LocalNewsPolitics/Government

The power of the Latino vote
El poder del voto latino

The power of the Latino vote

Story and photos by Jenna Dagenhart


Democratic mayoral candidate attended an immigration rally.
Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio attended an immigration rally.

More than two million Hispanics live in New York City, accounting for nearly 30 percent of the city’s population.

Yet while 900,000 Latinos were registered to vote in the last mayoral election, they cast only 250,000 of the 1.2 million total ballots.

Experts believe this electoral passivism is about to change.

“Campaigns are reaching to close those gaps. I would expect, hope for, half a million in 2013,” said Julissa Gutiérrez, a Director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund.  “It’s a very exciting time right now for the Latino community. We’re all hoping for change.”

The intense potential of the Latino voting pool has been igniting new energy among mayoral candidates and non-partisan groups seeking to get out the vote.  Following the recent election of City Council’s first-ever Mexican-American, Carlos Menchaca, many New Yorkers are hoping Latino mobilization will translate to the polls on Tues., Nov. 5th.

“The mayor should have a connection to the people,” said Louis Cajigas, 83.
“The mayor should have a connection to the people,” said Louis Cajigas, 83.

“This is the great X-factor in this election,” said Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio, who broke ground by launching one of his campaign videos entirely in Spanish.

Republican Joe Lhota and independent mayoral candidates Adolfo Carrión and Erick Salgado have also been vying for the Hispanic vote.  “Across party lines, there’s been a more concentrated effort with the changing tone of the election,” said Gutierrez.

Republican Party spokesperson Ore Jacinto agreed.

“The Republican Party in New York State has taken meaningful steps to engage New York’s Hispanic population,” said Jacinto. “In the last year and half, we have established over 16 county-level Hispanic Republican coalitions throughout New York State.”

The 2013 crop of mayoral candidates has yelled “mis hermanos y hermanas” to dancers wearing indigenous feathered costumes at immigration reform rallies, attended debate panels sponsored by the bilingual language magazine LatinTrends, marched 30 blocks up Fifth Avenue during the Hispanic Day parade, and spoken Spanish more than ever in YouTube campaign videos and public appearances.

Mayoral candidate Erick Salgado has lobbied for Latino votes.
Mayoral candidate Erick Salgado has lobbied for Latino votes.

“The mayor should have a connection to the people,” said Louis Cajigas, 83, who lives in Harlem and marched in the Hispanic Day parade pushing a wagon decorated with roosters, Puerto Rican flags to celebrate his heritage, a picture of himself with Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and an endorsement for de Blasio written in Spanish.

“In this election, I’ll support de Blasio,” said Cajigas. “He seems to know the people the best.”

Another woman who attended the Hispanic Parade while visiting from São Paulo had mixed feelings about the candidates’ outreach efforts that day.

“I love the beautiful dancing, but it’s no Carnival. Some people look like they don’t even want to be here,” said Thati Ferrari, 33, speaking in Portuguese.

“Like them,” she pointed when the Lhota campaign walked by wearing white t-shirts and waving signs at half-mast.

Michael Jones-Correa, a Cornell government professor, said that a large percentage of Hispanics will likely vote Democrat because of the party’s stance on “education, immigration issues, jobs, the economy.”  Jones-Correa is the author of Between Two Nations, a qualitative study of how new immigrants assimilate into American political life.

The campaign of Joe Lhota, the Republican candidate for mayor, made its presence known at the Hispanic Day parade.
The campaign of Joe Lhota, the Republican candidate for mayor, made its presence known at the Hispanic Day parade.

“Two sections of the demographic are going to change election outcomes by expanding the Latino voting pool: older immigrants being naturalized and young Latinos who are turning 18 and beginning to register.  People often underestimate this second group, who will have a large impact on local and national politics,” said Jones-Correa, referencing how Hispanics have already significantly influenced California politics.

New York will hopefully see the same soon, said Gutiérrez of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund. “Everyday folks are becoming naturalized. A lot of non-profits go to the courthouses and immediately register people to vote. Usually we get about 200 a day.”

“It’s a very exciting time right now for the Latino community,” says Julissa Gutierrez, of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund
“It’s a very exciting time right now for the Latino community,” says Julissa Gutierrez, of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund

In addition to the mayoral candidates outreach efforts, the National Institute for Latino Policy, La Fuente, the New York City League of Women Voters and many other non-partisan groups have played an integral part in the push for participation by getting out the vote and making political resources accessible in both English and Spanish.

