CCCEH Overview Video from CCCEH on Vimeo.

Primary Probes
Investigaciones primordiales

  • English
  • Español

Primary Probes

Research center focused on pollutants and pregnancy

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) was founded in 1998.

The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental
Health (CCCEH) was founded in 1998.

It has beat back BPA on the state level and contributed to the citywide ban on pesticides.

For two decades, a research center in Washington Heights has sought to protect New Yorkers from harmful pollutants that can contribute to negative health outcomes – including Bisphenol A (BPA).

The industrial chemical, often used in plastic containers used to store food and beverages, has prompted concerns due to possible health effects, especially on children and infants.

Since its founding in 1998, the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) has used a variety of methodologies to study the effects of environmental pollutants on pregnant women and children.

Part of Columbia University Medical Center’s Mailman School of Public Health, CCCEH was established when an interdisciplinary team of Columbia researchers received funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create one of eight centers nationwide devoted to studying children’s environmental health.

The effects of pollutants on pregnant women are one focus of research.

The effects of pollutants on pregnant women are
one focus of research.

CCCEH is one of only two such children’s centers to be funded continuously by EPA and NIEHS and is unique in concentrating its scope of research on pregnant women.

“Leading up to 1998, we began to understand the vulnerability of the developing fetus,” explained CCCEH Director Dr. Frederica Perera. “Contrary to what was once thought, the placenta was not perfect protection of the developing fetus. Many chemicals could travel across. We also began to understand that low-income communities and communities of color had higher levels of exposure.”

The center studies exposures to mold, lead, mercury, secondhand smoke, pesticides and other allergens that can increase New Yorkers’ risk factors for asthma, mental and physical delay, attention and behavioral disorders, chromosomal abnormalities, obesity and metabolic disorders.

Julie Herbstman, Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Co-Director of Molecular Epidemiology at CCCEH, said the center’s research has led to better health outcomes for participants.

“We can pick up developmental problems and help guide people into early intervention,” she said.

Perera said that many household items, such as plastics and flame-retardant fabrics and furniture, contain contaminants many people are unaware of.

Flame-retardant chemicals have been added to furniture and electronics since the 1970’s to comply with fire safety standards.

Manufacturers’ use of new organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRS) to consumer products, for example, has increased since 2005; a commonly used OPFR is Tris (1,3-dichlorisopropyl) phosphate also known as Tris. OPFRs have been linked to endocrine disruption, decreased fertility, and thyroid dysfunction in humans. In CCCEH studies, researchers examined exposure to Tris and six other flame retardants.

“These pollutants are showing to be significant contributors to health problems, and it’s preventable,” Perera said. “You want to tell people about the health risks, because they might not know.”

“We can help guide people into early intervention,” said Associate Professor Julie Herbstman.

“We can help guide people into
early intervention,” said Associate
Professor Julie Herbstman.

“Material hardship, and stress due to poverty, can heighten the effect,” she added.

In 1998, the Center launched a cohort study on the effects of air pollutants on pregnant women and their developing fetuses.

The study has continued to monitor the health of participating children long after birth, with the oldest children now about 20 years old. More than 80 percent of the families who began the study in 1998 are still involved, said Perera.

Study participants are provided with small backpacks equipped with air monitors. The women wear the backpacks during their daily routines and keep them next to them while sleeping or at home.

“It’s turned out to be quite a good indicator of their exposure during pregnancy,” said Perera.

In addition, CCCEH researchers visit the participants’ home to collect allergen samples from various rooms.

Among other things, the study has demonstrated that exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy increases risk of cognitive and behavioral problems in children.

Herbstman said that the center continues to recruit pregnant women for studies on how air quality in the city has changed over time.

The study has monitored the health of participating children long after birth.

The study has monitored the health of
participating children long after birth.

“With different local and national policies to reduce air pollutants since the center opened, one of the things we’re interested in is [whether] these policies have an impact on pregnant women’s exposure,” she said.

Recently, Herbstman partnered with a researcher from Oregon to use silicone bracelets that can absorb pollutants, as a way to record what people are being exposed to in their everyday lives.

Resembling a Live Strong band, they can measure 1,500 different chemicals, Herbstman said.

“We’re trying to use newer technologies that are a little less burdensome,” she said, although CCCEH continues to employ the air monitor backpacks as well.

The center partners with a variety of community-based organizations to gather participants for studies and spread word about research findings.

“It is crucial,” said Peggy Shepard, Executive Director and co-Founder of WE ACT.

“It is crucial,” said Peggy Shepard, Executive
Director and co-Founder of WE ACT.

Its Community Advisory and Stakeholders Board represents Northern Manhattan and Bronx residents and includes parents, child advocates, healthcare professionals, environmental activists and representatives from local government.

“A good number of our research staff are from the community and they live here, so they can relate very easily to study participants,” said Herbstman. “You’re talking about your neighbors and people of similar cultural backgrounds.”

She said the community partners are essential to helping to ensure that study questionnaires and other research factors are culturally competent.

Advocacy group We Act for Environmental Justice (WE ACT) is CCCEH’s lead community partner, and has collaborated with the center since its founding.

Concerns have been raised about possible health effects.

Concerns have been raised about possible health effects.

Peggy Shepard, Executive Director and co-Founder of WE ACT, remarked that the center’s location in the heart of Northern Manhattan, an area with high rates of asthma and other health issues, is essential to improving community health.

“It’s been crucial,” she said. “Not only is it important data, but it’s from the community where we live. It’s important to have that data ready, to work with world-renowned scientists and get their advice.”

Shepard said that WE ACT advocates for policy changes based on CCCEH research, and performs community education relevant to the Center’s findings.

She said the group’s advocacy helped influence state legislation passed on banning BPA, and aided in enacting the citywide ban on pesticides.

Researcher Darryl Holmes displays the air monitor backpack.

Researcher Darryl Holmes displays the air
monitor backpack.

“The campaign to get the MTA to convert every bus from diesel fuel, that was driven by findings from the center,” Shepard said.

“The ultimate goal for what we do is to drive legislation,” affirmed Perera, who has testified together with Shepard at City Council hearings, and helped lobby for policy changes in Albany and Washington, D.C.

Herbstman said the center is also working with local clinicians to make them more aware of environmental research.

“We’re developing conversations to understand what they’re telling pregnant women, and what type of questions they’re asking,” she said.

WE ACT has also partnered with CCCEH on an Environmental Health Leadership and Justice Training program, a 10-week session that instructs local residents on environmental topics and teaches them how to connect with community members regarding environmental risk factors.

“I think it’s such a beneficial partnership because there are things that the community needs to know about their environment,” Shepard said. “The center has state-of-the-art, nationally recognized research, and we help connect that to the community at large.”

Studies are conducted in low-income neighborhoods in northern Manhattan and the South Bronx that are disproportionately burdened by pollution, in addition to work executed at the World Trade Center site. The center also has conducted research in Poland and China in regions where coal burning is widespread.

“We’re able to tell people in the wider community about what they can do in their own lives to reduce exposure,” noted Perera.

 

For more information, please visit ccceh.org or call 212.304.7280.

Investigaciones primordiales

Centro de investigación enfocado en contaminantes y embarazo

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

"Comenzamos a entender la vulnerabilidad del feto en desarrollo", dijo la directora del CCCEH, la Dra. Frederica Perera.

“Comenzamos a entender la
vulnerabilidad del feto en
desarrollo”, dijo la directora del
CCCEH, la Dra. Frederica Perera.

Ha hecho retroceder al BPA a nivel estatal y ha contribuido a la prohibición de plaguicidas en toda la ciudad.

Durante dos décadas, un centro de investigación en Washington Heights ha tratado de proteger a los neoyorquinos de los contaminantes nocivos que pueden contribuir a los resultados negativos de salud, incluido el bisfenol A (BPA, por sus siglas en inglés).

El químico industrial, que a menudo se usa en contenedores de plástico utilizados para almacenar alimentos y bebidas, ha provocado inquietudes debido a posibles efectos en la salud, especialmente en niños y bebés.

Desde su fundación en 1998, el Centro para la Salud Ambiental Infantil de Columbia (CCCEH, por sus siglas en inglés) ha utilizado una variedad de metodologías para estudiar los efectos de los contaminantes ambientales en mujeres embarazadas y niños.

Parte de la Facultad Mailman de Salud Pública del Centro Médico de la Universidad Columbia, el CCCEH fue creado cuando un equipo interdisciplinario de investigadores de Columbia recibió fondos del Instituto Nacional de Ciencias de la Salud Ambiental (NIEHS, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) para crear uno de los ocho centros a nivel nacional dedicados al estudio de la salud ambiental infantil.

CCCEH es uno de los dos únicos centros infantiles de este tipo financiados continuamente por EPA y NIEHS, y es el único en la concentración de su alcance de investigación en mujeres embarazadas.

“Antes de 1998, comenzamos a comprender la vulnerabilidad del feto en desarrollo”, explicó la directora del CCCEH, Dra. Frederica Perera. “Al contrario de lo que se pensaba, la placenta no era la protección perfecta del feto en desarrollo. Muchos productos químicos podrían viajar a través de ella. También comenzamos a entender que las comunidades de bajos ingresos y las comunidades de color tenían niveles más altos de exposición”.

Shepard, vista aquí en una protesta en 1988, ha abogado durante mucho tiempo por la justicia ambiental.

Shepard, vista aquí en una protesta en 1988, ha abogado
durante mucho tiempo por la justicia ambiental.

El centro estudia la exposición al moho, plomo, mercurio, humo de segunda mano, pesticidas y otros alérgenos que pueden aumentar los factores de riesgo del asma, el retraso mental y físico, trastornos de la atención y del comportamiento, anormalidades cromosómicas, obesidad y trastornos metabólicos en los neoyorquinos.

Julie Herbstman, profesora asociada de Ciencias de la Salud Ambiental y codirectora de Epidemiología Molecular en CCCEH, dijo que la investigación del centro ha conducido a mejores resultados de salud para los participantes.

“Podemos resolver los problemas de desarrollo y ayudar a las personas en una intervención temprana”, dijo.

Perera dijo que muchos artículos para el hogar, como plásticos y telas y muebles ignífugos, contienen contaminantes que muchas personas desconocen.

El Centro para la Salud Ambiental Infantil de Columbia (CCCEH, por sus siglas en inglés) fue fundado en 1998.

El Centro para la Salud Ambiental Infantil de
Columbia (CCCEH, por sus siglas en inglés) fue
fundado en 1998.

Químicos ignífugos han sido agregado a muebles y productos electrónicos desde la década de 1970 para cumplir con las normas de seguridad contra incendios.

El uso por parte de los fabricantes de nuevos retardantes de llama organofosfatos (OPFRS, por sus siglas en inglés) para productos de consumo, por ejemplo, ha aumentado desde 2005; un OPFR comúnmente usado es Tris (1,3-diclorisopropil) fosfato también conocido como Tris. Los OPFR han sido relacionado con alteraciones endocrinas, disminución de la fertilidad y disfunción tiroidea en humanos. En estudios del CCCEH, investigadores examinaron la exposición a Tris y otros seis retardantes de llama.

“Estos contaminantes están demostrando ser contribuyentes significativos a los problemas de salud, y son prevenibles”, dijo Perera. “Quieres contarle a la gente sobre los riesgos para la salud, porque es posible que no lo sepan”.

“Las dificultades materiales y el estrés debido a la pobreza pueden aumentar el efecto”, agregó.

Los efectos de los contaminantes en mujeres embarazadas son un foco de investigación.

Los efectos de los contaminantes en mujeres
embarazadas son un foco de investigación.

En 1998, el Centro lanzó un estudio de población base sobre los efectos de los contaminantes atmosféricos en mujeres embarazadas y sus fetos en desarrollo.

El estudio ha seguido monitoreando la salud de los niños participantes mucho después del nacimiento, y los niños mayores ahora tienen alrededor de 20 años. Más del 80 por ciento de las familias que comenzaron el estudio en 1998 todavía están involucradas, dijo Perera.

Los participantes del estudio reciben pequeñas mochilas equipadas con monitores de aire. Las mujeres usan las mochilas durante sus rutinas diarias y las mantienen junto a ellas mientras duermen o en casa.

“Resultó ser un buen indicador de su exposición durante el embarazo”, dijo Perera.

Además, los investigadores de CCCEH visitan el hogar de los participantes para recolectar muestras de alérgenos de varias habitaciones.

Entre otras cosas, el estudio ha demostrado que la exposición a los contaminantes del aire durante el embarazo aumenta el riesgo de problemas cognitivos y de conducta en los niños.

Herbstman dijo que el centro continúa reclutando mujeres embarazadas para estudios sobre cómo la calidad del aire en la ciudad ha cambiado con el tiempo.

“Con diferentes políticas locales y nacionales para reducir los contaminantes del aire desde que se inauguró el centro, una de las cosas que nos interesa es [si] estas políticas tienen un impacto en la exposición de las mujeres embarazadas”, dijo.

Recientemente, Herbstman se asoció con un investigador de Oregon para usar brazaletes de silicona que pueden absorber contaminantes, como una forma de registrar a qué están expuestas las personas en sus vidas cotidianas.

Parecen una banda de Live Strong y pueden medir 1,500 sustancias químicas diferentes, dijo Herbstman.

"Podemos ayudar a guiar a las personas en una intervención temprana", dijo la profesora asociada Julie Herbstman.

“Podemos ayudar a guiar a las
personas en una intervención
temprana”, dijo la profesora
asociada Julie Herbstman.

“Estamos tratando de utilizar tecnologías más nuevas que son un poco menos pesadas”, dijo, aunque el CCCEH continúa empleando también las mochilas para monitores de aire.

El centro se asocia con una variedad de organizaciones comunitarias para reunir participantes para los estudios y difundir los hallazgos de la investigación.

Su Junta Comunitaria y de Partes Interesadas representa a los residentes del norte de Manhattan y el Bronx e incluye a padres, defensores de los niños, profesionales de la salud, activistas medioambientales y representantes del gobierno local.

“Un buen número de nuestro personal de investigación es de la comunidad y vive aquí, por lo que pueden relacionarse muy fácilmente con los participantes del estudio”, dijo Herbstman. “Estás hablando de tus vecinos y personas de orígenes culturales similares”.

Dijo que los socios de la comunidad son esenciales para ayudar a garantizar que los cuestionarios de estudio y otros factores de investigación sean culturalmente competentes.

El grupo de defensa We Act for Environmental Justice (WE ACT) es el principal socio comunitario de CCCEH, y ha colaborado con el centro desde su fundación.

Peggy Shepard, directora ejecutiva y cofundadora de WE ACT, comentó que la ubicación del centro en el corazón del norte de Manhattan, un área con altas tasas de asma y otros problemas de salud, es esencial para mejorar la salud de la comunidad.

El estudio ha monitoreado la salud de los niños participantes mucho después del nacimiento.

El estudio ha monitoreado la salud de los niños
participantes mucho después del nacimiento.

“Ha sido crucial”, dijo. “No solo es información importante, sino que proviene de la comunidad en la que vivimos. Es primordial tener listos esos datos, trabajar con científicos de renombre mundial y obtener sus consejos”.

Shepard dijo que WE ACT aboga por cambios de políticas basados en la investigación de CCCEH y lleva a cabo una educación comunitaria relevante para los hallazgos del Centro.

Explicó que el grupo de defensa ayudó a influir en la legislación estatal aprobada sobre la prohibición del BPA, y a promulgar la prohibición de plaguicidas en toda la ciudad.

“La campaña para lograr que la MTA convirtiera todos los autobuses de combustible diésel, fue impulsada por los hallazgos del centro”, dijo Shepard.

“El objetivo final de lo que hacemos es impulsar legislación”, afirmó Perera, quien ha testificado junto con Shepard en audiencias del Concejo Municipal, y ha ayudado a cabildear cambios de política en Albany y Washington, D.C.

"Es crucial", dijo Peggy Shepard, directora ejecutiva y cofundadora de WE ACT.

“Es crucial”, dijo Peggy Shepard, directora
ejecutiva y cofundadora de WE ACT.

Herbstman dijo que el centro también está trabajando con médicos locales para hacerlos más conscientes de la investigación ambiental.

“Estamos desarrollando conversaciones para entender lo que le están diciendo a las mujeres embarazadas, y qué tipo de preguntas están haciendo”, dijo.

WE ACT también se asoció con CCCEH en un programa de Capacitación en Liderazgo y Justicia en Salud Ambiental, una sesión de 10 semanas que instruye a los residentes locales sobre temas ambientales y les enseña cómo conectarse con los miembros de la comunidad con respecto a factores ambientales de riesgo.

“Creo que es una asociación muy beneficiosa porque hay cosas que la comunidad necesita saber sobre su entorno”, dijo Shepard. “El centro cuenta con una investigación de vanguardia reconocida a nivel nacional, y ayudamos a conectar eso con la comunidad en general”.

Los estudios se llevan a cabo en vecindarios de bajos ingresos en el norte de Manhattan y el sur del Bronx, que están desproporcionadamente agobiados por la contaminación, además del trabajo ejecutado en el sitio del World Trade Center. El centro también ha realizado investigaciones en Polonia y China en regiones donde la quema de carbón está generalizada.

“Podemos informar a la gente de la comunidad en general sobre lo que pueden hacer en sus propias vidas para reducir la exposición”, señaló Perera.

 

Para obtener más información, por favor visite ccceh.org o llame al 212.304.7280.