Proposed changes could result in loss of district
Propuestos cambios en los distritos podrían resultar en pérdida de distrito

  • English
  • Español

Proposed changes could result in loss of district

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

Zead Ramadan argued that combining districts would mean losing representation for northern Manhattan.

Zead Ramadan argued that combining districts
would mean losing representation for northern
Manhattan.

The loss of a northern Manhattan Councilmember could equal a loss of funding for Inwood and Washington Heights.

That was the message delivered at an information session on the City Council redistricting process currently underway.

At the meeting held this past Wed., Sept. 19th at the K’hal Adath Jeshuran Moriah Luncheon Club, New York City Councilmember Robert Jackson and his staff outlined the changes proposed by the New York City Districting Commission.

The commission recently released a set of preliminary maps changing the shape of northern Manhattan’s City Council representation.

Currently, the area has two council districts, roughly divided along Broadway.

Councilmember Jackson of Council District 7 represents the western half of Upper Manhattan. The eastern half is District 10, represented by Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez.

The proposed map puts District 7 on the east side of Broadway and pushes its northern border south to the George Washington Bridge. District 10, which must be redrawn to gain population, would encompass all of Inwood and much of Washington Heights, essentially making Councilmember Rodríguez the sole councilmember for most of northern Manhattan. He did not attend the meeting.

It is important to remember, Johanna García said, that the maps are preliminary and will likely change based on input from citizens, community groups, elected officials and other organizations.

García, the director of Budget and Legislative Affairs for Councilmember Jackson, urged citizens to submit their own maps to the commission.

“The commission is made up of people – some of whom have never set foot in Northern Manhattan,” she said. “All they know is what we tell them.”

Cheryl Pahaham (left), a candidate for Councilmember Jackson’s seat, believes the city charter should be changed.

Cheryl Pahaham (left), a candidate for
Councilmember Jackson’s seat, believes the city
charter should be changed.

Community members present at the meeting said that the loss of a councilmember could dilute northern Manhattan’s political power.

Zead Ramadan, local businessman and volunteer with various community organizations, said a combined district means losing an extra voice in City Council.

Maria Luna, a longtime Democratic district leader, said the community should focus on uniting and making sure that the elected official brings in the necessary resources. “It is the quality of the elected official that we should be concerned about,” she said.

Councilmember Jackson said that was a valid point, but the information session was designed to inform the public of possible repercussions of redistricting. And while he originally had said that he was against any change in his district, on Wednesday evening he said his position was now “evolving.”

He said that since people from the 10th District moved across the river into the Bronx, the commission could instead include that area in the 10th District.

The New York City Charter only allows one district in Manhattan to span two boroughs. Currently District 9 represents both East Harlem and Mott Haven.

“As a result of that, the only place you can pick up is going west and going south,” Councilmember Jackson said.

Both Ramadan and Cheryl Pahaham, who is running for Councilmember Jackson’s seat, said the city charter should be changed to allow another district to cross into the Bronx.

Johanna García, the director of Budget and Legislative Affairs for Councilmember Jackson, called on residents to submit their own maps.

Johanna García, the director of Budget and
Legislative Affairs for Councilmember Jackson,
called on residents to submit their own maps.

Ramadan conceded it was unlikely the charter could be changed before the commission’s March 5th deadline.

But, he said, a citizen could sue the city and call for a stay to leave the districts as they are until the charter is changed to allow for another district to cross over into the Bronx.

“It makes sense sometimes,” Ramadan said. “Our assembly districts do that.”

Councilmember Jackson, García and Elizabeth Ritter from Sen. Adriano Espaillat’s office reiterated that the loss of representation could lead to a loss of funding for the district.

City Council allocates two pools of discretionary funding—one for expenses and another for capital projects. Capital funding is for construction of schools, hospitals and infrastructure. Expense funding generally goes to non-profit organizations such as after-school programs.

Capital funding is allocated at the discretion of City Council Speaker Christine Quinn. Distribution of expense funding is slightly different. Each councilmember receives $340,000 to distribute, with additional funding distributed at the discretion of the Speaker.

According to a report by Citizens Union, amounts distributed to each council district vary widely. District 7 pulled in a total of $25.7 million in both capital and expense funding for fiscal years 2009 through 2012. District 10 brought in $19.22 million during the same period. In comparison, District 47, led by Domenic Recchia, Jr. raked in $68.3 million. District 19, led by Daniel Halloran, received only $9.9 million.

Since Councilmember Jackson represents other areas besides Inwood and Washington Heights, not all of his funding went to northern Manhattan.

But if the area loses a councilmember, Councilmember Jackson said local groups could see a reduction in funds.

Ritter added that the situation is even more complex when organizations have constituents who cross council lines.

Elizabeth Lorris Ritter (left) from Sen. Adriano Espaillat’s office, expressed concern about a loss of funding.

Elizabeth Lorris Ritter (left) from Sen. Adriano
Espaillat’s office, expressed concern about a loss
of funding.

For example, P.S. 173 has an after-school program funded by both Councilmembers because students live in both districts. A loss of one councilmember for the area could reduce funding for these types of programs.

“There are dozens of examples like that,” she said.

García noted that along with the rest of the city, northern Manhattan is facing drastic cuts in after-school programs.

“When it comes to advocat[ing] for resources, the more voices you have at City Hall to say, ‘This is unacceptable,’ the better you are as a community to anchor and leverage your resources,” she said.

García urged community members to attend and speak at the next Districting Commission meeting on Oct. 4th at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at 135th Street and Lenox Avenue, which will begin at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, residents can call the Office of Councilmember Robert Jackson at 212.928.1322 or can also contact the NYC Redistricting Commission at 212.442.6940 or at http://www.nyc.gov/html/dc/html/home/home.shtml.

Propuestos cambios en los distritos podrían resultar en pérdida de distrito

Historia y fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

Johanna García, the director of Budget and Legislative Affairs for Councilmember Jackson, called on residents to submit their own maps.

Johanna García, directora de Presupuestos y
Asuntos Legislativos del concejal Jackson,
exhortó a los ciudadanos a someter sus propios
mapas a la comisión.

La pérdida de un miembro del Concejo Municipal del Alto Manhattan podría equivaler a la pérdida de fondos para Inwood y Washington Heights.

Ese fue el mensaje entregado en una sesión informativa del Concejo de la ciudad sobre el proceso de redistribuir los distritos actualmente en curso.

En la reunión realizada este pasado miércoles, 19 de septiembre en el K’hal Adath Jeshuran Moriah Luncheon Club, el miembro del Concejo de la ciudad de Nueva York Robert Jackson y sus empleados delinearon los cambios propuestos por la Comisión de Distritos de la ciudad de Nueva York.

Recientemente la comisión publicó un grupo de mapas preliminares cambiando la forma de la representación del Concejo de la ciudad en el Norte de Manhattan.

Actualmente el área tiene dos concejos de distrito, divididos a lo largo de Broadway.

El concejal Jackson del Concejos del Distrito 7 representa la mitad del oeste del Alto Manhattan. La mitad del este es el Distrito 10, representada por el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez.

El propuesto mapa coloca al Distrito 7 en el lado este de Broadway y empuja su frontera norte al sur del Puente George Washington. El Distrito 10, el cual debe de ser redibujado para ganar población, abarcaría todo Inwood y gran parte de Washington Heights, haciendo a Rodríguez esencialmente el único concejal para la mayoría del Norte de Manhattan.

Rodríguez no asistió a la reunión.

Es importante recordar, dijo Johanna García, que los mapas son preliminares y probablemente cambiarán basados en información de los ciudadanos, grupos comunales, oficiales electos y otras organizaciones.

García, directora de Presupuestos y Asuntos Legislativos del concejal Jackson, exhortó a los ciudadanos a someter sus propios mapas a la comisión.

“La comisión está hecha de personas – algunos de los cuales nunca han puesto un pie en el Norte de Manhattan”, dijo ella. “Todo lo que ellos saben es lo que nosotros les decimos”.

Miembros de la comunidad presentes en la reunión dijeron que la pérdida de un concejal podría diluir el poder político del Alto Manhattan.

Zead Ramadan, comerciante del área y voluntario en varias organizaciones comunales, dijo que distritos combinados significa perder una extra voz en el Concejo de la ciudad.

María Luna, una líder demócrata por mucho tiempo, dijo que la comunidad debe de enfocarse en unirse y asegurarse de que el oficial electo lleve los recursos necesarios. “Es la calidad del oficial electo lo cual nos debe de preocupar”, dijo ella.

El concejal Jackson dijo que era un punto válido, pero la sesión informativa estaba diseñada para informar al público de las posibles repercusiones de redistribuir los distritos. Y aunque originalmente había dicho que estaba contra cualquier cambio en su distrito, el miércoles en la noche dijo que su posición ahora estaba “evolucionando”.