“We want to make sure we get every eligible Hispanic voter in New York City registered and informed,” said Ashton Stewart, 42, executive director of the NYC League of Women Voters.

“I think generally speaking there will be a greater turnout on Nov. 5th because there is more information out there like vote411.org and because get out the vote resources are growing in publicity and popularity,” said Stewart.

Vote411.org is an interactive guide adopted by the New York City League of Women Voters in 2010 to help voters understand ballot issues, candidates’ platforms and simply how to vote. The organization also launched its online “First Vote” bilingual brochure after the last political debate between de Blasio and Lhota.

Many of these initiatives and resources, which were not available just four years ago during the 2009 race, offer Spanish language options to maximize voter participation and understanding.

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Stewart with confidence and pride in his voice. “People are receptive.”

Election Day is Tues., Nov. 5th.
Polls are open
6 a.m. to 9 p.m.
For more information on polling places, please visit The Board of Elections at www.vote.nyc.ny.us/html/home/locator_updates.shtml or at
212.487.5400.

 

El poder del voto latino

Historia y fotos por Jenna Dagenhart


Democratic mayoral candidate attended an immigration rally.
El candidato a alcalde demócrata asistió a un mitin de inmigración.

Más de dos millones de hispanos viven en la ciudad de Nueva York, lo que representa casi el 30 por ciento de la población de la ciudad.

Sin embargo, aunque se registraron 900 mil latinos para votar en la última elección para alcalde, participaron sólo 250,000 de los 1.2 millones de votantes totales.

Los expertos creen que esta pasividad electoral está a punto de cambiar.

“Las campañas tartan de cerrar esas brechas. Yo esperaría que, tengo la esperanza, de que vote medio millón de personas en 2013”, dijo Julissa Gutiérrez, directora de la Asociación Nacional de Funcionarios Latinos Electos y Designados al Fondo Educativo. “Es un momento muy emocionante ahora mismo para la comunidad latina. Todos estamos esperando un cambio”.

El intenso potencial de dicho grupo de votantes latinos ha encendido una nueva energía entre los candidatos a la alcaldía y grupos no partidistas que intentan salir a votar. A raíz de la reciente elección al Consejo de la ciudad del primer mexicano-americano, Carlos Menchaca, muchos neoyorquinos esperan que las movilizaciones latinas se traduzcan en votos el martes 5 de noviembre “Este es el gran factor X en esta elección”, dijo el candidato a alcalde demócrata Bill de Blasio, quien puso la primera piedra lanzando uno de sus vídeos de campaña totalmente en español.

“The mayor should have a connection to the people,” said Louis Cajigas, 83.
“El alcalde debe tener una conexión con la gente”, dijo Luis Cajigas, de 83 años de edad.

El republicano Joe Lhota y los candidatos independientes a la alcaldía Adolfo Carrión y Erick Salgado también han estado compitiendo por el voto hispano. “A través de las líneas del partido, ha habido un esfuerzo más concentrado para cambiar el tono de la elección”, dijo Gutiérrez.

El portavoz del Partido Republicano, Ore Jacinto, estuvo de acuerdo.

“El Partido Republicano en el estado de Nueva York ha tomado medidas significativas para involucrar a la población hispana de Nueva York”, dijo Jacinto. “En el último año y medio, se han establecido más de 16 coaliciones entre republicanos e hispanos a nivel de condado en todo el estado de Nueva York”.

La cosecha de 2013 de los candidatos a la alcaldía ha gritado “mis hermanos y hermanas” a bailarines vestidos con trajes indígenas de plumas en los mítines para la reforma migratoria, también asistió a paneles de discusión patrocinados por la revista bilingüe LatinTrends, marchó 30 cuadras hasta la Quinta Avenida durante el desfile del día de la Hispanidad y habló español más que nunca en videos de campaña de YouTube y apariciones públicas.

Mayoral candidate Erick Salgado has lobbied for Latino votes.
El candidato a Alcalde Erick Salgado ha buscado el voto latino.

“El alcalde debe tener una conexión con la gente”, dijo Luis Cajigas, de 83 años, que vive en Harlem y marchó en el desfile del Día de la Hispanidad empujando un carro decorado con gallos y banderas de Puerto Rico para celebrar su herencia, una imagen de sí mismo con el alcalde Michael Bloomberg, y el respaldo para de Blasio escrito en español.

“En esta elección, voy a apoyar de Blasio”, dijo Cajigas. “Él parece saber qué es lo mejor para la gente”.

Otra mujer que asistió a al desfile de la Hispanidad durante su visita desde São Paulo tenía sentimientos encontrados acerca de los esfuerzos de difusión de los candidatos ese día.

“Me encanta el baile hermoso, pero no es un carnaval. Algunas personas parece que ni siquiera quieren estar aquí”, dijo Thati Ferrari, de 33 años, hablando en portugués.

“Al igual que ellos”, señaló, diciendo que cuando la campaña de Lhota caminaba llevaba camisetas blancas y agitaba signos a media asta.

The campaign of Joe Lhota, the Republican candidate for mayor, made its presence known at the Hispanic Day parade.
La campaña de Joe Lhota, candidato republicano a la alcaldía, hizo notar su presencia en el desfile del día de la Hispanidad.

Michael Jones-Correa, profesor de gobierno de Cornell, dijo que un gran porcentaje de hispanos  probablemente votará por los demócratas debido a la postura del partido en “la educación, los temas de inmigración, el empleo y la economía”. Jones-Correa es autor de Between Two Nations, un estudio cualitativo de cómo los nuevos inmigrantes asimilan la vida política estadounidense.

“Dos secciones de la demografía van a cambiar los resultados electorales al ampliarse el grupo de votantes latinos: los inmigrantes mayores, por ser naturalizados, y los latinos que están cumpliendo 18 y empezando a registrarse. La gente suele subestimar al segundo grupo, el cual tendrá un gran impacto en la política local y nacional”, dijo Jones-Correa, haciendo referencia a cómo los hispanos ya han influenciado de manera significativa la política de California.

Nueva York espera ver lo mismo en breve, dijo Gutiérrez de la Asociación Nacional de Funcionarios Latinos Electos y Designados al Fondo Educativo. “Todos los días la gente se está naturalizando. Una gran cantidad de organizaciones no lucrativas va a los juzgados y registra inmediatamente a la gente para votar.

“It’s a very exciting time right now for the Latino community,” says Julissa Gutierrez, of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund
“Es un momento muy emocionante ahora para la comunidad latina”, dijo Julissa Gutiérrez, de la Asociación Nacional de Funcionarios Latinos Electos y Designados al Fondo Educativo.

Por lo general, tenemos alrededor de 200 al día”.

Además de los esfuerzos de alcance de los candidatos a la alcaldía, el Instituto Nacional de Política Latina, La Fuente, la Liga de Mujeres Votantes de la ciudad de Nueva York y muchos otros grupos no partidistas, han jugado un papel fundamental en el empuje para la participación, haciendo que la gente salga a votar y volviendo accesibles los recursos políticos, tanto en inglés como en español.

“Queremos asegurarnos de que tenemos a todos los votantes hispanos elegibles en Nueva York registrados e informados”, dijo Ashton Stewart, de 42 años, director ejecutivo de la Liga de Mujeres Votantes de Nueva York.

“Creo que en términos generales habrá una mayor participación el 5 de noviembre porque hay más información disponible, como vote411.org y porque los recursos para salir a votar están aumentando en publicidad y popularidad “, dijo Stewart.

Vote411.org es una guía interactiva adoptada por la Liga de de Mujeres Votantes de la ciudad de Nueva York en 2010 para ayudar a los votantes a entender las cuestiones electorales, las plataformas de los candidatos y simplemente cómo votar. La organización también lanzó su folleto bilingüe en línea “First Vote “después del último debate político entre de Blasio y Lhota.

Muchas de estas iniciativas y recursos, que no estaban disponibles hace apenas cuatro años, durante la competencia de 2009, ofrecen opciones en idioma español para maximizar la participación y la comprensión de los votantes.

“Hemos visto un gran crecimiento”, dijo Stewart con confianza y orgullo en su voz. “La gente está receptiva”.

El día de la elección es el 5 de noviembre.
Las casillas para votar estarán abiertas de 6 a.m. a 9 p.m.
Para obtener más información sobre los lugares de votación, por favor visite la Junta de Elecciones en vote.nyc.ny.us/html/home/locator_updates.shtml o en el 212.487.5400.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker