Taking root, seed by seed

Tomando la raíz, semilla por semilla

  • English
  • Español

Taking root, seed by seed

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“I’ve been learning so much,” said artist Juanli Carrión, on the art installation Outer Seed Shadow (OSS #01).

“I’ve been learning so much,” said artist Juanli Carrión, on the art installation Outer Seed Shadow (OSS #01).

The most readily identifiable symbol of the island of Manhattan is probably the one most commuters glance at daily: the subway map.

But coming this spring, New Yorkers will have an opportunity to see a different version, what participants are calling “the most inclusive community garden in New York City”.

The project, Outer Seed Shadow (known also as OSS #01), is a public art installation that will debut in May 2014.

Details of the project were shared at a reception at the Horticultural Society of New York this past Thurs., Oct. 24th.

Together with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, Spanish artist Juanli Carrión has been conducting interviews with immigrants living across Manhattan, allowing them to tell their stories of arrival in their own words as well as symbolically in the form of plants they’ve selected to best represent themselves and their countries of origin.

With the great variety of plants derived from dozens of interviews, the artist is creating a 2,000 sq. ft. interactive community garden in the shape of Manhattan.

Carrión, himself an immigrant of Murcia, Spain, has interviewed 40 immigrants so far; each picked a plant from their home country to place on a temporary recreation of the island of Manhattan.

The 2,000 sq-ft. project has been labeled “the most inclusive community garden in New York City”.

The 2,000 sq-ft. project has been labeled “the most inclusive community garden in New York City”.

This rendition more closely resembles Manahatta, the name applied to the verdant, hilly island by the Lenni Lenape who once lived here.

Outer Seed Shadow (known also as OSS #01) is named for plant outliers, the seeds that pioneer beyond their cluster of species to germinate and grow on their own.

OSS #01 will occupy a space at Canal Street’s Juan Duarte Plaza, named for one of the democratic founders of the Dominican Republic, for eight months.

ORE Design and Technology provided architectural and design support for the project.

With ORE’s input, the periphery of the island will feature a seating area as well as an ADA accessible pathway down its center, which will serve as OSS #01’s answer to Broadway. The island is expected to be approximately 24 inches deep.

Duarte Plaza, which falls under the domain of the Parks Department, is scheduled for renovation next year. The OSS #01 project will be introduced to the plaza next spring and will take up an 8-month residency before renovation starts.

Thomas Kosbau, founder of ORE, wants to make it portable.

“It’s such a great project,” he said. “It’s supposed to be temporary, but I have a feeling that it will have such a popular appeal that it will be replicated, or put somewhere else.”

“The city needs this,” said participant Chris Yong.

“The city needs this,” said participant Chris Yong.

George Pisegna, Director of Horticulture and Public Programs at the Horticultural Society of New York, explained that the organization would also lend a hand with the planting and maintenance of the garden.

Pisegna is the son of immigrants, and the project resonates with him on a number of levels.

As a horiculturalist, he experiences first-hand the trouble some plants and flowers have taking root – not unlike the challenges faced by immigrants in a new land.

“I know how troublesome it is (for immigrants) to find a place,” he noted. “The plants will also be a challenge.”

Priyanka Dasgupta too knows that settling in can be tricky.

“I’ve had my own battles growing plants from my childhood,” she said.

Dasgupta, a multi-media artist and teaching adjunct professor, has tried to grow chili, jasmine and bougainvillea, all plants that grow in her native India, on the deck of her apartment in Harlem.

She has had mixed success.

“There are interesting parallels in trying to hold onto physical habits and routines, and trying to grow something in a climate it doesn’t belong,” she observed.

When Dasgupta was interviewed by Carrión, she requested that he grow Indian Jasmine.

OSS #01 will be placed at Juan Duarte Plaza.

OSS #01 will be placed at Juan Duarte Plaza.

“One of my favorite things about summer in India is that you walk onto the streets and you’re surrounded by the smell of jasmine. It overpowers the smell of the traffic.”

Dasgupta has fared better in New York than her favorite plant.

“I have always felt welcomed in this city, unlike my jasmine,” she laughed.

On Carrión’s replica of Manhattan, Dasgupta’s Indian Jasmine plant will grow next to a tangerine tree and a palm tree, suggested by immigrants from Taiwan and the Dominican Republic respectively.

Pisegna and Carrión will be placing the plants based on where the immigrants live. Plants named by immigrants living in Northern Manhattan will find themselves occupying a space at the top of the model island of Manhattan, and plants suggested by immigrants in the southern tier of Manhattan will be placed at the bottom of the model, potentially resulting in neighboring plants that naturally wouldn’t share geographic vicinity.

“We’ll see what happens. Some plants will survive and persevere, and some will thrive,” said Pisegna.

And some will wither, he admitted.

While Carrión has interviewed 40 people from 30 different countries, he is looking for additional subjects and hopes to find representatives from every country in the world.

“It’s such a great project,” said Thomas Kosbau of ORE Design and Technology (first on left). He was joined, from left to right, by Amie Uhrynowski, Art Commission Liaison of NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, and George Pisegna of the Horticultural Society of New York, and Juanli Carrión.

“It’s such a great project,” said Thomas Kosbau of ORE Design and Technology (first on left). He was joined, from left to right, by Amie Uhrynowski, Art Commission Liaison of NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, and George Pisegna of the Horticultural Society of New York, and Juanli Carrión.

He found one recruit on Thursday in Chris Yong, a graphic designer who lives in Harlem.

Yong hails from Lima, Peru.

He recalls being surrounded by plants when he was growing up.

“My mother was crazy about plants. It was a big thing in my house.”

Yong said he doesn’t have a plant in mind yet to contribute to the project, but Carrión gave him a month to do some research. With the project, Yong has inherited a newfound fervor for plants.

“I know I need them, but I don’t know anything about them. I can talk a lot about my immigrant experience, but I can’t talk a lot about plants.”

Yong lauded the project.

“The city needs this. Everything is grey and everyone is busy, but plants are something you have to take care of; they’re essential,” he said. “People have to realize that.”

He said the garden is about dreams as much as it is about immigrants.

“New York is constructed by immigrants. Everyone has been dreams, but not everyone makes it,” he said.

Still, it is Carrión’s hope that all the plants will survive with the help of the community.

“It’s my hope that they won’t die. That’s my challenge to the people,” he said. “It’s a community garden. Every person in the city and beyond is welcome to take care of the garden.”

The installation will boast plants from throughout the world.

The installation will boast plants from throughout the world.

Initially it will be just Carrión and Pisegna who will be tending the plants, but Carrión hopes to initiate horticulture workshops and volunteer hours.

Carrión, an avid green thumb, has already learned how to take care of some of the many various species and planted them in a to-scale model of Manhattan that was on display at the launch.

To date, the most exotic plant Carrión has been introduced to is the buchy, a species of chive that is native to South Korea. He now has the plant sitting in his Brooklyn apartment after it was given to him by a South Korean woman he interviewed.

“I’ve been learning so much,” he said.

If he were to choose a personal plant for the project, Carrión would opt for the encina, a type of oak tree that dots the landscape of Murcia. Many of the towering and expansive trees are centuries old. Carrión is certain that some even pre-date the Roman invasion of Spain in 19 B.C., since they require 50 years just to grow ten meters. These remains of ancient forests now grow among olive groves.

“It’s the kind of tree you go to nap under,” said Carrión.

If you are interested in participating in Outer Seed Shadow, contact Juanli Carrión at project@outerseedshadow.org.

To donate funds for the ADA compliant pathway, please visit http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1356849625/outer-seed-shadow-01.

Tomando la raíz, semilla por semilla

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“He estado aprendiendo tanto”, dijo el artista Juanli Carrión, de la instalación de arte ‘Outer Seed Shadow’ (OSS#1).

“He estado aprendiendo tanto”, dijo el artista Juanli Carrión, de la instalación de arte ‘Outer Seed Shadow’ (OSS#1).

El símbolo más fácilmente identificable de la isla de Manhattan es probablemente el que la mayoría de los viajeros ven diariamente: el mapa del tren.

Pero para esta primavera, los neoyorquinos tendrán la oportunidad de ver una versión diferente, que los participantes están llamando “el jardín comunal más inclusivo en la ciudad de Nueva York”.

El proyecto, ‘Outer Seed Shadow’ (también conocido como OSS#01), es una instalación de arte pública que debutará en mayo del 2014.

Detalles del proyecto fueron compartidos en una recepción de la Sociedad de Horticultura de Nueva York este pasado jueves, 24 de octubre.

Junto al Departamento de Parques y Recreos de la ciudad de Nueva York, el artista español Juanli Carrión ha llevado a cabo entrevistas con inmigrantes que viven en Manhattan, permitiéndoles contarle sus historias de su llegada en sus propias palabras así como simbólicamente en la forma de plantas que han seleccionado para mejor representarlos a ellos y a sus países de origen.

Con la gran variedad de plantas derivadas de docenas de entrevistas, el artista está creando un jardín comunal interactivo de 2,000 pies cuadrados con la forma de Manhattan.

Carrión, inmigrante de Murcia, España, hasta ahora ha entrevistado a 40 inmigrantes; cada uno escogió una planta de su país para colocarla en una recreación temporal de la isla de Manhattan.

El proyecto de 2,000 pies cuadrados ha sido etiquetado como “el jardín comunal más inclusivo en la ciudad de Nueva York”.

El proyecto de 2,000 pies cuadrados ha sido etiquetado como “el jardín comunal más inclusivo en la ciudad de Nueva York”.

Esta interpretación se asemeja más a Manhattan, el nombre aplicado a la isla verde por Lenni Lenape quien una vez vivió aquí.

‘Outer Seed Shadow’ (también conocido como OSS#1) es el nombre de los valores externos, las semillas que fueron pioneras más allá de su origen de especies para germinar y crecer por su propia cuenta.

OSS#1 ocupará un espacio en la Calle Canal en Juan Duarte Plaza, nombrado por uno de los fundadores demócratas de la República Dominicana, por ocho meses.

‘ORE Design and Technology’ suministró apoyo arquitectónico y diseño para el proyecto. Con la ayuda de ORE, la periferia de la isla presentará un área de asientos como también un camino accesible ADA en su centro, el cual servirá como respuesta de OSS#1 a Broadway. Se espera que la isla tenga aproximadamente 24 pulgadas de profundidad.

La Plaza Duarte, la cual cae bajo el dominio del Departamento de Parques, está programado para renovación el próximo año. El proyecto OSS#1 será introducido a la plaza la próxima primavera y estará por 8 meses antes de que la renovación comience.

Thomas Kosbau, fundador de ORE, quiere que sea portátil.

“Es un gran proyecto”, dijo. “Se supone que es temporal, pero tengo la sensación de que va a ser tan popular que se repetirá o será colocado en otro lugar”.

“La ciudad necesita esto”, dijo el participante Chris Yong.

“La ciudad necesita esto”, dijo el participante Chris Yong.

George Pisegna, Director de Horticultura y Programas Públicos en la Sociedad de Horticultura de Nueva York, explicó que la organización también ayudará con la siembra y el mantenimiento del jardín.

Pisegna es el hijo de inmigrantes, y el proyecto le resuena en diferentes niveles. Como horticulturista, el experimenta de primera mano el trabajo que algunas plantas y flores tienen para echar raíces – no muy diferente a los retos que enfrentan los inmigrantes en una nueva tierra.

“Yo se cuan problemático es para los inmigrantes encontrar un lugar”, señaló. “Las plantas también serán un reto”.

Priyanka Dasgupta también sabe que el establecerse puede ser complicado.

“Yo también tuve mis propias batallas sembrando plantas de mi niñez”, dijo ella.

Dasgupta, artista y profesora, ha tratado de sembrar chili, jazmín y ‘bougainvillea’, todas plantas que crecen en su India natal, en la terraza de su apartamento en Harlem.

Ha tenido medios éxitos.

“Hay paralelos interesantes en tratar de aferrarse a hábitos físicos y rutinas, y tratar de crecer algo en un clima al que no pertenece”, observó.

Cuando Dasgupta fue entrevista por Carrión, ella pidió que sembraran jazmín de la India. “Una de mis cosas favoritas acerca del verano en India es que caminas por las calles y estas rodeado por el olor a jazmín. Sobrepasa el olor del tráfico”.

OSS #01 será colocado en la Plaza Juan Duarte.

OSS #01 será colocado en la Plaza Juan Duarte.

A Dasgupta le ha ido mejor en Nueva York que a su planta favorita.

“Siempre me he sentido acogida en esta ciudad, a diferencia de mi jazmín”, sonrió.

En la réplica de Manhattan de Carrión, el jazmín indio de Dasgupta crecerá cerca de un árbol de mandarina y una palma, sugerido por inmigrantes de Taiwan y la República Dominicana respectivamente.

Pisegna y Carrión estarán colocando las plantas basado en donde viven los inmigrantes. Las plantas nombradas por los inmigrantes que viven en el Norte de Manhattan se encontraran a si mismas ocupado un lugar en el tope de la isla modelo de Manhattan, y las plantas sugeridas por los inmigrantes en la parte sur de Manhattan serán colocadas en la parte inferior del modelo, resultando potencialmente en plantas vecinas que naturalmente no compartirían zona geográfica.

“Veremos que pasa. Algunas plantas sobrevivirán y perseverarán, y algunas van a prosperar”, dijo Pisegna.

Y algunas se marchitarán, admitió.

Mientras que Carrión ha entrevistado a 40 personas de 30 países diferentes, está buscando diferentes asuntos y espera encontrar representantes de cada país en el mundo. Encontró un recluta el jueves en Chris Yong, diseñador gráfico que vive en Harlem. Yong viene de Lima, Perú.

“Es un gran proyecto”, dijo Thomas Kosbau de ORE Design and Technology (primero a la izquierda). Se le unió, de izquierda a derecha, Amie Uhrynowski del Departamento de Parques, George Pisegna de la Sociedad de Horticultores de Nueva York y Juanli Carrión.

“Es un gran proyecto”, dijo Thomas Kosbau de ORE Design and Technology (primero a la izquierda). Se le unió, de izquierda a derecha, Amie Uhrynowski del Departamento de Parques, George Pisegna de la Sociedad de Horticultores de Nueva York y Juanli Carrión.

El recuerda estar rodeado de plantas cuando crecía.

“A mi madre le encantaban las plantas. Era algo en mi casa”.

Yong dijo que todavía no tiene una planta en mente para contribuir al proyecto pero Carrión le dio un mes para hacer una investigación. Con el proyecto, Yong ha adquirido un nuevo fervor por las plantas.

“Se que las necesito, pero no se nada acerca de ellas. Puedo hablar mucho de mi experiencia como inmigrante, pero no puedo hablar acerca de plantas”.

Yong elogió el proyecto.

“La ciudad necesita esto. Todo es gris y todo el mundo está ocupado, pero las plantas son algo que tienes que cuidar; son esenciales”, dijo el. “La gente se tiene que dar cuenta de ello”.

Dijo que el jardín es acerca de sueños tanto como es acerca de los inmigrantes.

“Nueva York está construido por inmigrantes. Todo el mundo ha tenido sueños pero no todo el mundo lo logra”, dijo.

Aunque es la esperanza de Carrión de que todas las plantas sobrevivan con la ayuda de la comunidad. “Es mi deseo de que no mueran. Ese es mi reto a las personas”, dijo el. “Es un jardín comunal. Cada persona en la ciudad y más allá es bienvenida a cuidar del jardín”.

La instalación tendrá plantas de todo el mundo.

La instalación tendrá plantas de todo el mundo.

Inicialmente será solo Carrión y Pisegna quienes atenderían las plantas, pero Carrión espera iniciar unos talleres de horticultura y horas voluntarias.

Carrión, un ávido de lo verde, ya ha aprendido algo de cómo cuidar algunas de las varias especies y sembrarlas en un modelo en escala de Manhattan que estaba en exhibición en el lanzamiento.

Hoy, la planta más exótica que Carrión ha introducido a su modelo, es una especie de cebolla que es nativa del Sur de Corea. Ahora tiene la planta sentada en su apartamento en Brooklyn luego de que una mujer coreana que entrevistó se la diera.

“He estado aprendiendo tanto”, dijo.

Si tuviéramos que elegir una planta personal para el proyecto, Carrión optaría por la encina, un tipo de árbol de roble que salpica el paisaje de Murcia. Muchos de los altos y extensos árboles tienen siglos. Carrión está seguro que algunos vienen de hasta antes de la invasión romana de España en el 19 BF (Antes de Cristo), ya que estos requieren 50 años solo para crecer diez metros. Estos restos de antiguos bosques ahora crecen entre los olivos.

“Es el tipo de árbol que usted va para tomar una siesta”, dijo Carrión.

Si está interesado en participar en ‘Outer Seed Shadow’, comuníquese con Juanli Carrión a project@outerseedshadow.org.

Para donar fondos para el camino ADA, favor de visitar: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1356849625/outer-seed-shadow-01.