Cheryl Pahaham (left), a candidate for Councilmember Jackson’s seat, believes the city charter should be changed.

Cheryl Pahaham, quien está postulada para el
escaño de Jackson, opino que la constitución de
la ciudad debería cambiarse para permitirle a
otro distrito cruzar hacia el Bronx.

Dijo que ya que las personas del Distrito 10 se mudaron al otro lado del río al Bronx, la comisión en su lugar podría incluir esa área en el Distrito 10.

El ‘New York City Charter’ solo permite un distrito en Manhattan para cubrir dos condados. El actual Distrito 9 representa tanto el East Harlem como a Mott Haven.

“Como resultado de eso, el único lugar donde puedes recoger es viajando al oeste y yendo hacia el sur”, dijo Jackson.

Tanto Ramadan como Cheryl Pahaham, quien está postulada para el escaño de Jackson, dijeron que la constitución de la ciudad debería cambiarse para permitirle a otro distrito cruzar hacia el Bronx.

Ramadan admitió que era poco probable que pudiesen cambiar antes de la fecha límite de la comisión el 5 de marzo.

Pero dijo que un ciudadano podría demandar a la ciudad y pedir dejar los distritos como están hasta que la constitución sea cambiada para permitirle a otro distrito cruzar sobre el Bronx. “Algunas veces hace sentido”, dijo Ramadan. “Nuestra asamblea de distritos hace eso”.

Jackson, García y Elizabeth Ritter desde la oficina del Senador Adriano Espaillat reiteraron que la pérdida de representación podría llevar a la pérdida de fondos para el distrito.

El Concejo asigna dos fondos discrecionales – uno para gastos y otro para proyectos capitales. Los fondos capitales son para la construcción de escuelas, hospitales e infraestructura. Los fondos de gastos generalmente van a organizaciones sin fines de lucro tales como programas luego del horario escolar.

Los fondos capitales son asignados a la discreción de la portavoz del concejo Christine Quinn. La distribución de los fondos para gastos es algo diferente. Cada concejal recibe $340,000 para distribuir, con fondos adicionales distribuidos a la discreción de la Portavoz.

Según un reporte de ‘Citizens Union’, la cantidad distribuida a cada concejo de distrito varía ampliamente. El Distrito 7 tiene un total de $25.7 millones en fondos capitales y de gastos para los años fiscales del 2009 hasta el 2012. El Distrito 10 trajo $19.22 millones durante el mismo periodo. En comparación, el Distrito 47 dirigido por Domenic Recchia, Jr. tuvo $68.3 millones. El Distrito 19 dirigido por Daniel Halloran, recibió solo $9.9 millones.

Ya que el concejal Jackson representa otras áreas además de Inwood y Washington Heights, no todo sus fondos fueron al Norte de Manhattan.

Pero si el área pierde un miembro en el concejo, el concejal Jackson dijo que los grupos locales podrían ver una reducción en los fondos.

Ritter añadió que la situación es aun más compleja cuando las organizaciones tienen constituyentes que cruzan las líneas de concejos.

Elizabeth Lorris Ritter (left) from Sen. Adriano Espaillat’s office, expressed concern about a loss of funding.

Elizabeth Ritter desde la oficina del Senador
Adriano Espaillat reitero que la pérdida de
representación podría llevar a la pérdida de
fondos para el distrito.

Por ejemplo, P.S. 173 tiene un programa luego del horario escolar financiado por ambos concejales porque los estudiantes viven en ambos distritos. La pérdida de un concejal para el área podría reducir los fondos para estos tipos de programas.

“Hay docenas de ejemplos como ese”, dijo ella.

García señaló que junto con el resto de la ciudad, el Norte de Manhattan está enfrentando drásticos recortes en programas luego del horario escolar.

“Cuando se trata de defender los recursos, mientras más voces tengas en la alcaldía para decir, ‘esto no es aceptable’, mejor eres como comunidad para asegurar y aprovechar tus recursos”, dijo ella.

García exhorta a los miembros de la comunidad a asistir y hablar en la próxima reunión de la Comisión de Distritos el 4 de octubre en ‘Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture’ en la Calle 135 y la Avenida Lenox, el cual comenzará a las 5:30 p.m.

Para más información, los residentes pueden llamar a la oficina del Concejal Robert Jackson al 212-928-1322 o también pueden contactar el NYC Redistricting Commission al 212.442.6940 o al http://www.nyc.gov/html/dc/html/home/home.shtml.