo ha impresionado profundamente. “He visto esto aquí más que en cualquier otro lugar”. 

Alicia Rodríguez-Allie

Lehman College

centrada en la empatía

Esta estudiante de ciencias políticas no cree en retractarse de su convicción, pero tampoco cree en derribar a nadie. “Me he enfrentado a la discriminación muchas veces”, dice la estudiante puertorriqueña, “pero esas experiencias pueden ayudarme a beneficiar a alguien más que no tiene esa voz en este momento”. Su decisión de unirse al Modelo del Senado fue estimulada por su deseo de comprender mejor cómo los puntos de vista opuestos pueden forjarse en un compromiso real. “Quiero refinar mi conocimiento de la política y usarlo para el bien común”. Las estructuras de pensamiento crítico que ha proporcionado el Modelo del Senado son activos valiosos. “Cualquiera puede usar las herramientas obtenidas aquí. Seríamos una sociedad mejor en general si todos pudieran aplicarlos”. Está comprometida con una narrativa en la que se escuchan más, en lugar de menos, voces. “Debes considerar la otra perspectiva. Este es el escenario perfecto para hacer eso”.

Monsita Colón

Hostos Community College

encontrando las palabras

Cuando Monsita Colón tenía seis años, dependía de sus compañeros de clase para traducir el mundo a su alrededor. Ahora, se especializa en Educación Infantil para ayudar a otros a entender. “Un niño, al ver a alguien como él o ella, sabe que tienen la oportunidad de hacer algo mejor y más grande”. La esposa y madre de tres hijos está orgullosa de su herencia puertorriqueña y cuenta con la jueza de la Corte Suprema Sonia Sotomayor como modelo a seguir. El enfoque deliberativo del Senado Modelo ha generado preguntas. “¿Quién va a levantarse y luchar y marcar la diferencia? No todo es blanco y negro. Sentados en la silla del senador, realmente podemos ver el proceso”. La estudiante de segundo año representará a la líder de la mayoría del Senado, Andrea Stewart-Cousins, la primera mujer en dirigir una conferencia en el estado de Nueva York, y una ex educadora. “Ella ha estado en su escaño en el Senado durante 13 años”, se maravilla Colón sobre la legisladora pionera. “Ha abierto la puerta a todas las mujeres”. Espera con interés el debate sobre la reforma de la fianza. “Criminalizar la pobreza ha sido un gran problema. Nos está frenando de muchas maneras.” Colón está perfeccionando sus habilidades de debate y encontrando su voz. “Voy a abrirme paso. ¿Qué mejor plataforma que el Senado de Nueva York?”

Karen Báez

City College 

el poder de la participación

Involucrarse en el programa del Senado Modelo fue “obvio” para Karen Báez, quien estudia Historia Judía y Estudios. “Es importante contextualizar el pasado, el presente y el futuro”, explica ella. Báez, de ascendencia dominicana y nicaragüense, ha buscado activamente reformas de justicia social cuando no aborda los textos de Hillman y Freud. El enfoque analítico del programa Modelo del Senado ha reenfocado su pensamiento. “Entrar en las estadísticas me ha ayudado. Si no tiene los números, se perderá los hechos”. Mientras asume el manto como senadora modelo, Báez dice estar inspirada en otra joven del Bronx cuya carrera emula: la senadora estatal Alessandra Biaggi. “Ella es una de mis principales modelos a seguir. He estado siguiendo su viaje”. La inmersión en la formulación de políticas junto a sus pares ha demostrado ser reveladora. “Antes, pensaba que todo era muy abstracto. Pero lo que estamos abordando aquí afecta a nuestras comunidades y determinará el futuro”. Y su propio futuro está indudablemente arraigado en la educación cívica. “Incluso si es ser parte de una junta comunitaria, será parte de mi vida”. 

Kayla Smith

Bronx Community College

un baile delicado

Gracias al Modelo del Senado, esta aspirante a consejera está descubriendo nuevos talentos, en ella. “Antes de esto, probablemente ni siquiera habría pensado en aprovechar mi potencial con estas habilidades”. La estudiante de Artes Liberales buscó el programa para aprender formas efectivas de ejercer un impacto positivo en los jóvenes con los que trabajará en el futuro. “Quiero influir en ellos para que también hagan cambios en sus vecindarios”. Smith, quien también es bailarina y artista, ha encontrado similitudes en las diferentes esferas que ocupa. “Hay un baile político, con muchos pasos. A través de esta experiencia de aprendizaje, siento que estamos creando una pieza”. Ella aprecia las complejidades del debate que se avecina. “Hay más en la política que un simple “sí” o “no”. Todos deberían poder aprender por el bien de sus comunidades”.

Maritza Martínez

Estudiante de segundo año, Hostos Community College

resolución real

Maritza Martínez no se da por vencida. La estudiante de Artes Liberales obtuvo su nominación al programa Modelo del Senado tranajando duro. “Soy una defensora y me gusta luchar por los derechos de las personas. Quiero aprovechar oportunidades como esta”. Aprender los puntos más finos de la argumentación la fascina. “Aprendí que las personas pueden ser rápidas para juzgar en lugar de conocer más el “por qué” o el “cómo”. No es tan simple como la mayoría de la gente cree”. La estudiante latina de segundo año reconoce a sus padres por dar un ejemplo de tenacidad para ella y sus hermanos. “Nunca tuvieron la oportunidad de ir a la universidad, así que les mostraré que seguiré. Han pasado por mucho y quieren lo mejor para nosotros”. Hay dificultades, ciertamente. “Tengo dislexia, por lo que simplemente aprovechar toda la información es un desafío”. Pero eso no la desalienta. “Tengo un sistema para guardar mis propias notas. Tengo mis estrategias”.