Residents respond to soda ban passage
Residentes responden a la aprobación de la prohibición de soda

  • English
  • Español

Residents respond to soda ban passage

Story and photos by Colby Smith

The Mayor’s proposal to ban the sale of large sugary drinks was passed by the City’s Department of Health this week. Photo: Robin E. Kilmer

The Mayor’s proposal to ban the
sale of large sugary drinks was
passed by the City’s Department
of Health this week.
Photo: Robin E. Kilmer

In an 8-0-1 vote, the New York City Health Department voted on Thurs., Sept. 13th, to ban the sale of sweetened drinks larger than 16 ounces.

The intricacies of the ban are far from simple, leading many to believe that the measure may not be doing enough to combat obesity.

The unprecedented ban, originally proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg in the spring, applies to such sugary drinks as energy drinks and sodas, but does not apply to alcoholic beverages, fruit juices, or drinks that contain more than 50% milk.

And the complications do not stop there.

The ban only applies to the sale of such beverages in establishments that receive inspection ratings from the Health Department. This category includes restaurants, street vendors, and movie theater concession stands, but it does not include convenience stores or vending machines.

This loophole in the ban has lead to the criticism that the measure is not comprehensive enough in its effort to fight the rise obesity.

“A person could just buy two smaller drinks,” said Melissa Katzman, who works in the Washington Heights neighborhood.

Katzman identifies a key question, especially for local restaurant owners: Will customers really buy two drinks?

“It could be positive with people just buying more drinks,” said Kazi Islam, who manages the Dallas BBQ at 3956 Broadway, at the corner of 166th Street.

“But I lean more towards negative,” added Islam. “We cannot charge the customers as much [for a smaller drink]. The price has to come down, and we take a hit.”

And even if customers do decide to buy more soda, where will they buy it from?

Josue Feliz, who manages the McDonald’s Restaurant at 170th Street and Broadway worries about losing customers who prefer a larger drink.

“They will go where they can buy the soda,” Feliz said. “[The ban] should be for every store.”

In a statement, Councilmember Robert Jackson spoke to the fear of losing business and what he calls the “inequity” of the ban and its loophole.

“It doesn’t make sense that one establishment will be banned from selling these drinks, but right next door a bodega will be able to sell these larger sugary drinks,” Councilmember Jackson said.

“If the true goal is to curb consumers’ behavior then this inequitable policy misses the mark.”

“I think it’s probably well-intentioned but possibly not well thought out,” said David Hunt, a co-owner of Coogan’s Restaurant (shown here).

“I think it’s probably well-intentioned but
possibly not well thought out,” said David Hunt,
a co-owner of Coogan’s Restaurant (shown here).

Councilmember Jackson also characterized the measure as an unwelcome government intrusion into private life.

“As a society, we have the responsibility to educate for self-empowerment and not dictate to free minded adults what they can or cannot consume,” he said.

Members of the New Yorkers for Beverage Choices, an advocacy group that is backed by the beverage industry, were also quick to denounce the decision.

“The fix was in from the beginning, and the Mayor’s handpicked board followed their orders by passing this discriminatory ban; but it has not passed with the support of New Yorkers,” said Liz Berman, president of Continental Food & Beverage, Inc., and chairwoman of New Yorkers for Beverage Choices.

“It’s sad that the board wants to limit our choices.

We are smart enough to make our own decisions about what to eat and drink.”

Moreover, recent surveys have indicated that a majority of New Yorkers do not approve of the ban.

In a poll cited by The New York Times, 60 percent of New Yorkers believe the ban to be a “bad idea” and the coalition claims that more than 250,000 New Yorkers have signed on to the Coalition.

Northern Manhattan residents, however, seem to be divided on the issue.

“I think it absolutely is [a step in the right direction],” said Larkin McReynolds, an Assistant Professor at Columbia University’s Department of Epidemiology. “Given the rise of obesity and how it’s linked to diabetes, it’s probably necessary.”

Other residents were not quite so sure.

