Stoking new fires
CCCADI prepara nuevas oficinas centrales

  • English
  • Español

Stoking new fires

Story by Gregg McQueen

La estación de bomberos será renovada para convertirse en las nuevas oficinas centrales del Centro Cultural del Instituto de Diáspora Africana (CCCADI, por sus siglas en inglés).

The firehouse will be the new headquarters for the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI).

Who said you can’t get much these days for a dollar?

A former East Harlem fire station will be fueling creative fires after being transformed into a multi-use cultural center within the next year.

The historic, long-vacant firehouse at 120 East 125th Street will be renovated to become the new headquarters for the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), which will host educational programming, live performances, conferences, spiritual gatherings and artist residencies.

Through partnership with city agencies, the building was sold to CCCADI for the sum of $1. A capital campaign raised $5.5 million in funds needed for renovations.

Founded in 1976, CCCADI’s mission has been to combine arts and advocacy to document African traditions that have been uprooted to the Caribbean and the Americas.

The institute focuses on community issues and is meant to inspire the quest for social justice and cultural equality, said Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, President and Founder of CCCADI.

“We are in service to the community,” said Dr. Vega.

Se llevó un evento de erigir la primera piedra en la estación de bomberos. Foto: Line Krogh

The groundbreaking event was held at the firehouse.
Photo: Line Krogh

The cultural center was made possible through a partnership between CCCADI, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) and the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), as well as funding assistance from State Senator Bill Perkins and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Sen. Perkins said his office has contributed over a million dollars to the project over the past few years.

“We are so grateful for all the elected officials, government agencies, local nonprofits and businesses that helped to bring this project to life,” remarked Dr. Vega.

“We will celebrate diversity in the arts and bring key cultural programs that focus on Caribbean African history, providing accessible art opportunities for youth, families and residents of Harlem and all of New York City.”

The cultural center is scheduled to open in the fall of 2015.

On Tues., Sept.16th, a groundbreaking event was held at the firehouse site, featuring numerous officials including Speaker Mark-Viverito, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, Sen. Perkins, Assemblymember Robert Rodríguez and Commissioner of Cultural Affairs Tom Finkelpearl.

“Espero con interés las muchas maneras que el Centro seguirá enriqueciendo nuestra comunidad”, dijo la portavoz Melissa Mark-Viverito. Foto: Edwin Pagan

“I look forward to the many ways that CCCADI will continue to enrich our community,” said Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.
Photo: Edwin Pagan

“As a resident of this neighborhood, I look forward to the many ways that CCCADI will continue to enrich our community,” said Speaker Mark-Viverito.

The firehouse, built in 1888, is the former home of Engine Company Number 36.  It received landmark status in 1997 and was decommissioned in May 2003.

The Speaker said she was glad the historic structure would be preserved.

“Thanks to the CCCADI, this landmark space will remain a treasured part of this neighborhood for everyone,” she remarked.

In 2008, CCCADI was chosen to take over the firehouse after NYCEDC and the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development solicited requests for proposals from nonprofit organizations on how to repurpose the site.

“We’ve been working on this project for about seven years now,” said Dr. Vega.  “Our dream is finally about to be realized, so it’s an exciting time.”

The remodeling of the firehouse will be managed by NYCEDC, under the direction of DCA.

“There are a lot of details that go into renovating, since it’s such an old building,” she added.

Bateristas tradicionales de África del Oeste tocaron. Foto: Line Krogh

Traditional West African drummers from performance troupe Songhai Djeli performed.
Photo: Line Krogh

“It’s an architectural challenge to transform an 1888 Romanesque Revival firehouse into a green LEED-certified world-class cultural center,” agreed Kerry McCarthy, New York Community Trust Program Officer for Arts and Historic Preservation.

Once renovated, the three-story firehouse will have two floors dedicated to exhibition and multi-use space to host a variety of programs. The top floor will be reserved for administration, with CCCADI’s offices and meeting rooms.

With the opening of its new headquarters, Dr. Vega said that CCCADI will be centrally located near the audience it is best equipped to serve, connecting the culturally diverse West, Central and East Harlem neighborhoods.

“Now we can be more reflective of the communities that we’re trying to represent,” she said.

Previously, the institute operated out of a brownstone on 58th Street.

De izquierda a derecha: Presidente de ‘Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone’ Mario Baeza, Dr. Vega, y miembro de la junta CCCADI Sandina Sánchez. Foto: Sterling Batson

From left to right: Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Chairman Mario Baeza, Dr. Vega, and CCCADI Board Member Sandina Sánchez.
Photo: Sterling Batson

Vega said she was particularly looking forward to offering programs that highlight issues currently facing Harlem residents, such as obesity, gentrification and inequitable funding for public schools.

At the groundbreaking event, Assemblymember Rodriguez said he was “excited” that CCCADI will find a permanent home in El Barrio.

“In fact, there is no better place for it to grow and thrive, at the intersection of diverse cultures and across generations,” he said.

For more information on the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, visit www.cccadi.org.

CCCADI prepara nuevas oficinas centrales

Historia por Gregg Moqueen

Se llevó un evento de erigir la primera piedra en la estación de bomberos. Foto: Line Krogh

Se llevó un evento de erigir la primera piedra en la estación de bomberos.
Foto: Line Krogh

¿Quién dijo que no se puede conseguir mucho en estos días por un dólar?

Una antigua estación de bomberos en el Este de Harlem estará alimentando los fuegos creativos luego de que sea transformada en un centro multicultural dentro del próximo año.

La histórica, vacía estación de bomberos en el Este de la Calle 125 será renovada para convertirse en las nuevas oficinas centrales del Centro Cultural del Instituto de Diáspora Africana (CCCADI, por sus siglas en inglés), la cual celebrará programas educativos, presentaciones en vivo, conferencias, reuniones espirituales y residencias para artistas.

A través de las asociaciones con las agencias de la ciudad, el edificio fue vendido a CCCADI por la suma de $1. Una campaña capital recaudó $5.5 millones en fondos necesitados para las renovaciones.

Fundada en el 1976, la misión de CCCADI ha sido el combinar las artes y abogar por documentar las tradiciones africanas que han sido desarraigadas del Caribe y las Américas. El Instituto se enfoca en asuntos de la comunidad y está para inspirar la búsqueda de justicia social e igualdad cultural, dijo la Dra. Marta Moreno Vega, presidenta y fundadora de CCCADI.

“Estamos al servicio de la comunidad”, dijo la Dra. Marta Moreno Vega. Foto: Jonathan Slaff

“Estamos al servicio de la comunidad”, dijo la Dra. Marta Moreno Vega.
Foto: Jonathan Slaff

“Estamos al servicio de la comunidad”, dijo la Dra. Vega.

El centro cultural fue posible a través de asociaciones entre CCCADI, el Departamento de Asuntos Culturales de la ciudad de Nueva York (DCA, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Corporación de Desarrollo Económico de la ciudad de Nueva York (NYCEDC, por sus siglas en inglés), como también asistencia con fondos del Senador Estatal Bill Perkins y la Portavoz del Concejo Melissa Mark-Viverito.

El Senador Perkins dijo que su oficina ha contribuido con más de un millón de dólares para el proyecto durante los pasados años.

“Estamos tan agradecidos de todos los funcionarios electos, agencias gubernamentales, organización locales sin fines de lucro y comercios que ayudaron a darle vida a este proyecto”, comentó la Dra. Vega.

“Celebraremos la diversidad en las artes y traer programas culturales claves que se enfocan en la historia africana caribeña, proveyendo oportunidades de arte accesibles para los jóvenes, familias y residentes de Harlem y para toda la ciudad de Nueva York”.

El centro cultural está pautado para abrir en el otoño del 2015.

“Espero con interés las muchas maneras que el Centro seguirá enriqueciendo nuestra comunidad”, dijo la portavoz Melissa Mark-Viverito. Foto: Edwin Pagan

“Espero con interés las muchas maneras que el Centro seguirá enriqueciendo nuestra comunidad”, dijo la portavoz Melissa Mark-Viverito.
Foto: Edwin Pagan

El martes, 16 de septiembre, se llevó un evento de erigir la primera piedra en el lugar de la estación de bomberos, presentando numerosos funcionarios incluyendo al Senador Perkins, la Portavoz del Concejo Mark-Viverito, el presidente del condado de Manhattan Gale Brewer, el Asambleísta Robert Rodríguez y el Comisionado de Asuntos Culturales de NYC Tom Finkelpearl.

“Como residente de este vecindario, espero con interés las muchas maneras que el Centro Cultural del Instituto de Diáspora Africana seguirá enriqueciendo nuestra comunidad”, dijo Mark-Viverito.

La estación de bomberos, construida en el 1888, es el antiguo hogar de la Compañía de Bomberos Numero 36. Recibió un titulo de lugar histórico en el 1997 y fue clausurada en mayo del 2003.

La Portavoz dijo que estaba contenta de que la histórica estructura seria preservada.

“Gracias a CCCADI, este lugar histórico seguirá siendo una atesorada parte de este vecindario para todo el mundo”, comentó.

En el 2008, el CCCADI fue escogido para tomar posesión de la estación de bomberos luego de que NYCEDC y el Departamento de Preservación y Desarrollo de Viviendas de la ciudad solicitara peticiones de propuestas de organizaciones sin fines de lucro de cómo reutilizar el lugar.

“Hemos estado trabajando en este proyecto por aproximadamente siete años”, dijo la Dra. Vega. “Nuestro sueño está finalmente a punto de realizarse, así es que es un momento emocionante”.

La remodelación de la estación de bomberos será dirigida por NYCEDC, bajo la dirección de DCA.

Un nuevo hogar para la cultura se establecerá en el Este de Harlem. Marionetas gigantes ‘Bunrakju’ representan, de izquierda a derecha, Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Frida Kahlo, Marcus Garvey, y Julia De Burgos. Figuras por Adrian "Viajero" Roman Foto: Edwin Pagan

Un nuevo hogar para la cultura se establecerá en el Este de Harlem. Marionetas gigantes ‘Bunrakju’ representan, de izquierda a derecha, Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Frida Kahlo, Marcus Garvey, y Julia De Burgos. Figuras por Adrian “Viajero” Roman
Foto: Edwin Pagan

“Hay muchos detalles que van con la renovación, ya que es un edificio tan viejo”, añadió ella.

“Es un reto arquitectónico el transformar una estaciona de bomberos de renacimiento románico del 1888 en un centro cultural certificado ‘LEED’ de clase mundial”, estuvieron de acuerdo Kerry McCarthy, Oficial del Programa de Fideicomiso Comunal de Nueva York para las Artes y Preservación Histórica.

Una vez renovado, la estación de bomberos de tres pisos tendrá dos pisos dedicados a la exhibición y espacio multiuso para auspiciar una variedad de programas. El piso de arriba será reservado para administración, con las oficinas de CCCADI y salones de reuniones.

Con la apertura de sus nuevas oficinas centrales, la Dra. Vega dijo que CCCADI estará ubicada céntricamente para la audiencia que mejor está equipada para servir, conectando los culturalmente diversos vecindarios del Oeste, Central y Este de Harlem.

“Ahora podemos representar mejor las comunidades que estamos tratando de representar”, dijo ella.
Anteriormente el Instituto operaba de una casa en la Calle 58.

CCCADI fue escogido para tomar posesión de la estación de bomberos en el 2008. Foto by Sterling Batson

CCCADI fue escogido para tomar posesión de la estación de bomberos en el 2008.
Foto by Sterling Batson

Vega dijo que ella particularmente estaba deseosa de ofrecer programas que destacaran los asuntos que enfrentan actualmente los residentes de Harlem, tales como obesidad, segregación y desigual financiación de las escuelas públicas.

En el evento de la primera piedra, el Asambleísta Rodríguez dijo que estaba “emocionado” de que CCCADI encontrara un hogar permanente en El Barrio.

“De hecho, no hay un mejor lugar para crecer y prosperar, en la intersección de diversas culturas y a través de generaciones”, señaló.

Para más información sobre el Centro Cultural del Instituto de Diáspora Africana, visite www.cccadi.org.