Losing sunshine in the Heights?
¿Perdiendo luz solar en el Alto?

  • English
  • Español

Losing sunshine in the Heights?

The Quadriad project and rezoning hot topics at CB12’s Land Use meeting

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

James Lee, owner of Buddha Beer Bar, disbelieved the Quadriad project would be developed.

James Lee, owner of Buddha Beer Bar, disbelieved
the Quadriad project would be developed.

Rita, a resident of Washington Heights for 62 years, is afraid of losing her sunshine.

Rita enjoys the view from her window of her apartment on Overlook Terrace.

Quadriad Realty’s plan for three high rises, topping at 31 stories, on 190th and Broadway would effectively steal Rita’s sunshine and change the skyline of Northern Manhattan.

“That high of a building doesn’t belong here. It would be terrible,” she said one recent afternoon while out for a walk in nearby Fort Tryon Park.

Rita fears high density towers will also bring excessive traffic to the area.

“I have seen the ups and downs. Right now, things are looking up. Let’s leave it this way,” she added.
During a July 11th meeting with the Land Use committee of Community Board 12, Quadriad Realty said that it would revise its proposal before sending it to the Department of City Planning (DCP), and submit new applications for land use development and an environmental impact survey.

But no new application had yet been submitted to the Land Use committee in time for their first meeting of the fiscal year this past Wed., Sept. 5th.

“That high of a building doesn’t belong here. It would be terrible,” said Rita.

“That high of a building doesn’t belong
here. It would be terrible,” said Rita.

And Rita was not alone in expressing her concerns.

That evening, residents near 190th and Broadway readily proffered their own opinions and speculations regarding Quadriad’s land use and environmental impact.

A local business owner, who wished to have his name withheld for fear of retribution, spoke about a project that was proposed several years ago that was shot down due to ground instability, and wondered if that might still be a concern.

He is also worried about increased traffic.

“If the city accepts [this], they will not have considered people’s safety and concerns,” he said.

He also said his customers have mostly provided negative feedback about the project.

Linda García is director of a cultural center that currently stands right where Quadriad is planning to place its towers.

García is afraid of losing the center, which has been there for eight years and serves 85 children.

“They claim they would provide us with space, but I don’t believe any of that,” she said.

Residents gathered around a proposed rezoning map that would create height limits to maintain structural continuity.

Residents gathered around a proposed rezoning
map that would create height limits to maintain
structural continuity.

She also said she believed the towers will face issues with adequate water pressure.

“We have a subway system here and there’s always water problems,” she said.

“To me, 30 stories is ridiculous. This is such a hilly area.”

James Lee, owner of Buddha Beer Bar on 191st and Broadway, said he did not believe the project would come to fruition since Quadriad doesn’t own the land it plans to develop.

But he said he was not surprised that developers are eyeing Washington Heights and Inwood.

“Honestly, I think it’s good for the neighborhood, as long as it incorporates affordable housing.

This is New York City. You can’t help but to have development,” he said.

Plans might be underway, however, to ensure that high rises aren’t a standard of development in northern Manhattan.

The Quadriad tower would abut Gorman Park and drastically transform it.

The Quadriad tower would abut Gorman Park
and drastically transform it.

Land Use Chair Wayne Benjamin invited Edwin Marshall of the DCP to show community and board members maps of proposed rezoning in District 9.

Marshall explained that the Manhattanville Project proposal in 2007 gave CB 9 “the kick in the pants” to complete long-awaited rezoning plans.

And Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer has cited rezoning as a solution that would help downsize future building projects.

“The overarching goal of the zoning was to preserve neighborhood character,” said Marshall.

The proposed rezoning encompasses 90 blocks of District 9, from 125th to 155th Streets, between Riverside on the West to Edgecombe, Bradhurst, and Convent on the East.

The current zoning has been unchanged since 1961 and has no height limits that would maintain structural continuity.

At CB12’s land use committee meeting Edwin Marshall explains how rezoning could help preserve an area’s architectural character.

At CB12’s land use committee
meeting Edwin Marshall
explains how rezoning could
help preserve an area’s
architectural character.

Meanwhile, the new proposed rezoning curbs rampant development with height limits that are in sync with the area’s existing structures.

Limits of four stories were imposed in blocks consisting of brownstones, while some blocks will cap at 12 stories.

The plan has already designated certain areas, such as P.S. 189, to be used as sites for future affordable housing projects.

Board members and community members listened intently as Marshall explained the rezoning, which many endorsed as a worthwhile endeavor, especially in the face of the Quadriad development.

“I’m really grateful he came,” said Gail Addiss, who is a critic of the Quadriad project.

“It’s a complicated process that very few people are interested in that has major impact our community.”

For more information on District 9’s proposed rezoning map, visit http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/west_harlem/index.shtml

¿Perdiendo luz solar en el Alto?

El proyecto Quadriad y la rezonificación fueron temas candentes en la reunión de CB12 sobre Uso de laTierra

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

At CB12’s land use committee meeting Edwin Marshall explains how rezoning could help preserve an area’s architectural character.

En la reunión del comité de uso
del suelo de CB12, Edwin
Marshall explica cómo la
rezonificación podría ayudar a
preservar el carácter
arquitectónico de un área.

Rita, residente en Washington Heights por 62 años, esta temerosa de perder su luz solar.

Rita disfruta la vista desde la ventana de su apartamento en Overlook Terrace.

Efectivamente, el plan de Quadriad Realty para tres torres, con más de 31 pisos en la 190 y Broadway, robaría a Rita de su luz del sol y cambiaría efectivamente el horizonte del norte de Manhattan.

“Ese edificio alto no pertenece aquí. Sería terrible”, dijo ella una tarde reciente, mientras caminaba por el parque Fort Tryon.

“He visto los altibajos.  Ahora mismo, las cosas se ven bien. Dejémoslo así”, agregó.

En el transcurso de una reunión el 11 de julio del Comité de Uso de Tierras de la Junta Comunal #12, Quadriad Realty dijo que revisaría su propuesta antes deenviarla al DCP (Departamento de Planificación de la Ciudad, por sus siglas en ingles), y sometería unanueva aplicación para una inspección del proyecto para el uso del terreno y elimpacto ambiental.

Pero hasta este miércoles 5 deseptiembre, no había sido sometida aplicación alguna al Comité parasu primera reunión del año fiscal.

Y Rita no estaba sola cuando expresabasus inquietudes.

Esa noche, los residentes cercanos ala calle 190 y Broadway ya expresaban sus propias opiniones y especulacionescon relación al uso del terreno y el impacto ambiental por parte de Quadriad.

The Quadriad tower would abut Gorman Park and drastically transform it.

La torre Quadriad estaría cerca de Gorman Park
y la transformará drásticamente.

Y un dueño de  negocio local, quienprefirió no dar su nombre por temor a retaliación, habló sobre un proyectoque fue propuesto hace unos años y que fue cancelado debido a la inestabilidaddel terreno, y se preguntaba si eso será una preocupación aún.

A el también le preocupó el incremento del tráfico.

“Si la ciudad acepta [esto],  no habrían tomadoen consideración la seguridad y las inquietudes de la gente”, expresó el.

El dijo también que en su gran mayoríasus clientes, han tenido críticas negativas sobre el proyecto.

Linda García es directora del centrocultural que está actualmente justo donde Quadroid piensa colocar sus torres.

Linda teme perder el centro, el cualha estado allí durante ocho años y sirve a 85 niños. “Ellos alegan que nos proporcionaríanun espacio, pero no creo nada de eso”, dijo García.

Ella dijo también que cree que lastorres confrontaran problemas con la presión adecuada del agua.

Residents gathered around a proposed rezoning map that would create height limits to maintain structural continuity.

Residentes se reunieron en torno a unpropuesto
mapa de rezonificación el cual crearía límites de
altura paramantener la continuidad estructural.

“Tenemos un sistema de trenes aquí ysiempre hay problemas con el agua”, dijo ella. “Para mi, 30 pisos resulta ridículo.  Esta es un área tan empinada”.

James Lee, propietario de Buddha BeerBar en la calle 191 y Broadway,  dijoque el no cree que el proyecto llegue a una conclusión ya que Quadriad no espropietario del terreno en el cual piensa realizar el proyecto.

Pero el dijo no sorprenderle que los promotoresestén echando el ojo a Washington Heights e Inwood.

“Honestamente, yo creo que es buenopara el vecindario, siempre que este incorpore vivienda costeable.

Esta es la ciudad de Nueva York.  Usted no puede evitar tener un proyecto”,expresó el.

No obstante, puede ser que haya planesen proceso para garantizar que las torres no sean el estándar para losproyectos en el Norte de Manhattan.

Wayne Benjamin, presidente del Comité de Uso de Terrenos invitó a Edwin Marshall de DCP para mostrar a la comunidad y a  los miembros de la junta los mapas de lapropuesta de rezonificación del Distrito 9.

“That high of a building doesn’t belong here. It would be terrible,” said Rita.

“Un edificio de esa altura nopertenece
aquí. Sería terrible”, dijo Rita.

Marshall explicó que la propuesta  delManhattanville Project del 2007, le lanzó “un balde de agua fría”  a CB9 para completar los largamente esperados planes de rezonificación.

Y el presidente del Condado deManhattan Scott Stringer ha citado la rezonificación como una solución queayudaría a reducir futuros proyectos para edificios.

“La meta general de la zonificación fue la de preservar las características delvecindario”, dijo Marshall.  La rezonificaciónpropuesta abarca 90 manzanas del distrito 9, desde la calle 125 hasta la 155, entre Riverside en el Oeste hasta Edgecombre, Bradhurst, y Convent en el Este.

La zonificación actual no ha sidocambiada desde el1961, y no tiene límites en cuanto a la altura que mantendríala continuidad estructural.

Mientras tanto, la nueva rezonificaciónfrena el desenfreno en los proyectos con límites a la altura para que esténen sincronía con las estructuras existentes en el área.

Los límites a cuatro pisos fueron impuestosen manzanas consistentes de casas adoquinadas, mientras que en algunas manzanasllegarán al tope de 12 pisos.

James Lee, owner of Buddha Beer Bar, disbelieved the Quadriad project would be developed.

James Lee, propietario de Buddha Beer Bar, no
cree que el proyecto Quadriad será desarrollado.

El plan ha designado ya ciertas áreas,como P.S.189, para ser utilizadas como sitios para futuros proyectos devivienda asequible.

Los miembros de la Junta así como de la comunidad, escucharon atentamentecuando Marshall explicó la rezonificación, “Realmente me siento agradecida deque haya venido”, dijo Gail Addiss, quien es una crítica del proyecto Quadriad.

“Es un proceso complicado en el cualpoca gente está interesada, y que tiene un gran impacto en nuestra comunidad”.

Para más información sobre elpropuesto mapa de rezonificación del Distrito 9, visite: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/west_harlem/index.shtml