Councilmember Robert Jackson, who conducted tours in his district on the issue, criticized the soda ban as having an arbitrary effect on local businesses. “It doesn’t make sense,” he said. Photo: Sandra García

Councilmember Robert Jackson, who conducted
tours in his district on the issue, criticized the
soda ban as having an arbitrary effect on local
businesses. “It doesn’t make sense,” he said.
Photo: Sandra García

“Obesity didn’t start with 16-ounce colas,” said Emily Mesler, a local resident. “It’s like putting a Band-Aid on a large, large problem.”

Mesler even spoke of alternatives to the bill, strategies that she sees as being more effective, such as “increasing education in schools about proper nutrition.”

Residents did seem to agree that obesity is a widespread problem that to be actively combated, but opinion on whether the current soda ban is helping was far from unanimous.

“I think it’s probably well-intentioned, but possibly not well thought out,” said David Hunt, who co-owns Coogan’s Restaurant with Peter Walsh and Tess O’Connor-McDade.

Councilmember Jackson agreed.

“Real alternatives to the soda ban include early and long term education that starts in schools, community partnerships with health providers, and investment in programs that promote healthy lifestyles with access to nutrition and recreational activities,” he added.

The ban will take effect in six months but is expected to meet considerable legal resistance from the soda industry.

The Coalition, for one, has pledged to continue to fight against the ban’s implementation.

“This is not the end,” said spokesperson Eliot Hoff. “We are exploring legal options and all other avenues available to us.”

Residentes responden a la aprobación de la prohibición de soda

Historia y fotos por Colby Smith

Councilmember Robert Jackson, who conducted tours in his district on the issue, criticized the soda ban as having an arbitrary effect on local businesses. “It doesn’t make sense,” he said. Photo: Sandra García

El Concejal Robert Jackson, quien hizo visitas
en su distrito respecto al problema, criticó la
prohibición de soda como teniendo un efecto
arbitrario en los comercios locales. “No hace
sentido”, dijo.
Foto: Sandra García

En una votación de 8-0-1, el Departamento de Salud de la ciudad de Nueva York votó el jueves, 13 de septiembre, para prohibir la venta de bebidas azucaradas más grandes de 16 onzas.

Las complejidades de la prohibición están lejos de ser simples, llevando a muchos a creer que la medida no hará lo suficiente para combatir la obesidad.

La prohibición sin precedentes, originalmente propuesta por el Alcalde Bloomberg en la primavera, aplica a aquellas bebidas azucaradas como bebidas energéticas y sodas, pero no aplica a bebidas alcohólicas, jugos de frutas o bebidas que contengan más de un 50% de leche.

Y las complicaciones no acaban aquí.

La prohibición solo aplica a la venta de tales bebidas en establecimientos que reciben evaluación de inspección del Departamento de Salud.

Esta categoría incluye restaurantes, vendedores ambulantes y concesiones en cines, pero no incluye a las tiendas de conveniencia o máquinas.

Esta laguna en la prohibición ha llevado a la crítica de que la medida no es lo suficientemente amplia en su esfuerzo de luchar contra el aumento en la obesidad.

“Una persona sencillamente puede comprar dos bebidas pequeñas”, dijo Melissa Katzman, quien trabaja en el vecindario de Washington Heights.

Katzman identifica una pregunta clave, especialmente para los dueños de restaurantes locales: ¿Los clientes realmente comprarían dos bebidas?

“Sería positivo con personas que compran más bebidas”, dijo Kazi Islam, quien administra Dallas BBQ en el 3956 en Broadway, en la esquina de la Calle 166.

“Pero me inclino más hacia lo negativo”, añadió Islam.

“No podemos cobrarle al cliente tanto por una bebida pequeña. El precio tiene que bajar, y nosotros sufrimos la diferencia en precio”.

Y aun si los clientes decidieran comprar más soda, ¿Dónde la comprarían?

“I think it’s probably well-intentioned but possibly not well thought out,” said David Hunt, a co-owner of Coogan’s Restaurant (shown here).

“Pienso que probablemente es bien intencionada,
pero posiblemente no bien pensada”, dijo David
Hunt, codueño del Restaurante Coogan’s
(mostrado aquí).

Josue Feliz, quien administra el McDonald’s en la Calle 170 y Broadway teme perder clientes que prefieren bebidas más grandes.

“Irán donde puedan comprar la soda”, dijo Feliz.

“La prohibición debería de ser para todas las tiendas”. En una declaración, el Concejal Robert Jackson habló del temor de perder comercios y lo que el llama la “injusticia” de la prohibición y las irregularidades en su aplicación.

“No hace sentido que a un establecimiento se le aplique la prohibición de vender estas bebidas, pero justo al lado una bodega pueda vender estas grandes bebidas azucaradas”, dijo el Concejal Jackson.

“Si el verdadero motivo es frenar el comportamiento de los consumidores entonces esta injusta política pierde el motivo”.

El Concejal Jackson también caracteriza la medida como una desagradable intrusión del gobierno en la vida privada.

“Como sociedad, nosotros tenemos la responsabilidad de educar para auto-empoderamiento y no dictarle a mentes libres adultas lo que ellos pueden o no pueden consumir”, dijo el.

Miembros de Neoyorquinos para Opciones de Bebidas, un grupo de defensa que está respaldado por la industria de bebidas, también fue rápido en denunciar la decisión.

“La solución estaba ahí desde el principio, y la junta escogida por el Alcalde siguió sus órdenes en aprobar esta discriminatoria prohibición; pero no ha sido aprobada con el apoyo de los neoyorquinos”, dijo Liz Berman, presidenta de Continental Food & Beverage, Inc., presidenta de Neoyorquinos para Opciones de Bebidas.

“Es triste que la junta quiera limitar nuestras opciones. Somos lo suficientemente listos para tomar nuestras propias decisiones acerca de que comer y de que beber”.

Además, recientes estudios han indicado que la mayoría de los neoyorquinos no aprueba la prohibición. En una encuesta citada por ‘The New York Times’, el 60 por ciento de los neoyorquinos piensan que la prohibición es una “mala idea” y la Coalición dice que más de 250,000 neoyorquinos han firmado con la Coalición.

Sin embargo, los residentes del Norte de Manhattan, parecen estar divididos en el asunto.

The Mayor’s proposal to ban the sale of large sugary drinks was passed by the City’s Department of Health this week. Photo: Robin E. Kilmer

La propuesta del Alcalde para prohibir la venta de bebidas grandes azucaradas fue aprobada por el Departamento de Salud esta semana.
Foto: Robin E. Kilmer

“Pienso que es absolutamente un paso hacia la dirección correcta”, dijo Larkin McReynolds, Asistente de Profesor del Departamento de Epidemiología de la Universidad Columbia. “Dado el aumento en la obesidad y como es ligada a la diabetes, probablemente es necesario”.

Otros residentes no estaban tan seguros.

“La obesidad no comenzó con una soda de 16 onzas”, dijo Emily Mesler, residente local. “Es como colocar una curita en una herida bien grande”.

Mesler habló incluso de alternativas a la prohibición, estrategias que ella ve como más eficaces, tales como “aumentar la educación en las escuelas acerca de una nutrición adecuada”.

Los residentes parecen coincidir en que la obesidad es un problema que se ha esparcido y que tiene que ser activamente combatido, pero la opinión de si la actual prohibición de sodas está ayudando no es unánime.

“Pienso que probablemente es bien intencionada, pero posiblemente no bien pensada”, dijo David Hunt, quien es codueño del Restaurante Coogan’s con Peter Walsh y Tess O’Connor-McDade.

El Concejal Jackson estuvo de acuerdo.

“Alternativas reales a la prohibición de sodas incluye educación temprana y a largo plazo que comienza en las escuelas, asociaciones comunales con proveedores de salud e inversiones en programas que promueven estilos de vida saludable con acceso a actividades de nutrición y recreativas”, añadió.

La prohibición estará en efecto en seis meses pero se espera que tenga considerable resistencia legal por parte de la industria de las sodas.

La Coalición, por un lado, se ha comprometido en continuar luchando contra la implementación de la prohibición.

“Este no es el final”, dijo el portavoz Eliot Hoff. “Estamos explorando opciones legales y todas las demás alternativas posibles para nosotros”.