School’s In: Educating and engaging parents
La Escuela ha Comenzado: Educando a los padres para que participen

  • English
  • Español

School’s In: Educating and engaging parents

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer spoke at the education conference organized at City College, expressing concern, “Everybody has to come together to educate our students.”

Manhattan Borough President Scott
Stringer spoke at the education
conference organized at City
College, expressing concern,
“Everybody has to come together
to educate our students.”

For hundreds of parents this weekend, City College was the center of a vital dialogue.

This past Fri., Oct. 12th,  parents with children in New York City’s public school system, the largest in the nation, gathered for a two-day education conference.

The conference was hosted a number of elected officials, including New York City Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and New York State Senator Adriano Espaillat, together with Spanish-language television station Univision and non-profit organization The Hispanic Federation.

The forums were held in anticipation of the Department of Education’s (DOE’s) “Parents as Partners” week through Sat., Oct. 20th.

As organized by the DOE, the week is filled with opportunities across the five boroughs to encourage parents to become more involved in their children’s public school education.

The weekend conference invited parents to a series of workshops, and was capped with a luncheon and panel discussion with elected officials.

Sunlight filtered into the majestic Great Hall through stained glass windows as parents streamed in on Saturday morning and settled in.

From left to right: Josh Karan, of District 6’s Parent Leadership Training Program; Jesse Mojica, Department of Education’s Division of Family and Community Engagement Executive Director; and Adan Vasquez, a teacher at Gregorio Luperon High School, served as panelists.

From left to right: Josh Karan, of District 6’s Parent Leadership Training Program; Jesse Mojica, Department of Education’s Division of Family and Community Engagement Executive Director; and Adan Vasquez, a teacher at Gregorio Luperon High School, served as panelists.

Among them was Sorelys Irizarry, an Inwood parent of a kindergartener.

Irizarry, who is a parent volunteer on her School Leadership Team (SLT), said that parent involvement was a major concern at her child’s school.

City College was host to a weekend conference on parental involvement in the city’s public schools.

City College was host to a weekend conference
on parental involvement in the city’s public
schools.

“Some parents don’t have time. In other cases, they don’t care,” she said.

She cited issues at her school, including overcrowding and newer teachers.

“There are a lot of young, inexperienced teachers,” she added.

“They have the will, but they need coaches.”

The education workshops focused on a variety of concerns, including the role of parents; educating English Language Learners; understanding children with special needs; preparing children for kindergarten; and how to support students through high-stakes testing.

The discussion often generated strong responses from participants.

Josh Karan, director of a parent leadership group in District 6, shared a few charged exchanges with Jesse Mojica, the Department of Education’s Division of Family and Community Engagement (FACE) Executive Director during a panel discussion.

Karan, who has served as a parent advocate for decades, explicitly stated that the system does not care about children in the public school system.

Sorelys Irizarry is an involved parent at her daughter’s school: “The only thing I haven’t done is sleep at the door.”

Sorelys Irizarry is an involved parent at her
daughter’s school: “The only thing I haven’t
done is sleep at the door.”

According to Karan, ideal class size is capped at 15 students, would have one parent coordinator per 50 students, and would have full-day preschool.

Currently, class sizes in public schools cap at 32 students and there is one parent coordinator per school, while pre-school is only offered part-time.

“When I say this system doesn’t care about children in this community, that’s the evidence,” said Karan.

Mojica oversees the Office of Family Information and Action and serves as a liaison to the Panel for Educational Policy (PEP).

A long-time education activist, he had previously served as director of education policy and youth services for Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr.

“Statements that we don’t care hit home to me,” said an offended Mojica, who proffered several examples of system improvements that had been propelled by parent advocates, including plans to build a new middle school in Highbridge, and I.S. 218’s partnership with the Children’s Aid Society.

Among the fireworks, however, were suggestions that pointed to ways parents could effectively engage their schools’ leaders and staff.

Adan Vásquez, a Gregorio Luperon High School teacher, offered ideas such as school leaders hosting social events like picnics and get-togethers to open pathways for parents who feel intimidated or confused by the bureaucracies of a large school system.

Joe Rogers, founder of advocacy group Total Equity Now, is not a parent, but attended the conference as a concerned citizen.

Parents listen to elected officials at a luncheon at the Great Hall.

Parents listen to elected officials at a luncheon
at the Great Hall.

“I live in Harlem, and I got an excellent public school education,” said Rogers.

“But I realized that other people, with as much or more academic potential, didn’t have the same opportunity. It got me angry and concerned.”

Elected officials also joined in the conversation.

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer said he plans to send his son, still an infant, to public school, but is concerned.

“I worry about public education. Everybody has to come together to educate our students,” said President Stringer.

City Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and former City Comptroller Bill Thompson also spoke of the need for parental involvement.

“If we’re going to talk about a successful school system, parents need to be involved,” said Thompson.

“We need to create avenues for parents.”

Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez, who had first stepped foot inside the Great Hall for his orientation as a student at City College decades ago, said, “I never thought, while standing in this room for orientation, that I’d be your Councilmember.”

It was the education he received, he explained, that made his public service and election possible.

Former City Comptroller Bill Thompson attended the conference.

Former City Comptroller Bill Thompson
attended the conference.

He added that education is the next civil rights movement.

“We can’t just say, ‘Life is unfair,’” said Councilmember Rodriguez, making reference to a recent comment made by Mayor Michael Bloomberg regarding the small number of minority students admitted to elite public high schools.

“The system is broken and we have to fix it.”

For many of those assembled, it was a message they’d long heeded.

Mother Irizarry is already highly involved in her daughter’s school.

“The only thing I haven’t done is sleep at the door,” she laughed.

For more information and resources on parental involvement, please visit:

  • Parents as Partners Week:

www.schools.nyc.gov/ParentsFamilies/parentsaspartners

  • The Division of Family and Community Engagement at the Department of Education:

www.schools.nyc.gov/Offices/FACE/default.htm

  • The Children’s Aid Society

www.childrensaidsociety.org

 

La Escuela ha Comenzado: Educando a los padres para que participen

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer spoke at the education conference organized at City College, expressing concern, “Everybody has to come together to educate our students.”

Scott Stringer, presidente del
condado de Manhattan, dijo que
piensa registrar a su hijo infante en
la escuela pública, pero expresó
preocupación: Todo el mundo se ha
unido para educar a nuestros
estudiantes”.

Para cientos de padres,  durante este fin de semana, City College fue el centro de un diálogo vital.

Este pasado viernes 12 de octubre se vio el lanzamiento de una conferencia educativa de dos días de duración para padres con niños en el sistema escolar público de la Ciudad de Nueva York, el más grande de toda la nación.

La conferencia fue auspiciada por una serie de oficiales electos, incluyendo al Concejal de la Ciudad de Nueva York  Ydanis Rodriguez y el Senador Estatal Adriano Espaillat, conjuntamente con la estación televisora de habla hispana Univisión y la organización sin fines-de-lucro Hispanic Federation.

Los foros fueron celebrados en anticipación de la semana “Parents as Partners” del Departamento de Educación (DoE por sus siglas en inglés), a celebrarse por toda la ciudad, del lunes 15 de octubre hasta el sábado 20.

Esta semana está repleta de oportunidades en los cinco condados organizadas por el DOE para involucrar a los padres líderes en temas concernientes a la educación en la escuela pública de sus hijos.

La conferencia de este fin de semana invitó a los padres a una serie de talleres el viernes y el sábado, y el evento culminó con un almuerzo y un panel de discusión con oficiales electos.

La luz solar se filtraba a través de los vitrales del Great Hall, a medida que cientos de padres hacían su entrada, en la mañana del sábado.

Sorelys Irizarry, una madre de un alumno de pre-primaria de Inwood, dijo sentirse contenta de poder asistir.

Irizarry, quien es voluntaria del Equipo de Liderazgo Escolar (SLT por sus siglas en inglés), dijo que el involucramiento de los padres es una gran preocupación en la escuela de su niño.

“Algunos padres no tienen tiempo. En otros casos, no les importa”, dijo ella.

Ella citó otros problemas en su escuela, incluyendo hacinamiento, y nuevos maestros.

“Existen muchos profesores jóvenes, inexpertos”, agregó ella.

“Ellos tienen la voluntad, pero necesitan entrenadores”.

Parents listen to elected officials at a luncheon at the Great Hall.

Padres escuchan a los oficiales electos en el
almuerzo del Great Hall.

Los talleres educativos se enfocaron en una serie de inquietudes, incluyendo el rol de los padres en el sistema de educación pública; educando a los Aprendices del Idioma Inglés; entendiendo a niños con necesidades especiales; preparando a los niños para pre-primaria; y como respaldar a los estudiantes en los exámenes de altos cruciales.

Frecuentemente, la discusión generó fuertes respuestas de los participantes.

Josh Karan, director de un grupo de liderazgo de padres en el Distrito 6, tuvo  unos fuertes intercambios con Jesse Mojica, el Director Ejecutivo de FACE (Involucramiento Familiar y de la Comunidad), división del Departamento de Educación, cuando ambos compartieron un panel.

Karan, quien ha servido como defensor de los padres durante décadas, declaró explícitamente que al sistema no le importan los niños en el sistema de educación pública.

Conforme a Karan, el tamaño ideal para una clase es de 15 estudiantes, un padre coordinador por cada 50 estudiantes, y un pre-escolar con un día completo de escuela.

En la actualidad, el tamaño de las clases en las escuelas públicas llega al tope de 32 estudiantes y hay un padre coordinador por escuela, mientras que a el pre-escolar solo se ofrece medio día.

“Cuando digo que a este sistema no le preocupan los niños en esta comunidad, esa es la evidencia”, expresó Karan.

“Las afirmaciones de que no nos importa tocaron una fibra sensible”, dijo un ofendido Mojica, quien profirió varios ejemplos de mejoras en el sistema las cuales habían sido impulsadas por defensores de los padres, incluyendo planes para construir una nueva escuela intermedia en Highbridge, y la asociación de I.S.218 con Children’s Aid Society.

Sorelys Irizarry is an involved parent at her daughter’s school: “The only thing I haven’t done is sleep at the door.”

Sorelys Irizarry es una madre involucrada en la
escuela de su hija: “Lo único que me falta es
dormir en la puerta”.

Mojica, nativo del Bronx, supervisa la Oficina de Información y Acción Familiar, y sirve como enlace del Panel de Política de Educación (PEP por sus siglas en inglés).

Mojica, un activista en educación de muchos años, y padre de dos jóvenes niños, ha servido como director de política de educación y servicios juveniles para Rubén Díaz, Jr. Presidente del Condado del Bronx.

Sin embargo, entre las fuertes reacciones, hubo también sugerencias prácticas las que señalan métodos para que los padres puedan involucrarse de manera efectiva con los lideres y el personal de sus escuelas.

Adan Vásquez, un maestro de la Escuela Secundaria Gregorio Luperón, ofreció ideas tales como hacer que los líderes escolares celebren eventos sociales tales como dias campestres, y reuniones de información para aquellos padres que de otro modo se sentirían intimidados o confundidos por la burocracia de un gran sistema escolar.

Joe Rogers, fundador de un grupo defensor, Total Equity Now, no es padre, pero asistió a la conferencia en calidad de ciudadano preocupado.

“Yo resido en Harlem, y recibí una excelente educación pública”, dijo Rogers.

“Pero me di cuenta de que otras personas, con tanto o más potencial académico, no tenían la misma oportunidad. Me hizo sentir airado y preocupado.”

Rogers dijo que se alegraba de poder discutir el tema del involucramiento de los padres con otros miembros de la comunidad presentes en el taller.

Oficiales electos se integraron también a la conversación.

From left to right: Josh Karan, of District 6’s Parent Leadership Training Program; Jesse Mojica, Department of Education’s Division of Family and Community Engagement Executive Director; and Adan Vasquez, a teacher at Gregorio Luperon High School, served as panelists.

De derecha a izquierda: Josh Karan, de District
6 Parent Leadership Training Program; Jesse
Mojica, Director Ejecutivo del Department of
Education Division of Family and Community
Engagement; y Adan Vasquez, maestro de la
Escuela Pública Gregorio Luperon, fueron
panelistas en la conferencia.

El presidente del condado de Manhattan Scott Stringer dijo que tiene planeado enviar a su hijo, quien es todavía un infante, a la escuela pública, pero está preocupado.

“Me preocupo sobre la educación pública. Todo el mundo tiene que unirse para educar a nuestros estudiantes”, dijo el presidente Stringer.

El defensor público Bill de Blasio y el ex – contralor de la ciudad Bill Thompson hablaron también sobre la necesidad del involucramiento de los padres en las escuelas.

“Si queremos hablar sobre un sistema educativo triunfante, los padres tienen que estar envueltos,” indicó el pasado contralor Thompson.  “Necesitamos crear avenidas de participación para los padres.”

El concejal Ydanis Rodríguez, quien décadas atrás piso primeramente el Great Hall para su orientación como estudiante de City College dijo, “Yo nunca pensé, de pie en este salón para orientación, que llegaría a ser su concejal”.

El reiteró también la importancia del involucramiento de los padres en enmendar un sistema resquebrajado, agregando que la educación es el próximo movimiento de derechos civiles.

“No podemos solo decir, ‘la vida es injusta”’, dijo el concejal Rodríguez, refiriéndose a un comentario reciente del alcalde Michael Bloomberg, con relación al pequeño número de estudiantes de minorías admitidos a las mejores escuelas públicas. El sistema esta resquebrajado y tenemos que enmendarlo”.

Para muchos de los allí reunidos, fue un mensaje que hace tiempo les ameritaba atención.

Irrizarry, al igual que otros padres en la conferencia, esta ya bien involucrada en la escuela de su hija.

“Lo único que no he hecho es dormir en la puerta”, rió ella.

Para mós informes y recursos sobre involucramiento de los padres, favor visitar:

  • Parents as Partners Week:

www.schools.nyc.gov/ParentsFamilies/parentsaspartners

  • The Division of Family and Community Engagement at the Department of Education:

www.schools.nyc.gov/Offices/FACE/default.htm

  • The Children’s Aid Society

www.childrensaidsociety.org