Sweets, sewing and success
Dulces, costura y éxito

  • English
  • Español

Sweets, sewing and success

Q and A with track and field athlete Ajeé Wilson

“There are many ways to get where you want to go,” says American track and field star Ajeé Wilson.

“Success in track drives me, but it doesn’t define me.”

Track and field superstar Ajeé Wilson is no stranger to the limelight – or hard work.

As the current outdoor and indoor American record holder in the 800 meter, and a current spokesperson for Adidas’ “Run for the Oceans” campaign, Wilson has long excelled in meeting and surpassing her goals.

Now the aspiring Olympian will be on hand to offer guidance and counsel to younger athletes when she serves as “Coach for the Day” on November 16 at the Armory Indoor Track & Field Camp, which focuses on high school track and field athletes.

Wilson, who was also named 2011 Youth Athlete of the Year by USA Track & Field’s Youth Committee, will join fellow stars premier sprinter and hurdler Sydney McLaughlin and American indoor record holder in pole vault and Olympic silver medalist Lawrence Johnson, among others, to offer unique instruction to the student-athletes at The Armory New Balance Track & Field Center.

The space is a familiar one for Wilson, as it was there during the Millrose Games on Feb. 9, 2019 that she set that indoor 800 meter American record – with an explosive time of 1:58:60.

“I’m super excited to spend the day sharing my experiences and hearing about theirs,” says Wilson about the Camp. She also recently took time for a Q and A.

QUESTION: What does it mean for you to come back to The Armory, where you’ve been so successful, and give advice to high school runners?

WILSON: It’s so special to come back to The Armory to give advice to high school students. For one, it doesn’t feel this long since I was in the same position. I remember college students coming back and talking to us in high school, and how it affected me. So, I’m excited to be in the similar position and hopefully have a similar impact.

 

The aspiring Olympian will serve as “Coach for the Day.”

QUESTION: At what age did you know you could excel in track & field en route to a professional career, and how did you come to this conclusion?

WILSON: I started believing I could really excel in track the summer after my sophomore year, so at 16. I’d made my first national team and placed 5th at the World Junior Championships in Moncton, Canada that year. Up until this point, track was still very much a hobby – something I loved to do because it was fun, and I loved competing. At Worlds, I saw how different my peers were in comparison. I didn’t think I trained as hard, I wasn’t as disciplined, and I wasn’t as invested in what I was doing. I walked away thinking about how much better I’d be if I applied myself in the same ways they did. I wanted to come back in two years and win.

 

The camp is held at The Armory New Balance Track & Field Center.

QUESTION: During the upcoming camp, what will be the most important thing you can tell high school kids?

WILSON: I think the most important take away will be there’s no cookie cutter path to success, and more importantly, it’s okay to fail along the way. For me, I have my parents to thank for the outlook I have on success in track, and in any aspect of my life really. Success in track drives me, but it doesn’t define me. Being “good at running” isn’t my biggest strength/attribute. The greatest thing I [have to give] isn’t my talent on the track. Track is simply the medium through which I can show those things. Remembering that doesn’t make me any less committed to what I’m doing, but it helps me balance the stresses, ups, and downs that come with running.

 

QUESTION: When you were in high school, how much focus did you have on training, nutrition, maintaining a high academic standard and enjoying life as a teenager?

WILSON: When I was in high school, my academics were my top priority. When needed, I’d miss practices for studying for big tests or skip other extracurriculars for important school projects. As for track and training, I got more focused as I got older, but it was a slow process. My parents helped largely with helping that shift. I ate well when I was home but wasn’t as good as I am now at curbing my love of candy and other sweet treats. With training, I laugh looking back on how my mom would park across the street to make sure I was doing what I was supposed to at practices. Enjoying life without the tag of runner was just as important to me then as it is now. Balance is so important with anything you do in life, so I somehow always found time to hang out with friends, was in a handful of clubs, and work at some points.

 

Wilson (center) with fellow runners Noah Lyles and Drew Hunter at the Boston Boost Games in April.

QUESTION: Who was the person who gave you the best advice when you were in high school and what was that advice? And, was there a track & field athlete who you looked up to that gave you extra motivation?

WILSON: Hands down, I’d say my mom gave me the best advice in high school, although I can’t really pinpoint exact words or anecdotes that stuck with me. Instead, I just remember how she made me feel. She taught me that I could get what I wanted in life by figuring out how, and then being committed to getting to that goal. Cut and dry – no excuses. The saying “Where there’s a will, there’s a way” I think captures the sentiment best. To this day, whenever I’m faced with a tough decision, conflict, or have a goal I want to attain I think, “What’s the solution?” I figure out the best way to get the outcome that I want, and then I commit. When you’re committed to the end goal, finding ways to overcome speed bumps or obstacles that come along the way is just a tad bit easier. There are many ways to get where you want to go. You just need to figure it out.

In high school, there were a handful of athletes I looked up to who inspired me. Many of whom were also in high school. I’d say I most looked up to Jillian Smith, who was an 800/miler from Southern regional though. She was the queen of the track when I first started high school, and I’d raced her a few times and admired how effortless it seemed to be for her. By my senior year, I wanted to be just as dominant in the state as she was.

 

Wilson is the current outdoor and indoor American record holder in the 800 meter.

QUESTION: What are your goals for 2020?

WILSON: I’m still working on my list of goals for 2020! Off season is coming to an end, so I’ve been thinking more and more about what I want to accomplish this year. On the track, my main goal is to be happy, healthy, and fast for 2020! Hopefully by the end of the season, that will involve being an Olympic medalist (preferably gold). Off the track, I want to pick up a new hobby – I’m leaning towards learning how to sew!

To register and learn more about The Armory Indoor Track, please visit armorycamp.org.

Dulces, costura y éxito

Preguntas y respuestas con la atleta Ajeé Wilson

ÍCONO PEQUEÑO DD

“Hay muchas maneras de llegar a donde quieres ir”, dice la estrella estadounidense de atletismo Ajeé Wilson.

“El éxito en la pista me impulsa, pero no me define”.

La superestrella del atletismo Ajeé Wilson no es ajena al centro de atención, ni al trabajo duro.

Como actual poseedora del récord estadounidense en exteriores e interiores en los 800 metros, y portavoz de la campaña “Run for the Oceans” de Adidas, Wilson se ha distinguido por mucho tiempo por cumplir y superar sus objetivos.

Ahora, la aspirante olímpica estará disponible para ofrecer orientación y asesoramiento a los atletas más jóvenes cuando se desempeñe como “Entrenadora del día” el 16 de noviembre en la Pista de Atletismo Armory, que se enfoca en los atletas de atletismo de bachillerato.

Wilson, quien también fue nombrada Atleta Juvenil del Año 2011 por el Comité Juvenil de Atletismo de los Estados Unidos, se unirá a otras estrellas, como la velocista y corredora de vallas Sydney McLaughlin, y al poseedor del récord en interiores en el salto con garrocha y medallista olímpico de plata Lawrence Johnson, entre otros, para ofrecer instrucción única a los estudiantes atletas en el Centro de Atletismo Armory New Balance.

El espacio es familiar para Wilson, ya que estuvo allí durante los Juegos Millrose el 9 de febrero de 2019, cuando estableció ese récord estadounidense de 800 metros en interiores, con un tiempo explosivo de 1:58:60.

“Estoy muy emocionada de pasar el día compartiendo mis experiencias y escuchando sobre las suyas”, dice Wilson sobre el campamento. También recientemente se tomó un tiempo para una sesión de preguntas y respuestas.

PREGUNTA: ¿Qué significa para ti volver a The Armory, donde has tenido tanto éxito, y dar consejos a los corredores de bachillerato?

WILSON: Es tan especial volver a The Armory para dar consejos a los estudiantes de bachillerato. Por un lado, no parece haber pasado tanto tiempo desde que estuve en la misma posición. Recuerdo que los estudiantes universitarios regresaron y nos hablaron en la preparatoria, y el efecto que tuvo en mí. Entonces, estoy emocionada de estar en una posición similar y espero tener un impacto similar.

 

La aspirante olímpica fungirá como “Entrenadora del día”.

PREGUNTA: ¿A qué edad sabías que podías sobresalir en el atletismo en camino hacia una carrera profesional, y cómo llegaste a esta conclusión?

WILSON: Empecé a creer que realmente podría sobresalir en la pista en el verano después de mi segundo año, así que a los 16 años llegué a mi primer equipo nacional y me coloqué en el quinto lugar en el Campeonato Mundial Juvenil en Moncton, Canadá, ese año. Hasta este punto, la pista seguía siendo un hobby, algo que me encantaba hacer porque era divertido, y me encantaba competir. En Worlds, vi cuán diferentes eran mis compañeros en comparación. No entrenaba tan duro, no era tan disciplinada y no estaba tan interesada en lo que estaba haciendo. Me alejé pensando cuánto mejor sería si me dedicaba de la misma manera en que ellos lo hacían. Quería volver en dos años y ganar.

 

El campamento se lleva a cabo en el Centro de Atletismo Armory New Balance.

PREGUNTA: Durante el próximo campamento, ¿qué será lo más importante que le puedas decir a los chicos de bachillerato?

WILSON: Creo que lo más importante es que no hay una sola fórmula para el éxito y, lo que es más importante, está bien fallar en el camino. Tengo que agradecer a mis padres por la perspectiva que tengo del éxito en la pista, y en cualquier aspecto de mi vida realmente. El éxito en la pista me impulsa, pero no me define. Ser “buena corriendo” no es mi mayor fortaleza/atributo. Lo mejor que tengo que dar no es mi talento en la pista. La pista es simplemente el medio a través del cual puedo mostrar esas cosas. Recordar eso no me hace menos comprometida con lo que hago, pero me ayuda a equilibrar las tensiones y los altibajos que conlleva correr.

 

Wilson (al centro) con sus compañeros corredores Noah Lyles y Drew Hunter en los Juegos Boston Boost.

PREGUNTA: Cuando estabas en la preparatoria, ¿cuán enfocada estabas en el entrenamiento, la nutrición, el mantenimiento de un alto nivel académico y en disfrutar la vida de adolescente?

WILSON: Cuando estaba en el bachillerato, mis estudios eran mi principal prioridad. Cuando era necesario, me perdía prácticas para estudiar para exámenes importantes u omitía otras actividades extracurriculares para proyectos escolares importantes. En cuanto a la pista y el entrenamiento, me concentré más a medida que crecí, pero fue un proceso lento. Mis padres ayudaron en gran medida en ese cambio. Comía bien cuando estaba en casa, pero no era tan buena como ahora para frenar mi amor por los dulces y otras golosinas. Con el entrenamiento, me río al recordar cómo mi madre se estacionaba cruzando la calle para asegurarse de que estaba haciendo lo que se suponía que debía hacer en las prácticas. Disfrutar de la vida sin la etiqueta de corredor era tan importante para mí como lo es ahora. El equilibrio es muy importante con cualquier cosa que hagas en la vida, por lo que de alguna manera siempre encontré tiempo para salir con amigos, estaba en un puñado de clubes y trabajaba en algunos momentos.

 

Wilson es la actual poseedora del récord estadounidense en exteriores e interiores en los 800 metros.

PREGUNTA: ¿Quién fue la persona que te dio el mejor consejo cuando estabas en preparatoria y cuál fue? y, ¿hubo un atleta de atletismo al que admiraste que te dio una motivación extra?

WILSON: Indiscutiblemente, diría que mi madre me dio el mejor consejo en la preparatoria, aunque realmente no puedo precisar palabras exactas o anécdotas que me quedaron. En cambio, solo recuerdo cómo me hizo sentir. Ella me enseñó que podía obtener lo que quería en la vida averiguando cómo y luego comprometiéndome a alcanzar esa meta. Claro y simple, sin excusas. El dicho “querer es poder” creo que captura muy bien el sentimiento. Hasta el día de hoy, cada vez que me enfrento a una decisión difícil, un conflicto o tengo una meta que quiero alcanzar, pienso: “¿Cuál es la solución?”. Busco la mejor manera de obtener el resultado que quiero, y luego me comprometo. Cuando estás comprometido con el objetivo final, encontrar formas de superar los obstáculos u obstáculos que se presentan en el camino es un poco más fácil. Hay muchas maneras de llegar a donde quieres ir. Solo necesitas resolverlo.

En el bachillerato, había un puñado de atletas a los que admiraba y que me inspiraban. Muchos de los cuales también estaban en la preparatoria. Sin embargo, diría que más admiro a Jillian Smith, quien era una corredora de 800 del sur regional. Ella era la reina de la pista cuando comencé la preparatoria, y la había corrido varias veces y admiraba lo fácil que parecía ser para ella. En mi último año, quería ser tan dominante en el estado como ella.

 

Drew Hunter también fungirá como “Entrenador del día”.

PREGUNTA: ¿Cuáles son tus objetivos para el 2020?

WILSON: ¡Todavía estoy trabajando en mi lista de objetivos para 2020! La temporada baja está llegando a su fin, así que he estado pensando cada vez más en lo que quiero lograr este año. ¡En la pista, mi objetivo principal es ser feliz, saludable y rápida para 2020! Con suerte, al final de la temporada, eso implicará ser una medallista olímpica (preferiblemente de oro). Fuera de la pista, quiero elegir un nuevo pasatiempo. ¡Me estoy inclinando por aprender a coser!

 

Para inscribirse y obtener más información sobre The Armory Indoor Track, visite armorycamp.org.