LocalNews

“Matter of pure justice”
“Cuestión de justicia pura”

“Matter of pure justice”

Calling for full minimum wage for all

Story by Monica Barnkow and Debralee Santos

Photos by Monica Barnkow


Los defensores pidieron al Gobernador promulgar una orden administrativa salarial.
Advocates called on the Governor to enact an administrative wage order.

They want it their way.

Scores of protestors, many of them workers who receive tips who work within the food delivery, gathered outside Domino’s Pizza uptown this past Thurs., Jul. 10th. They called on Governor Andrew Cuomo to enact an administrative “Wage Order” that would mandate an end to New York’s tipped sub-minimum wage. The workers and their supporters are demanding that their employers instead pay the state’s full minimum wage, which is scheduled to rise to $9 per hour by December 31st of 2015, in addition to tips received.

By contrast, the minimum wage for tipped food service workers remains at $5.00 per hour, though tipped hotel workers earn slightly higher at $5.65 per hour.

The crowd’s chants – in English and Spanish – rang out in the sultry morning air.

“¡Sí se puede!”

“The people united will never be defeated!”

“Yes, we can!”

It is estimated that over two hundred thousand workers, many of whom are women, receive sub-minimum wage and tips in New York State. Workers that rely on tips to augment their wages argue that the inconsistent income makes for a lesser quality of life as they struggle to make ends meet. Moreover, they allege that they face wage theft by employers.

As part of last year’s minimum wage increase, the Cuomo administration is now readying to appoint a Wage Board, which will be charged with recommending an increase in New York State’s tipped sub-minimum wage.

In response, workers, labor organizations and advocates have organized to urge for action.

Los manifestantes pidieron salario mínimo completo para los trabajadores que reciben propinas.
Protestors called for full minimum wage for tipped workers.

Among those present on Thursday were city-wide representatives from the Make the Road New York; the Center for Popular Democracy; Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC-NY); Fast Food Forward; Labor-Religion Coalition; National Employment Law Project (NELP), and New York Communities for Change (NYCC).

Alan Williams, a resident of Harlem, explained that he had sought to bring the message to the Governor directly and had participated recently in a similar rally in Albany.

“It’s an absolute shame that [Cuomo] expects people from New York City to survive with anything less than the minimum wage,” he said. “The idea of paying bills and supporting a family on five dollars an hour is ludicrous.”

Others were similarly committed to getting through to legislators.

“I have always been politically active,” explained Flavio, a member of ROC-NY, who works at a restaurant in the Flatiron District and is paid five dollars per hour.

“These protests are very important to express the demands of the working class, who makes less than twenty or twenty five thousand dollars a year.”

Among the advocates were several NELP members, including Sarah Leberstein, who has been an attorney with the organization for the past seven years. She said they have sought to develop new policy models to help workers.

“We certainly hope that he is going to do the right thing,” she said. “It’s beyond time for low-wage workers to get their fair share and New Yorkers should be the leaders in developing policies that safeguard workers’ rights.”

"Los neoyorquinos deben ser los líderes en el desarrollo de políticas que protejan los derechos de los trabajadores", dijo Sarah Leberstein.
“New Yorkers should be the leaders in developing policies that safeguard workers’ rights,” said Sarah Leberstein.

Leberstein was joined by her NELP colleague Paul Sonn, who serves as the organization’s Legal Co-Director. He noted that New York allows its chief executive to issue a wage order directly, independent of any action from the legislature.

“This is a matter of pure justice,” argued Sonn. “Governor Cuomo has the power to solve this on his own.”

Some states, such as California, Washington and Oregon, already require companies to pay full minimum wage to tipped workers.

“There is no good reason not to pay workers full minimum wage,” said Sonn. “In theory, restaurants are supposed to make up the difference if workers don’t get enough tips, but the nation’s top wage enforcer, the U.S. Department of Labor, says that that system doesn’t work. It is broken and we need to raise tipped workers’ minimum wage.”

In response to inquiries from The Manhattan Times, Department of Labor’s Assistant Director of Communications Brian M. Keegan confirmed that tipped workers should be paid based on the new minimum wage, which has increased to $8.00 per hour on Dec. 31, 2013.

“Tipped workers’ wages and tips must equal or exceed that $8.00 hourly amount,” he wrote.

Regarding the selection of members of the board and an expected timeline for the process, Keegan added, “The board [will be] made up of at least three members with equal representation from labor, businesses and the public. [It] will make a recommendation to the commissioner, who will then make a final determination, which is expected in February 2015.”

"Estoy ganando $3.40 dólares por hora", dijo el trabajador de entregas de Domino's, José Sánchez.
“I am making $3.40 per hour,” said Domino’s delivery worker José Sánchez.

Beyond “in the near future,” no date was specifically given for a convening for the board, and no details were provided as to whether public input would be scheduled.

The West 181st site was a familiar one for some advocates.

In December 2013, the Domino’s restaurant was where workers and elected officials rallied as part of a “National Day of Action,” calling for better wages and job protections.

As Thursday’s rally began to wind down, Domino’s Pizza delivery worker José Sánchez stepped up to speak.

“I am currently making $3.40 per hour,” he said. “I work for a company with a yearly profit that exceeds $100,000. The current minimum wage is not enough to survive in this city.”

“Cuestión de justicia pura”

Pidiendo salario mínimo completo para todos

Historia por Mónica Barnkow y Debralee Santos

Fotos por Mónica Barnkow


Los manifestantes pidieron salario mínimo completo para los trabajadores que reciben propinas.
Los manifestantes pidieron salario mínimo completo para los trabajadores que reciben propinas.

Lo quieren a su manera.

Veintenas de manifestantes, muchos de ellos trabajadores que reciben propinas y trabajan entregando alimentos, se reunieron afuera de Domino’s Pizza en el oeste de la calle 181, el pasado jueves 10 de julio. Pidieron al gobernador Andrew Cuomo promulgar un “decreto sobre el salario” administrativo, que obligaría a terminar con el salario por debajo del mínimo de los trabajadores que reciben propina de Nueva York. Los trabajadores y sus partidarios están exigiendo que sus empleadores les paguen el salario mínimo completo del estado, que está previsto que aumente a $9 dólares por hora el 31 de diciembre 2015, además de las propinas recibidas.

Por el contrario, el salario mínimo para los trabajadores de servicio de alimentos que reciben propinas se mantiene hoy en $5.00 dólares por hora, aunque los trabajadores de hoteles que reciben propinas ganan un poco más, $5.65 por hora.

Los cantos de la multitud -en inglés y español- resonaron en el aire sofocante mañanero.

“¡Sí se puede!”.

“¡El pueblo, unido, jamás será vencido!”.

“¡Sí podemos!”.

Se estima que son más de doscientos mil trabajadores, muchos de los cuales son mujeres, los que reciben salarios por debajo del mínimo y propinas en el estado de Nueva York. Los trabajadores que dependen de las propinas para aumentar sus salarios argumentan que los ingresos inconsistentes provocan una menor calidad de vida mientras luchan por llegar a fin de mes. Por otra parte, señalan que enfrentan robo de salarios por parte de los empleadores.

Algunos estados ya requieren a las empresas pagar el salario mínimo completo a los trabajadores que reciben propinas.
Some states already require companies to pay full minimum wage to tipped workers.

Como parte del aumento del salario mínimo del año pasado, la administración Cuomo está preparando nombrar un Consejo de Salarios, el cual se encargará de recomendar un aumento en el salario para los trabajadores que reciben un sueldo por debajo del mínimo, y propinas, en el estado de Nueva York.

En respuesta, los trabajadores, las organizaciones laborales y los defensores se han organizado para exhortar a la acción.

Entre los asistentes del jueves se encontraban representantes de: Make the Road New York; Center for Popular Democracy; Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC-NY); Fast Food Forward; Labor-Religion Coalition; National Employment Law Project (NELP) y New York Communities for Change (NYCC).

Alan Williams, un residente de Harlem, explicó que intentó llevar el mensaje directamente al gobernador y que participó recientemente en una manifestación similar en Albany.

"Es una vergüenza absoluta", dijo Alan Williams.
“Es una vergüenza absoluta”, dijo Alan Williams.

“Es una vergüenza absoluta que [Cuomo] espere que la gente de la ciudad de Nueva York sobreviva con nada menos que el salario mínimo”, dijo. “La idea de pagar las cuentas y mantener a una familia con cinco dólares por hora, es ridículo”.

Otros se comprometieron de manera similar a comunicarse con los legisladores.

“Yo siempre he sido políticamente activo”, explica Flavio, miembro de ROC-NY, quien trabaja en un restaurante en el distrito Flatiron y recibe cinco dólares por hora.

“Estas protestas son muy importantes para expresar las demandas de la clase trabajadora, que recibe menos de veinte o veinticinco mil dólares al año”.

Entre los defensores estaban varios miembros de NELP, incluyendo a Sarah Leberstein, quien ha sido abogada de la organización durante los últimos siete años. Ella dijo que han tratado de desarrollar nuevos modelos de política para ayudar a los trabajadores que luchan por una mejor protección en el trabajo y un salario mínimo más alto.

"Los neoyorquinos deben ser los líderes en el desarrollo de políticas que protejan los derechos de los trabajadores", dijo Sarah Leberstein.
“Los neoyorquinos deben ser los líderes en el desarrollo de políticas que protejan los derechos de los trabajadores”, dijo Sarah Leberstein.

“Por cierto, esperamos que él haga lo correcto”, dijo. “Ya pasó la hora de los trabajadores de bajos salarios, especialmente para que obtengan su parte justa. Los neoyorquinos deben ser los líderes en el desarrollo de políticas que protejan los derechos de los trabajadores”.

Leberstein estuvo acompañada por su colega Paul Sonn, de NELP, quien se desempeña como co-director legal de la organización. Señaló que Nueva York permite a su presidente emitir una orden de salario directamente, independientemente de cualquier acción del legislativo.

“Esta es una cuestión de justicia pura”, argumentó Sonn. “El gobernador Cuomo tiene el poder de resolver esto por sí mismo”.

Algunos estados, como California, Washington y Oregon, ya exigen a las empresas pagar salarios mínimos completos a los trabajadores que reciben propinas.

“No hay una buena razón para no pagar a los trabajadores un salario mínimo completo”, dijo Sonn. “En teoría, los restaurantes deben compensar la diferencia si los trabajadores no obtienen suficientes propinas, pero el guardián de salarios más importante del país, el Departamento de Trabajo de Estados Unidos, dice que ese sistema no funciona. Necesitamos aumentar el salario mínimo de los trabajadores que reciben propinas”.

En respuesta a las preguntas del The Manhattan Times, el subdirector de Comunicaciones del Departamento del Trabajo, Brian M. Keegan, confirmó que el salario de los trabajadores que reciben propinas debe pagarse con base en el nuevo salario mínimo, que aumentó a $8.00 dólares por hora el 31 de diciembre de 2013.

Algunos estados ya requieren a las empresas pagar el salario mínimo completo a los trabajadores que reciben propinas.
Algunos estados ya requieren a las empresas pagar el salario mínimo completo a los trabajadores que reciben propinas.

“El salario y las propinas de los trabajadores que reciben propinas deben ser igual o mayor al monto de $8.00 dólares por hora”, escribió en una declaración por correo electrónico.

En cuanto a la selección de los miembros del consejo y de la expectativa de un programa, Keegan añadió: “El consejo [estará] compuesto por al menos tres miembros con igual representación de trabajadores, empresas y el público. [Este] hará una recomendación al Comisionado, quien tomará una decisión final, que se espera en febrero de 2015”.

“La fecha para la convocatoria del Concejo se establecerá en un futuro próximo”.

El lugar de la 181 oeste era conocido para algunos defensores.

En diciembre de 2013, el restaurante Domino’s fue el escenario de las protestas de los trabajadores y funcionarios electos como parte de un “Día Nacional de Acción” que demandó mejores salarios y protección laboral para los trabajadores.

A medida que la manifestación del jueves comenzó a disminuir, trabajador de entrega de Domino’s José Sánchez se acercó a hablar.

“Actualmente estoy ganando $3.40 dólares por hora”, dijo. “Yo trabajo para una empresa con una ganancia anual que supera los $100,000. El salario mínimo actual no es suficiente para sobrevivir en esta ciudad”.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker