EducationHealthLocalNewsPolitics/Government

Sounding off on school conditions
Quejas sobre las condiciones en las escuelas

Sounding off on school conditions

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


"The safety of students is being put at risk,” said City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito about deteriorated schools conditions.
“The safety of students is being put at risk,” said City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito about deteriorated schools conditions.

On Wed., May 8th, school maintenance workers, City Council members and education advocates gathered on the steps of Tweed Courthouse in lower Manhattan to release findings of a new report detailing the poor physical condition of many New York City public schools, particularly those in poorer neighborhoods, including many in northern Manhattan and the Bronx.

The report, as issued by Local 32BJ, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), revealed that less than two percent of public school buildings are considered by the city to be in “good” condition, and approximately half the facilities received a rating of “fair.”

Many have faulty electrical, heating and plumbing systems, as well as PCB-contaminated lighting fixtures.

“These conditions are unacceptable,” stated City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito. “The safety of students is being put at risk.”

"We are saying enough is enough,” said 32BJ president Hector Figueroa.
“We are saying enough is enough,” said 32BJ president Hector Figueroa.

Local 32BJ includes more than 5,000 public school cleaners and handypersons in New York.

Angry union members waved signs and chanted slogans, calling upon the Department of Education (DOE), which is headquartered in the courthouse, to improve conditions and increase funding for public school maintenance.

“There are more than 3,000 building code violations and over 5,000 environmental violations in our public schools,” said 32BJ president Hector Figueroa. “We are saying enough is enough, and we want the DOE to take action.”

Also present was Shirley Aldebol, 32BJ SEIU Vice President.

Rahn Wade, a school custodian at PS 197 in Harlem, told the crowd that conditions in the schools are dismal.

“Imagine a child going to school in a building that’s poorly lit, and with bathrooms that don’t work properly,” remarked Wade. “It isn’t fair and it isn’t safe.”

“If my toilets or lights at home didn’t work, the state might come take my children away,” said Zakiyah Ansari, advocacy director for the Alliance for Quality Education, to the assembled protesters. “How can this be acceptable in our schools?”

"It isn't fair and it isn't safe,” said Rahn Wade, a 32BJ SEIU member and custodian at PS 197 in Harlem.
“It isn’t fair and it isn’t safe,” said Rahn Wade, a 32BJ SEIU member and custodian at PS 197 in Harlem.

Officials from 32BJ said that the school buildings in the city’s poorest neighborhoods are in the worst condition. An assessment study showed that schools in locations with a high poverty rate tended to be in a greater state of disrepair.

“If you look at the educational system, we live in a segregated city,” City Councilmember Jumaane Williams told the crowd. He said that the disparity in building conditions adversely affects children of color, which leads to inequality and widens the achievement gap.

Figueroa cited a study by the Green Building Council that linked the condition of school facilities with academic performance.

“We’re putting our students behind by subjecting them to these conditions,” he said.

“We send a message to our most vulnerable students that their success matters less than that of students in better-maintained facilities,” added Councilmember Mark-Viverito.

Photos submitted anonymously reveal poorly maintained conditions at area schools.
Photos submitted anonymously reveal poorly maintained conditions at area schools.

Several attendees at the rally charged that Mayor Bloomberg’s legacy regarding education will be one of failure, as these conditions festered under his tenure, which was has been marked by dramatic budget cuts.

New York City school spending is at a nine-year low, and has endured cuts of almost $50 million to custodial budgets in that period.

Wade said that these budget cuts have tied the hands of school maintenance workers and prevented them for making timely repairs. Years of deferred maintenance and inadequate facilities have taken a toll.

“We don’t have the parts we need to fix things,” stated Wade. “We can’t get the right equipment.”

Carl Campbell, a school handyman, said that when school fixtures require serious repairs beyond the scope of the everyday staff, the DOE will typically send in a crew to handle it.

Workers gathered at Department of Education headquarters at the Tweed Courthouse.
Workers gathered at Department of Education headquarters at the Tweed Courthouse.

“But that sometimes won’t happen for months,” he explained. “And it seems like, if you’re in the wrong neighborhood, things won’t get fixed.”

Those at the rally also decried the slow replacement of fluorescent lights containing PCBs, a toxic substance that has been banned but is still existent in the city’s aging fixtures.

The city is replacing these lighting components over a ten-year period, and there are over 900 schools still on the waiting list.

Just the day before, on Tues., May 7th, nine students and two staff members from Harlem’s PS 123 had been sent to a hospital and treated for smoke irritation after a light fixture emitted smoke and fumes.

The crowd at the courthouse repeatedly shouted “No more!” as the incident was discussed.

“There should be no building in the city that has toxins in the ceiling,” said Ocynthia Williams of United Parents of Highbridge, a parent-led organization created to improve the Bronx school system. “The city has the power to control the quality of school buildings.”

Councilmember Mark-Viverito pledged that she will have the City Council prioritize these issues and implore the mayor’s office to allocate more funding.

“We must tell people the truth about these conditions,” she said, “and the city must do everything possible to correct them.”

Quejas sobre las condiciones en las escuelas

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen


"The safety of students is being put at risk,” said City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito about deteriorated schools conditions.
“The safety of students is being put at risk,” said City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito about deteriorated schools conditions.

El miércoles 8 de mayo, trabajadores de mantenimiento escolar, miembros del Concejo de la Ciudad y defensores de la educación se reunieron en las escalinatas de Tweed Courthouse en el bajo Manhattan para dar a conocer resultados de un nuevo informe que detalla el mal estado físico de muchas escuelas públicas de Nueva York, en particular los de los barrios más pobres, como muchos en el Bronx y el norte de Manhattan.

El informe reveló que la ciudad considera que menos del 2% de los edificios escolares públicos están en “buena” condición, y aproximadamente la mitad de las instalaciones recibieron una calificación de “aceptable”.

Muchos tienen sistemas eléctricos, de calefacción y fontanería defectuosas, así como luminarias contaminadas con PCB.

“Estas condiciones son inaceptables”, declaró la concejal Melissa Mark-Viverito. “La seguridad de los estudiantes se está poniendo en riesgo”.

"We are saying enough is enough,” said 32BJ president Hector Figueroa.
“Estamos diciendo que ya es suficiente”, dijo Hector Figueroa, presidente del 32BJ.

El informe fue publicado por la Local 32BJ, una filial de la Unión Internacional de empleados de servicios, que incluye más de 5,000 limpiadores de escuelas públicas y empleados de mantenimiento en Nueva York.

Sindicalistas enojados mostraban pancartas y coreaban consignas, pidiendo al Departamento de Educación (DOE por sus siglas en inglés), que tiene su sede en el palacio de justicia, mejorar las condiciones y aumentar el financiamiento para el mantenimiento de las escuelas públicas.

“Hay más de 3,000 violaciones al código de construcción y más de 5,000 violaciones ambientales en nuestras escuelas públicas”, dijo el presidente de la 32BJ Héctor Figueroa. “Estamos diciendo que ya es suficiente y queremos que el DOE tome acción”.

Rahn Wade, un conserje escolar en la Escuela Pública 197 en Harlem, dijo a la multitud que las condiciones en las escuelas son deprimentes.

“Imagínese a un niño que va a la escuela en un edificio que está poco iluminado y con baños que no funcionan adecuadamente”, comentó Wade. “No es justo y no es seguro”.

“Si mis inodoros o luces en casa no funcionan, el Estado podría quitarme a mis hijos”, dijo Zakiyah Ansari, directora de la Alianza por la defensa de la calidad educativa, a los manifestantes reunidos. “¿Cómo pueden ser aceptables estas condiciones en nuestras escuelas?”

"It isn't fair and it isn't safe,” said Rahn Wade, a 32BJ SEIU member and custodian at PS 197 in Harlem.
“No es justo y no es seguro”, dijo Rahn Wade, un conserje escolar en la Escuela Pública 197 en Harlem.

Funcionarios de la 32BJ dijeron que los edificios escolares en los barrios más pobres de la ciudad están en las peores condiciones. Un estudio de evaluación demostró que las escuelas en lugares con una alta tasa de pobreza tienden a tener un mayor estado de deterioro.

“Si nos fijamos en el sistema educativo, vivimos en una ciudad segregada”, dijo el concejal Jumaane Williams a la multitud. Señaló que la disparidad de las condiciones del edificio afecta negativamente a los niños de color, lo que conduce a la desigualdad y ensancha la brecha de rendimiento.

Figueroa citó un estudio realizado por el Consejo de Construcción Verde que vinculó la condición de las instalaciones escolares con el rendimiento académico.

“Estamos poniendo en desventaja a nuestros estudiantes sometiéndolos a estas condiciones”, dijo.

“Enviamos un mensaje a nuestros estudiantes más vulnerables de que su éxito es menos importante que el de los estudiantes en las instalaciones mejor cuidadas”, añadió la concejal Mark-Viverito.

Varios participantes en el mitin denunciaron que el legado del alcalde Bloomberg en materia de educación será un fracaso, ya que estas condiciones supuraban bajo su mandato, que ha estado marcado por los drásticos recortes presupuestales.

Workers gathered at Department of Education headquarters at the Tweed Courthouse.
Trabajadores escolares protestaron frente al Departamento de Educación.

El presupuesto escolar de la ciudad de Nueva York para este renglón es el más bajo en nueve años, y ha sufrido recortes de casi $50 millones de dólares en ese período.

Wade dijo que los recortes presupuestales han atado las manos de los trabajadores de mantenimiento de la escuela y les impidió hacer las reparaciones de manera oportuna. Los años de mantenimiento diferido e instalaciones inadecuadas han hecho mella. “No tenemos las piezas que necesitamos para arreglar las cosas”, dijo Wade. “No podemos tener el equipo adecuado”.

Carl Campbell, un empleado de mantenimiento escolar, dijo que cuando los aparatos escolares requieren reparaciones serias, más allá del alcance del personal regular, el DOE normalmente envía un equipo para manejar la situación.

“Pero a veces no sucede durante meses”, explicó. “Y parece que, si estás en el barrio equivocado, las cosas no se arreglan”.

Photos submitted anonymously reveal poorly maintained conditions at area schools.
Fotos sometidas anónimamente revelan malas condiciones en varias escuelas locales.

Aquellos en la demostración también condenaron la lenta sustitución de los tubos fluorescentes que contienen PCB, una sustancia tóxica que ha sido prohibida, pero que todavía existe en aparatos viejos de la ciudad.

La ciudad está reemplazando estos componentes de iluminación en un período de diez años y hay más de 900 escuelas que continúan en la lista de espera.

Justo el día anterior, el martes 7 de mayo, nueve estudiantes y dos miembros del personal de la escuela pública 123 de Harlem fueron enviados a un hospital y recibieron tratamiento por irritación de humo, después de que un artefacto de iluminación emitió humo y gases.

La multitud en el Palacio de Justicia en repetidas ocasiones gritó “¡No más!”, mientras se discutió el incidente.

“No debería haber ningún edificio en la ciudad con toxinas en el techo”, dijo Ocynthia Williams, de Padres Unidos de Highbridge, una organización de padres creada para mejorar el sistema escolar del Bronx. “La ciudad tiene el poder de controlar la calidad de los edificios escolares”.

La concejal Mark-Viverito prometió que verá que el Ayuntamiento de prioridad a estos temas e implorará a la Alcaldía a que asigne más fondos.

“Tenemos que decirle a la gente la verdad sobre estas condiciones y la ciudad debe hacer todo lo posible para corregirlas”, dijo.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker