Meeting held to show support for Columbia dean
Reunión para mostrar apoyo al director de Columbia

  • English
  • Español

Meeting held to show support for Columbia dean

Story by Adrian Cabreja

Photos by Eduardo Hoepelman

Sebastian García, a Columbia engineering student, attended a meeting to show support for embattled Dean Peña-Mora. “I’m here to support him until the end,” said García.

Sebastian García, a Columbia engineering student, attended a meeting to show support for embattled Dean Peña-Mora. “I’m here to support him until the end,” said García.

Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez held an “emergency” community meeting this past Friday in response to the possible removal of Dean Feniosky Peña-Mora, who serves as the head of the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science at Columbia

Community residents gathered on Fri., June 1st at the Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Center in a show of support for Dean Peña-Mora, a Dominican immigrant who is the first person of color to hold the post at Columbia’s engineering school.

“This is a very important situation, because it is going to signify what type of relationship Columbia University has with northern Manhattan, predominately a community of color,” said Councilmember Rodríguez during the meeting.

Dr. Peña-Mora, as has been reported in the New York Times, the Columbia Spectator, and other publications, has faced internal opposition from Columbia faculty, and has had his leadership questioned since his appointment in 2009.

University administrators received a letter of “no confidence” from a majority of the engineering school’s nine department chairmen last year, and a similar letter, penned by a group of the school’s tenured professors and expressing dissatisfaction with his tenure, was sent in October 2011.

The latter called for a “quick change in leadership,” and charged that Dean Peña-Mora had worsened an existing shortage in space and had failed to engage faculty and colleagues.

Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger has, to date, rejected calls to replace Dean Peña-Mora, insisting that while “legitimate,” the faculty’s concerns are not grounds for dismissal or replacement.

“This…is going to signify what type of relationship Columbia University has with northern Manhattan,” said Councilmember Rodríguez during the meeting.

“This…is going to signify what type of relationship Columbia University has with northern Manhattan,” said Councilmember Rodríguez during the meeting.

Dean Peña-Mora, a Dominican immigrant who arrived in the States at the age of 21 speaking little English. He went on to earn graduate degrees from M.I.T., and has held a successive number of teaching and administrative posts before taking up as Dean at Columbia’s Fun Foundation School in 2009.

Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez points to Dean Peña-Mora’s accomplishments as a clear argument against his removal.

These include improving the school’s national ranking from 21st to 15th in 2012; diversifying the faculty and student body by bringing more women and minorities onto campus; and increasing support for the school’s endowment.

Some have charged that the movement to replace or dismiss Dean Peña-Mora might be racially motivated.

“We need to investigate. If it is [racially motivated], we need to see what the implications are,” said Ernesto Curiel, of the Dominican American National Roundtable, one of the meeting’s organizers.

Also in attendance were students of the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences who had come to show their support for Dr. Peña-Mora.

“Peña-Mora is very accessible to the students. He has always tried to help students grow. Because of that I’m here to support him until the end,” said Sebastian Garcia, an engineering student at Columbia.

His hiring was the third such instance at Columbia, under President Bollinger’s leadership, that a minority was placed, for the first time, in a leadership post. The other two appointments were both African American women: Claude M. Steele, as provost, and Michele M. Moody-Adams, dean of Columbia College.

Both have since moved from those positions: Steele left in June 2011 to head Stanford University’s School of Education and Moody-Adams resigned in August 2011.

Moody-Adams did so abruptly in a sharply worded e-mail just weeks before the academic year was to begin.

Attendees at the meeting listened intently to details of an action plan to help ensure Dean Peña-Mora remains at Columbia.

Attendees at the meeting listened intently to details of an action plan to help ensure Dean Peña-Mora remains at Columbia.

“I believed until very recently that, given the quality of my contributions to Columbia and the success of many of my efforts here, my concerns might be taken seriously,” wrote Moody-Adams, who spoke out against what she saw as detrimental changes to the “authority of the Dean of the College over crucial policy, fund-raising and budgetary matters.”

Moody-Adams remains at Columbia as a professor of legal theory.

Dean Peña-Mora, who spoke at Councilmember Rodríguez’s State of the District presentation in April, has not directly addressed the matter, and he was not in attendance on Friday.

In published reports to date, he has continued to pledge to work on behalf of the school and to make its work more interdisciplinary across Columbia’s various departments.

Friday’s meeting concluded with an agreed plan of action that included collecting signatures for a petition that is available at Change.org under the name “Columbia University: Stop any current effort to remove Dean Feniosky Pena Mora”.

The petition can also be picked up in Councilmember Rodríguez’s office.

Also decided by members in attendance was that there would be a protest organized – on the same day – if and when Dean Peña-Mora is dismissed.

In addition, there was a discussion about organizing a protest in the fall once the academic year has commenced to demonstrate discontent with Columbia.

“This is more than just about Peña-Mora. It is about all minorities in this community. Everyone should have the right to hold high posts if they are qualified for it,” said meeting attendee Radhames Perez.

“I believe that the issue is that Columbia University is trying to make this community “Columbia” Heights,” added Elsa Ramirez. “This is our community too!”

Reunión para mostrar apoyo al director de Columbia

Historia por Adrian Cabreja

Fotos por Eduardo Hoepelman

Attendees at the meeting listened intently to details of an action plan to help ensure Dean Peña-Mora remains at Columbia.

Asistentes a la reunión escucharon detalles de un plan de acción para asegurar que el Director Pena-Mora mantenga su puesto.

El Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez realizó una reunión comunal de “emergencia” este pasado viernes en respuesta a la posible eliminación del Director Feniosky Peña-Mora, quien sirve como director de la Fundación Fu Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas de la Universidad Columbia.

Residentes de la comunidad se reunieron el viernes, 1 de junio en el Centro Malcolm X y Dra. Betty Shabazz como muestra de apoyo al Director Peña-Mora, inmigrante dominicano quien es la primera personas de color en tener una posición en la escuela de ingeniería de Columbia.

“Esta es una situación muy importante, porque va a significar que tipo de relación la Universidad Columbia tiene con el Norte de Manhattan, predominantemente una comunidad de color”, dijo el Concejal Rodríguez durante la reunión.

El Dr. Peña-Mora, como ha sido reportado en el New York Times, el Columbia Spectator y otras publicaciones, ha enfrentado oposición interna de la facultad de Columbia y su liderazgo ha sido cuestionado desde su nombramiento en el 2009.

Administradores de la universidad recibieron una carta de “no confianza” de la mayoría de los nueve presidentes de departamento de la escuela de ingeniería el año pasado, y una carta similar, escrita por un grupo de profesores expresando su insatisfacción con el decano, enviada en octubre del 2011.

La carta pedía un “rápido cambio en liderazgo”, y acusado que el Director Peña-Mora había empeorado una existente escasez de espacio y había fallado en unir facultad y colegas.

El presidente de Columbia, Lee C. Bollinger, hasta ahora, ha rechazado las llamadas para reemplazar al Director Peña-Mora, insistiendo que aunque “legítimo”, las preocupaciones de la facultad no sirven de base para despido o reemplazo.

El presidente Peña-Mora, inmigrante dominicano quien llegó a los Estados a la edad de 21 hablando poco inglés, es graduado de M.I.T. y ha tenido un sin número de puestos en enseñanza y administración antes de tomar el puesto de director en la Fundación Fu de Columbia en el 2009.

Sebastian García, a Columbia engineering student, attended a meeting to show support for embattled Dean Peña-Mora. “I’m here to support him until the end,” said García.

Sebastian García, estudiante de ingeniería en Columbia, asistió a la reunión. “Estoy aquí para apoyar [Director Feniosky Peña-Mora] hasta el final,” dijo García.

El Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez señaló los logros del Director Peña-Mora como un claro argumento de que se quede en su puesto.

Estos incluyen el mover la escuela de la posición 21 a nivel nacional a un 15 en el 2012; diversificación de la facultad y cuerpo estudiantil aceptando más mujeres y minorías al recinto; y aumentando el apoyo para el dote de la escuela.

Algunos han dicho que el movimiento para reemplazar o eliminar a Peña-Mora podría ser racialmente motivado.

“Necesitamos investigar.

Si es racialmente motivado, tenemos que ver cuales son las implicaciones”, dijo Ernesto Curiel, de la Mesa Redonda Nacional Dominico Americana, uno de los organizadores de la reunión.

También asistieron estudiantes de la Fundación Fu Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas quienes fueron a mostrar su apoyo por el Dr. Peña-Mora.

“Peña-Mora es bien accesible a los estudiantes.

Siempre ha tratado de ayudar a que los estudiantes crezcan. Debido a eso estoy aquí para apoyarlo hasta el final”, dijo Sebastian García, estudiante de ingeniería en Columbia.

Su nombramiento fue el tercero en Columbia, bajo el liderazgo del Presidente Bollinger, donde se empleo a una minoría, por primera vez, en un puesto de liderazgo.

Los otros dos nombramientos fueron mujeres afroamericanas: Claude M. Steele, como rectora y Michele M. Moody-Adams, directora del Colegio Columbia.

Ambas han sido movidas de esas posiciones: Steele se fue en junio del 2011 para la Escuela de Educación de la Universidad Stanford y Moody-Adams renunció en agosto del 2011.

Moody-Adams lo hizo abruptamente en un correo electrónico con palabras cortantes justo a semanas de que comenzara el año académico.

“Pienso que hasta bien reciente, dado la calidad de mis contribuciones a Columbia y el éxito de muchos de mis esfuerzos aquí, mis preocupaciones deberían de ser tomadas con seriedad”, escribió Moody-Adam, quien habló contra lo que ella percibía como cambios perjudiciales a la “autoridad del Director del Colegio sobre cruciales políticas, recaudaciones y asuntos presupuestarios”.

Moody-Adams permanece en Columbia como profesora de teoría legal.

El presidente Peña-Mora, quien habló en la presentación del Estado del Distrito en abril, no ha abordado el asunto directamente y no asistió el viernes.

En reportes publicados hasta ahora, el ha continuado trabajando con la escuela y más interdisciplinariamente en Columbia.

La reunión del viernes terminó con un plan de acción que incluye recoger firmas para una petición que está disponible en Change.org bajo el nombre ‘Columbia University: Detenga cualquier actual esfuerzo para remover al director Peña-Mora

La petición también puede ser recogida en la oficina del Concejal Rodríguez.

“This…is going to signify what type of relationship Columbia University has with northern Manhattan,” said Councilmember Rodríguez during the meeting.

“Esto…va a significar que tipo de relación la Universidad Columbia tiene con el norte de Manhattan”, dijo el Concejal Rodríguez durante la reunión.

Todas las firmas son para ser presentadas al Presidente Bollinger.

También los miembros en asistencia decidieron que iba haber una protesta organizada – el mismo – si y cuando el director Peña-Mora es despedido.

Además, hubo una discusión acerca de organizar una protesta en el otoño una vez que el año académico haya comenzado para demostrar el descontento de la comunidad con Columbia en este asunto.

“Esto es mucho más que acerca de Peña-Mora. Es acerca de todas las minorías en esta comunidad. Todo el mundo tiene que tener el derecho a altos cargos si están cualificados para ello”, dijo Radhames Pérez asistente de la reunión.

“Yo pienso que el asunto es que la Universidad Columbia está tratando de hacer esta comunidad un “Columbia Heights”, añadió Elsa Ramírez. “Esta también es nuestra comunidad”.