Speaking out on tenant abuse leads to a family’s eviction
Hablar del abuso a inquilinos llevó a una familia al desalojo

  • English
  • Español

Speaking out on tenant abuse leads to a family’s eviction

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Maria Montealegre and her family have been evicted from their apartment due, they say, to her work in attempting to organize tenants for better living conditions.

Maria Montealegre and her family have been
evicted from their apartment due, they say, to
her work in attempting to organize tenants for
better living conditions.

At 4 in the afternoon many people are preparing to come home after a long day’s work.

Maria Montealegre, a flower seller, however, spent a long day getting out of her home.

By 4 p.m., this past Mon., Aug. 13th, her entire life was laid out on the sidewalk in

front of her apartment at 1985 Amsterdam Avenue on 158th Street.

All of her and her four children’s possessions amounted to a sprawling pile of boxes that sat under the hot summer sun.

Her youngest son, age 10, poked his finger into a white box containing the family cat.

“Have you fed her yet?” asked Montealegre gently.

“Yes, mom,” he said proudly.

The two shared a tearful hug.

It was their last chance to embrace in front their apartment before the marshal came to take possession and make their eviction official.

After the eviction would come the scramble to find shelter.

The family claimed the apartment was neglected, with deteriorating walls and ceilings, water leaks and rat infestations.

The family claimed the apartment was neglected,
with deteriorating walls and ceilings, water leaks
and rat infestations.

The marshal’s arrival made their homelessness legally official, but assuring them a spot in a shelter beforehand is against procedure.

“Eviction is psychological torture,” said Rolando, one of several volunteers from the Mirabal Sisters Cultural and Community Center who had spent the day helping Montealegre move out of her apartment.

Yet despite the difficult circumstances, Montealegre somehow found time to worry about the family cat.

Caring for others, however, is nothing new.

It was seemingly her concern for others that sparked the ire of her landlord, Moshe Samhova.

While Montealegre lacked heat in the winter, there was plenty of water leaking from the toilet, the kitchen sink and the ceiling. If the family wanted hot water, they boiled it in a pot. The walls were peeling and mottled with mold.

A cracked tile above the bathtub was used as a thoroughfare for rats as they came into apartment; they left their feces in the bathtub on their way out.

The family’s possessions were piled into boxes on the street.

The family’s possessions were piled into boxes on the street.

“The smell was terrible,” she recalled, with a shudder.

At the urging of the Mirabal Sisters, Montealegre tried to organize other tenants in the building. She knew she wasn’t the only one with so many problems.

“It’s worse in some of the other apartments,” she reported.

Montealegre’s son cared for their cat while the family and volunteers helped to move their possessions out.

Montealegre’s son cared
for their cat while the
family and volunteers
helped to move their
possessions out.

But her activism was not without its dangers.

Last August, Samhova attacked Montealegre and earned himself a restraining order that prohibited him from entering his own building.

Montealegre says she continued to pay her rent in cash, as she and the other tenants had been doing all along, though Samhova never gave receipts to corroborate payment.

Despite Samhova’s record, a housing court judge ruled in his favor when he took her to court for allegedly failing to pay rent.

Without receipts, she could not prove that she had, and no one from the building testified in her favor for fear of repercussion.

“The majority would prefer to keep their apartment so they don’t have to end up in the street like me,” said Montealegre. “Everyone complained, but they should have done it publicly.”

Not only did Montealegre lose her apartment, but she said her name had been blacklisted, making it difficult to find a new one.

Luis Tejada, Exeutive Director of Mirabal Sisters, reported that Laurel Lau, the judge that handled Maria’s case, recently evicted two local families in similar situations.

“She’s on OUR blacklist,” he said of the judge.

Indeed, New York City is full of damning lists, and one of them is Public Advocate Bill de Blasio’s lists of top ten worst landlords; these tinclude a citywide list and lists for each borough.

Moshe Samhova is number twelve on the Manhattan list.

Samhova did not return calls or messages for comment.

The eviction notice on the Montealegre’s family’s home on Amsterdam Avenue.

The eviction notice on the
Montealegre’s family’s home
on Amsterdam Avenue.

In the whole city, six of the top ten worst landlords are in the Bronx. In the borough of Manhattan, all of the top ten worst landlords are above 120th Street, exhibiting trends that indicate disproportionately high levels of neglect in lower-income neighborhoods.

Furthermore, half the city’s evictions in 2011 occurred in the Bronx and Manhattan, while over one third of the city’s 26,666 marshal possessions occurred in the Bronx.

“It’s very frequent that we have cases like this where people are being pushed out of their apartments and even though the buildings have hundreds of violations the landlords get away with all of this,” said Karina Aybar-Jacobs, the director of Dominican Women’s

Development Center. She and other members of the DWDC were on hand on Monday trying to find Maria a place to stay.

Aybar-Jabobs pointed to gentrification as being one of the main causes and praised Maria for her courage and hopes others will follow her example.

“Tenants need to speak up and not to be afraid and come forward. It’s really hard, but we need to denounce this and the more we unite the more change and mobilization we can have.”

Maria Montealegre said she was naturally dispirited by the turn of events, but resolute in asking for others to continue to step forward.

“I don’t want anyone else to have this happen to them,” she said.

Hablar del abuso a inquilinos llevó a una familia al desalojo

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

A las 4 de la tarde muchas personas se están preparando para irse a casa luego de un largo día de trabajo.

Sin embargo, María Montealegre, una vendedora de flores, pasó un largo día de trabajo saliendo de su hogar.

The family’s possessions were piled into boxes on the street.

Las posesiones de la familia fueron colocadas en cajas en la calle.

A las 4 p.m. este pasado lunes, 13 de agosto, su vida estaba en la acera frente del 1985 de la Avenida Amsterdam y la Calle 158.

Todas sus posesiones y las de sus cuatro hijos se convirtieron en una montaña de cajas que descansaban bajo el caliente sol del verano.

The eviction notice on the Montealegre’s family’s home on Amsterdam Avenue.

La notificación de desalojo del
hogar de la familia Montealegre
en la Avenida Amsterdam.

Su hijo menor de 10 años, metía el dedo en una caja blanca que contenía el gato de la familia.
¿“Ya le diste comida?”, le preguntó Montealegre suavemente.

“Si mami”, dijo orgullosamente.

Los dos compartieron un lloroso abrazo.

Era su última oportunidad de abrazarse al frente de su apartamento antes de que el mariscal llegara para tomar posesión y hacer su desalojo oficial.

Luego del desalojo vendría la lucha de buscar albergue.

La llegada del mariscal hizo su falta de hogar legalmente oficial, pero asegurarle un lugar en un albergue de antemano es contra el procedimiento.

“El desahucio es una tortura sicológica”, dijo Rolando, uno de varios voluntarios del Centro Cultural y Comunal de las Hermanas Mirabal que había pasado el día ayudando a Montealegre a salir de su apartamento.

Aunque a pesar de las difíciles circunstancias, Montealegre de alguna manera encontró tiempo para preocuparse por el gato de la familia.

Sin embargo, el cuidar de los demás no es algo nuevo.

Aparentemente su preocupación por otros fue lo que despertó la ira del propietario del edificio, Moshe Samhova.

Mientras que Montealegre no tenía calefacción en el invierno, había suficiente agua goteando del inodoro, el fregadero de la cocina y el techo. Si la familia quería agua caliente, la calentaban en una olla. Las paredes se estaban pelando y moteadas con hongo.

Montealegre’s son cared for their cat while the family and volunteers helped to move their possessions out.

El hijo de Montealegre cuida a
su gato mientras la familia y
voluntarios ayudaban a sacar
sus posesiones afuera.

Un azulejo roto encima de la bañera era utilizado como vía gratuita de las ratas para entrar al apartamento; dejando a su salida sus excrementos en la bañera.

“El olor era terrible”, recordó con un estremecimiento.

A instancias de las Hermanas Mirabal, Montealegre trató de organizar a otros inquilinos en el edificio. Ella sabía que no era la única con tantos problemas.

“En otros apartamentos es peor”, reportó ella.

Pero su activismo no fue sin sus peligros.

El pasado agosto. Samhova atacó a Montealegre y se ganó una orden de alejamiento que le prohibía entrar a su propio edificio.

Montealegre dijo que ella continuó pagando su renta en efectivo, como ella y otros inquilinos habían estado haciendo todo el tiempo, pero Samhova nunca dio recibos para corroborar el pago.

A pesar del récord de Samhova, un juez de la corte de vivienda falló a su favor cuando este le llevó a la corte alegadamente por no pagar la renta.

Sin recibos, ella no pudo probar que lo había hecho, y nadie de su edificio testificó a su favor por miedo a repercusiones.

“La mayoría preferió mantener su apartamento para así no tener que terminar en la calle como yo”, dijo Montealegre. “Todo el mundo se queja, pero lo deberían de haber hecho públicamente”.

No solo Montealegre perdió su apartamento, sino que dijo que su nombre ha sido colocado en la lista negra, lo que dificulta encontrar uno nuevo.

The family claimed the apartment was neglected, with deteriorating walls and ceilings, water leaks and rat infestations.

La familia alegó que el apartamento estaba
descuidado, con deterioradas paredes y techos,
filtraciones de agua y plaga de ratas.

Luis Tejada, Director Ejecutivo de las Hermanas Mirabal, reportó que Laurel Lau, el juez que manejó el caso de María, recientemente había desalojado a dos familias locales en situaciones similares.

“Ella (la Jueza Lau) está en NUESTRA lista negra”, dijo el acerca del juez.

De hecho, la ciudad de Nueva York está llena de listas condenables, y una de ella es la lista del Defensor Público Bill de Blasio de los principales diez peores dueños de edificio; esta incluye una lista de la ciudad y listas de cada condado.

Moshe Samhova es el número doce en la lista de Manhattan.

Samhova no devolvió llamadas o mensajes para comentar.

En la ciudad entera, seis de los principales diez peores dueños de edificios están en el Bronx. En el condado de Manhattan, todos los principales diez peores dueños de edificios están al norte de la Calle 120, exhibiendo tendencias que indican desproporcionados altos niveles de negligencia en vecindarios de bajos ingresos.

Además, la mitad de los desalojos en el 2011 ocurrieron en el Bronx y Manhattan, mientras que un tercio de las 26,666 posesiones de mariscales ocurrieron en el Bronx.

Maria Montealegre and her family have been evicted from their apartment due, they say, to her work in attempting to organize tenants for better living conditions.

María Montealegre y su familia fueron
desalojados de su apartamento debido a, dicen
ellos, su trabajo en intentar a organizar a los
inquilinos para mejorar las condiciones de vida.

“Es bien frecuente que tengamos casos como este donde las personas son sacadas de sus apartamentos y aunque los edificios tienen cientos de violaciones los dueños se salen con la suya”, dijo Karina Aybar-Jacobs, directora del Centro de Desarrollo de la Mujer Dominicana. Ella y otros miembros de DWDC estuvieron disponibles el lunes tratando de conseguirle a María un lugar donde quedarse.

Aybar-Jacobs señaló la burguesía como una de las principales causas y elogió a María por su valor y espera que otros sigan su ejemplo.

“Los inquilinos tienen que hablar y no tener miedo e ir hacia delante. Es realmente difícil, pero tenemos que denunciar esto y mientras más se unan, más cambios y movilización podemos tener”.
María Montealegre dijo que estaba naturalmente desalentada por el giro de los acontecimientos, pero decidida en pedirle a otros que continúen hacia delante.

“Yo no quiero que a nadie más le suceda esto”, dijo ella.