In the right gear
En la velocidad correcta

  • English
  • Español

In the right gear

Story by Rahimon Nasa and Debralee Santos

Photos by Rahimon Nasa

Earlier this year, Wayne Cion was making a turn at less than a mile per hour at 9 p.m. on 174th Street and Vyse Avenue in the Bronx when he heard a strange sound.

“It’s just a relief,” said Tamica Ennis.

“It’s just a relief,” said Tamica Ennis.

The bus operator, a veteran of over nine years, had accidentally struck a pedestrian in the intersection.

He immediately called 911, and emergency medical personnel arrived moments later.

So did officers from the New York Police Department (NYPD), who arrested Cion on the spot.

He was shocked.

“I didn’t get up that morning to drive the bus and hurt somebody,” said the operator.

The West Farms Bus facility is the city’s largest bus depot.

The West Farms Bus facility is the city’s largest bus depot.

Cion is among six bus operators arrested for violating the “Right of Way” provision under Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero Action Plan. The law made it a misdemeanor if a driver seriously injures or kills a pedestrian, and does not exercise “due care.”

Under the original provision, a driver would be charged with a criminal misdemeanor if a pedestrian or bicyclist was killed or sustained serious injury. The misdemeanor charge, which had previously been classified as a traffic infraction, also carried a fine of up to $250 and 30 days in jail.

“This is a huge victory,” said TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen.

“This is a huge victory,” said TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen.

In turn, the Transit Workers Union Local 100 (TWU), the city’s largest transit workers union, filed a federal suit in April against Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City of New York, claiming that Vision Zero was “unconstitutionally vague.”

The union, which represents municipal transportation workers on bus and subway lines, charged that the law did not “give a person of ordinary intelligence a reasonable opportunity to know what is prohibited.”

“We support the goals of Vision Zero [and] safer streets,” said TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen at the time. “But bus operation must not be criminalized. Subjecting bus operators to undeserved arrests does not solve the issue of dangerous hit-and-run driving.”

But now, there’s been a shift in gears, with a settlement between the city and TWU announced this past Mon., Aug. 31st.

The new agreement ensures that drivers will now be prosecuted under a negligence standard, and allows for a clearer definition of “due care” as expected from “reasonable prudent drivers.”

Moreover, under the amended law, drivers involved in an accident will not face arrest on the spot, but will be charged with a misdemeanor and given a ticket to show up in court.

A bus operator sets off on.

A bus operator sets off on.

The settlement will affect about 8,000 bus operators in the city.

In a statement, de Blasio said the agreement provided greater clarity for all parties and helped fulfill Vision Zero’s mission. He also pledged to work more closely with TWU to ensure the machinery and tools provided to the operators were of the highest standards.

“This settlement makes explicit what the city, the NYPD and district attorneys mean by ‘due care,’ and the standard we are using as we implement this law,” he said in a written release. “Just as important is our work to prevent these tragedies from happening in the first place, which is why the city is pushing for the safest possible bus equipment to ensure our hardworking bus operators have the tools they need to do their jobs safely. We look forward to partnering with the men and women of TWU Local 100 as we work to eliminate loss of life on our streets.”

“We look forward to partnering with the men and women of TWU Local 100,” said Mayor de Blasio.

“We look forward to partnering with the men and women of TWU Local 100,” said Mayor de Blasio.

Local drivers also welcomed the news.

“This had put a particular burden on a lot of people because once you’re arrested, you can’t drive a bus,” said Howard Davis.

Davis has been a bus operator for 30 years and is the Vice Chairman of the West Farms Bus Depot.

“Having this on your record also affects other opportunities in your livelihood, your family, your morale.”

The West Farms Bus facility is the largest bus depot in the city and is the base of operations for about 800 bus operators.

“[Here], we deal with some of the toughest lines in the city and even the United States,” said Davis.

In recent interviews, he and fellow operators insisted that while relieved to be free from the threat of instant arrest, they would be no less careful while on the road.

Operators welcomed news of the settlement.

Operators welcomed news of the settlement.

“No bus operator comes to work wanting to get into an accident,” said Frank Austin, TWU’s Director of Safety for the Department of Buses. “It’s a very humiliating and tragic thing to go through for people who have never been arrested before.”

“This is a huge victory,” added TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen. “Under this well-intentioned but poorly crafted law, bus operators were arrested and handcuffed like common criminals. This settlement safeguards all bus operators and other transit workers who drive MTA motor vehicles from arrest if involved in an accident lacking recklessness.”

He specifically heralded the decision to have NYPD officers consider whether an operator’s view might have been impeded by the side-view mirror. Operators have often cited the location and size of the mirrors affixed to buses as known “blind spots.”

“No bus operator comes to work wanting to get into an accident,” said Frank Austin, TWU’s Director of Safety.

“No bus operator comes to work wanting to get into an accident,” said Frank Austin, TWU’s Director of Safety.

“This is extremely significant,” he said. “They’re a significant problem for pedestrian safety.”

Bus operator Tamica Ennis drives the Bx33 from Mott Haven to 135th Street in Harlem. She said the safety training and protocols that she and others underwent were consistently rigorous, but they were not fail-safe.

“Even though they pound safety into our heads, I can’t control the elements I drive in,” said Ennis.

She beamed as she described hearing of the settlement.

“It’s just a relief now that I don’t have to worry about getting arrested for accidents [I know] were not due to my negligence.”

En la velocidad correcta

Historia por Rahimon Nasa y Debralee Santos

Fotos por Rahimon Nasa

A principios de este año, Wayne Cion daba una vuelta a menos de una milla por hora a las 9 pm en la calle 174 y la avenida Vyse, en el Bronx, cuando escuchó un sonido extraño.

El operador del autobús, un veterano de más de nueve años, había golpeado accidentalmente a un peatón en la intersección.

“No bus operator comes to work wanting to get into an accident,” said Frank Austin, TWU’s Director of Safety.

“Ningún operador de autobús viene a trabajar con ganas de tener un accidente”, dijo Frank Austin, director de Seguridad de TWU.

De inmediato llamó al 911 y el personal médico de emergencia llegó momentos después.

Lo mismo hicieron los oficiales del Departamento de Policía de Nueva York (NYPD), quienes arrestaron a Cion en el acto.

Él se sorprendió.

“No me levanté esa mañana para conducir el autobús y herir a alguien”, dijo el operador.

Cion se encuentra entre seis operadores de autobuses detenidos por violar la cláusula de “derecho de paso” en el Plan de Acción Vision Zero del alcalde de Blasio. La ley convirtió en un delito menor el que un conductor hiera seriamente o mate a un peatón, y no ejerza el “debido cuidado”.

Operators welcomed news of the settlement.

Los operadores acogieron las noticias.

En virtud de la cláusula original, un conductor podía ser acusado de un delito criminal menor si un peatón o ciclista moría o sufría lesiones graves. El cargo de delito menor, previamente clasificado como una infracción de tránsito, también llevaba una multa de hasta $250 dólares y 30 días de cárcel.

Por su parte, el Sindicato de Trabajadores de Tránsito Local 100 (TWU por sus siglas en inglés), el principal sindicato de trabajadores de tránsito de la ciudad, presentó una demanda federal en abril contra el alcalde Bill de Blasio y la ciudad de New York, alegando que Vision Zero era “inconstitucionalmente vaga”.

El sindicato, que representa a los trabajadores municipales del transporte de las líneas de autobús y metro, denunció que la ley no “da a una persona de inteligencia ordinaria una oportunidad razonable para saber lo que está prohibido”.

“We look forward to partnering with the men and women of TWU Local 100,” said Mayor de Blasio.

“Esperamos poder asociarnos con los hombres y mujeres de TWU Local 100”, dijo el alcalde de Blasio.

“Apoyamos los objetivos de Vision Zero [y] calles más seguras”, dijo en el momento John Samuelsen, presidente de TWU Local 100. “Pero la operación del autobús no debe ser criminalizada. Someter a los operadores de autobuses a detenciones inmerecidas no resuelve el problema de la conducción peligrosa ni el atropello con fuga”.

Pero ahora ha habido un cambio de marcha, con un acuerdo entre la ciudad y TWU anunciado el pasado lunes 31 de agosto

El nuevo acuerdo asegura que los conductores ahora serán procesados bajo un estándar de negligencia y permite una definición más clara de “debido cuidado” como se espera de “conductores prudentes razonables”.

Por otra parte, bajo la ley modificada, los conductores implicados en un accidente no serán arrestados en el lugar, pero serán acusados de un delito menor y recibirán una multa para aparecer en la corte.

El acuerdo afectará a unos 8,000 operadores de autobuses de la ciudad.

A bus operator sets off on.

Un operador de autobús emprende el camino.

En un comunicado, de Blasio dijo que el acuerdo proporciona una mayor claridad para todas las partes y ayudó a cumplir la misión de Vision Zero. También se comprometió a trabajar más estrechamente con TWU para asegurar que la maquinaria y las herramientas proporcionadas a los operadores sean de los más altos estándares.

“Este acuerdo hace explícito el significado de lo que la ciudad, la policía de Nueva York y los fiscales de distrito entienden por “debido cuidado”, y el estándar que utilizamos a medida que implementamos esta ley”, dijo en un comunicado escrito. “Nuestro trabajo es muy importante para evitar que estas tragedias ocurran en primer lugar, por lo que la ciudad está presionando para que los equipos de autobuses sean lo más seguros posibles para garantizar que nuestros operadores tengan las herramientas que necesitan para hacer su trabajo de manera segura. Buscamos asociarnos con los hombres y mujeres de TWU Local 100 a medida que trabajamos para evitar las pérdidas de vidas en nuestras calles”.

“This is a huge victory,” said TWU Local 100 President John Samuelsen.

“Esta es una gran victoria”, dijo John Samuelsen, presidente de TWU Local 100.

Los conductores locales también acogieron con satisfacción la noticia.

“Esto puso una carga especial en muchas personas, porque una vez que fuiste arrestado, no puedes conducir un autobús”, dijo Howard Davis.

Davis ha sido operador de autobús durante 30 años y es el vicepresidente de West Farms Bus Depot.

“Tener esto en tu registro también afecta otras oportunidades, tu sustento, tu familia, tu moral”.

La instalación de West Farms es el mayor depósito de autobuses de la ciudad y es la base de unos 800 operadores.

“[Aquí] nos ocupamos de algunas de las líneas más difíciles de la ciudad e incluso de los Estados Unidos”, dijo Davis.

En entrevistas recientes, él y sus compañeros operadores insistieron en que, si bien se sienten aliviados de estar libres de la amenaza de ser arrestados de inmediato, no tendrían menos cuidado en el camino.

“Ningún operador de autobús viene a trabajar con ganas de tener un accidente”, dijo Frank Austin, director de Seguridad en el Departamento de autobuses de TWU. “Es muy humillante y trágico para las personas que nunca han sido arrestadas antes”.

La instalación West Farms Bus es la estación de autobuses de la ciudad más grande.

La instalación West Farms Bus es la estación de autobuses de la ciudad más grande.

“Esta es una gran victoria”, añadió John Samuelsen, presidente de TWU Local 100. “Bajo esta ley bien intencionada, pero mal diseñada, operadores de autobuses fueron detenidos y esposados como delincuentes comunes. Este acuerdo protege a los operadores de autobuses -y a otros trabajadores del transporte que conducen vehículos de motor de MTA- de ser arrestados si participan en un accidente carente de imprudencia”.

Él anunció específicamente la decisión de que sean los oficiales del NYPD los que consideren si la visión de un operador pudo haber estado impedida por el retrovisor lateral. Los operadores a menudo han citado la ubicación y el tamaño de los espejos fijados a los autobuses como conocidos “puntos ciegos”.

“Esto es muy importante”, dijo. “Son un problema significativo para la seguridad de los peatones”.

“Es simplemente un alivio”, dijo Tamica Ennis.

“Es simplemente un alivio”, dijo Tamica Ennis.

Tamica Ennis, operadora de autobús, maneja el Bx33 de Mott Haven a la calle 135 en Harlem.  Dijo que el entrenamiento de seguridad y los protocolos a los que ella y los demás se sometieron fueron siempre rigurosos, pero no a prueba de fallas.

“A pesar de que te bombardean tanta información sobre la seguridad, uno no puede controlar todos los elementos al conducir”, dijo Ennis.

Ella sonrió mientras describía la audiencia del acuerdo.

“Es simplemente un alivio no tener que preocuparme de ser arrestada por accidentes [que sé] no sucedieron debido a mi negligencia”.