LocalNewsPolitics/Government

Making waves to improve the wage

Haciendo movimientos para mejorar el salario

Making waves to improve the wage

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


Hundreds gathered to call for a raise in the New York State minimum wage.
Hundreds gathered to call for a raise in the New York State minimum wage.

“Stand up, fight back!”

“We’ve been used, abused!”

These chants resonated along Riverside Drive in Manhattan on the evening of Thurs., May 7th, as hundreds of low-wage workers gathered at Sakura Park to call upon lawmakers to raise the minimum wage for New York State above the current $8 per hour.

Fast food, airport and other low-wage employees assembled at the park to demand legislation in Albany that would allow individual cities in the state to set their own minimum wage.

Joined by clergy, members of community groups such as UnitedNY, New York Communities for Change and Make the Road New York and elected officials, the group then marched to nearby Riverside Church in Northern Manhattan for an interfaith service.

According to organizers, New York has the worst income inequality in the nation, largely because the state’s $8 minimum wage is too low.

Recent polls show 73% of New Yorkers support the measure.

"The time is now,” said Assemblymember Gabriela Rosa.
“The time is now,” said Assemblymember Gabriela Rosa.

Attendees, which included Northern Manhattan and Bronx residents, expressed hope that the rally would get the attention of lawmakers.

“It’s very important to me and my fellow ‘carwasheros’ that we raise the minimum wage in New York City,” said Ernesto Salazaar, who works at Webster Car Wash in the Bronx. “It is very difficult for us to pay all of our bills on such a small salary. As immigrants we contribute to this economy, and we deserve to be able to support our families and give our children better opportunities.”

Representatives from labor also pledged support.

“Raising wages for working people in New York City is an economic and moral issue,” said Vincent Alvarez, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, in a statement “As a just society, we cannot continue to allow New York City’s workers to be undervalued, while the wealthiest in society continue to get rich on the backs of everyday working men and women.”

“It’s difficult to survive in New York City on minimum wage,” said Franklin La Paz, a McDonald’s employee in Manhattan. “We need to let the politicians know how important this issue is.”

The group assembled in Riverside Church for an interfaith service.
The group assembled in Riverside Church for an interfaith service.

“We’re only making minimum wage as it is, and on top of that they cut my hours,” said McDonald’s worker Mary López. “It’s hard to support my family.”

A large group of clergy members from various religious backgrounds marched side by side with workers at the rally.

Rev. Paul H. Sherry of Riverside Church said it is no surprise that clergy have aligned themselves with the cause.

“Faith-based people have been at the forefront of social issues for decades,” said Rev. Sherry. “When you consider the demands of the Gospel, there’s no way we can sit back and not get involved.”

Riverside Church has been a nave for social justice issues in the past — in 1967, it was the site of Martin Luther King’s famous “Beyond Vietnam” anti-war speech.

For many, earning a low wage means a life riddled with difficult choices.

Naquasia LeGrand, a Kentucky Fried Chicken employee who has helped organize strikes by fast food workers, remarked, “I have to decide, ‘Do I buy a Metrocard today, or get food?'”

“There's no way we can sit back and not get involved,” said Rev. Paul H. Sherry.
“There’s no way we can sit back and not get involved,” said Rev. Paul H. Sherry.

Airport worker Shareeka Simon agreed that it is tough to live on minimum-wage pay.

“But I have a six-year-old and a five-year-old at home and will do what it takes to support them,” she said.

Some people traveled a great distance to join the rally.

Taylor McLoon, a fast food restaurant worker from New Zealand, journeyed to the United States to show support for her American counterparts, and participate in a Global Day of Action against the fast food industry, planned for May 15.

“Eight dollars an hour is just ridiculous, especially with the cost of living here,” she remarked. McLoon said that the minimum wage in her country is a more-livable $14.25.

“We also have a union for fast food workers, so we’ve proven that better conditions can exist,” added McLoon. “American fast food workers are oppressed by their corporations, and it’s all in the name of profits.”

Assemblymember Gabriela Rosa of Washington Heights and Inwood said that gender inequality is another problem facing workers in the state, as women in the workforce are typically paid less than men.

Taylor McLoon a fast food restaurant worker from New Zealand, attended.
Taylor McLoon a fast food restaurant worker from New Zealand, attended.

“Gender should not be a factor,” commented Assemblymember Rosa. “Regardless of whether you’re male or female, you should be paid the same based on the job you do.”

A study showed that women working full-time in New York were paid only 83 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts, and for black and Hispanic women, the disparity is even greater.

“We have to keep pushing for legislation to correct this,” said Assemblymember Rosa. “The time is now.”

The two-hour church service after the march featured prayer, music, testimonials from workers and calls from priests, ministers, rabbis and imams for passage of legislation that would let cities and counties around the state set their own local minimum wage and for a higher federal minimum wage

City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito spoke to the crowd and decried the hardships created by low wages for New Yorkers.

“Within the boundaries of this city, we have the greatest income disparity in the nation, with more than three million people living in poverty,” she said.

Councilmember Mark-Viverito pledged to help fight for changes in wage laws.

“As Speaker of the City Council, I am committed to this cause,” she told workers.

“We will make change happen.”

Haciendo movimientos para mejorar el salario

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen


" Vamos a hacer una realidad el cambio”, dijo la portavoz del Concejo, Melissa Mark-Viverito.
” Vamos a hacer una realidad el cambio”, dijo la portavoz del Concejo, Melissa Mark-Viverito.

“Levántate, lucha”.

“Hemos sido utilizados, abusados”.

Estos cánticos resonaban a lo largo de Riverside Drive en Manhattan la noche del jueves, 7 de mayo, mientras cientos de trabajadores con salario mínimo se reunían en el Parque Sakura para hacer un llamado a los legisladores para que aumenten el salario mínimo en el estado de Nueva York por encima del actual de $8 por hora. Empleados de tiendas de alimentos rápidos, aeropuerto y otros con salario mínimo se reunieron el parque para demandar legislación en Albany que permitiría a cada ciudad en el estado establecer su propio salario mínimo.

Acompañados por el clero, miembros de la comunidad y oficiales electos, el grupo marchó a la cercana Iglesia Riverside para un servicio ecuménico.

Los asistentes esperan que la manifestación atraiga la atención de los legisladores.

“Es difícil sobrevivir en la ciudad de Nueva York con un salario mínimo”, dijo Franklin La Paz, empleado de un McDonald en Manhattan.

“Necesitamos dejarle saber a los políticos cuan importante es este asunto”, añadió.

Taylor McLoon, de Nueva Zelandia, es una empleada de una cadena de comida rápida, y asistió con amistades.
Taylor McLoon, de Nueva Zelandia, es una empleada de una cadena de comida rápida, y asistió con amistades.

“Solo nos pagan el salario mínimo, y en encima de eso me cortan las horas”, dijo Mary López empleada de McDonald. “Es difícil sostener a mi familia”.

Un gran grupo de miembros del clero de diversos orígenes religiosos marcharon al lado de los empleados en la manifestación.

El Reverendo Paul H. Sherry de la Iglesia Riverside dijo que no es sorpresa que el clero se alineara con la causa.
“Personas con fe han estado a la vanguardia de problemas sociales por décadas”, dijo Sherry. “Cuando consideras las demandas del evangelio, no hay manera de sentarnos y no envolvernos”.

La Iglesia Riverside ha sido una nave para asuntos de justicia social en el pasado – en el 1967, fue el lugar del famoso discurso anti-guerra “Más allá de Vietnam” de Martin Luther King.

Para muchos, el ganar el salario mínimo significa una vida plagada de decisiones difíciles.

“No hay manera de sentarnos y no envolvernos”, dijo El Reverendo Paul H. Sherry de la Iglesia Riverside.
“No hay manera de sentarnos y no envolvernos”, dijo El Reverendo Paul H. Sherry de la Iglesia Riverside.

Naquasia Legrand, empleada de Kentucky Fried Chicken quien ha ayudado a organizar huelgas de empleados de cadenas de alimentos rápidos, comentó, “tengo que decidir, ‘¿compro una tarjeta de Metrocard hoy, o compro comida’?”

Shareeka Simon, empleada del aeropuerto, estuvo de acuerdo que es difícil vivir con un salario mínimo. “Pero tengo uno de seis años y uno de cinco en casa y haré lo que sea necesario para mantenerlos”, dijo.
Algunas personas viajaron una gran distancia para unirse a la manifestación.

Taylor McLoon, de Nueva Zelandia, es una empleada de una cadena de comida rápida. Ella viajó a los Estados Unidos para mostrar apoyo a sus compañeros americanos, y participar en un Día Global de Acción contra la industria de comida rápida, planificada para el 15 de mayo.

“Ocho dólares la hora es sencillamente ridículo, especialmente con el costo de vida aquí”, comentó. McLoon dijo que el salario mínimo en su país es más viable, $14.25. “También tenemos una unión para empleados de cadenas de comida rápida, así es que hemos demostrado que pueden existir mejores condiciones”, añadió Mc Loon. “Los empleados americanos de cadenas de comida rápida son oprimidos por sus corporaciones, y es todo en nombre de las ganancias”.

El grupo fue a la Iglesia Riverside para un servicio ecuménico.
El grupo fue a la Iglesia Riverside para un servicio ecuménico.

La Asambleísta Gabriela Rosa de Washington Heights e Inwood dijo que la desigualdad de género también es otro problema que enfrentan los empleados en el estado, ya que las mujeres en la fuerza laboral típicamente se les paga menos que al hombre.

“El genero no debería ser un factor”, comentó la Asambleísta Rosa. “Independientemente si eres hombre o mujer, se le debe pagar lo mismo basado en el trabajo que hace”. Un estudio mostró que las mujeres trabajando a tiempo completo en Nueva York se les pagaba solo 83 centavos por cada dólar pagado a sus homólogos masculinos, y para la mujer negra e hispana, la desigualdad es aun mayor.

“Tenemos que seguir empujando para que la legislación corrija esto”, dijo la Asambleísta Rosa.

“El momento es ahora”.

En el servicio en la iglesia, la portavoz del Concejo, Melissa Mark-Viverito habló a la multitud y censuró las dificultades creadas por los bajos salarios para los neoyorquinos.

“Dentro de los límites de esta ciudad, tenemos la mayor desigualdad de ingresos en la nación, con más de tres millones de personas vivienda en la pobreza”, dijo.

La Concejal Mark-Viverito se comprometió a luchar por cambios en las leyes salariales.

“Como portavoz del Concejo, estoy comprometida con esta causa”, les dijo a los empleados. “Vamos a hacer una realidad el cambio”.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker