In line of duty, loss and honor

En cumplimiento del deber, pérdida y honor

  • English
  • Español

In line of duty, loss and honor

Enduring legacies of fallen officers

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi

“Twenty five years later, people still talk about Michael Buczek," says sister Mary Jo. <br /><i>Photo: MJ Buczek</i>

“Twenty five years later, people still talk about Michael Buczek,” says sister Mary Jo.
Photo: MJ Buczek

Officers Hoban and Buczek never met.

But their names are inextricably linked in New York City’s history.

On Oct. 18, 1988, both men were shot and killed in the line of duty.

It was a Tuesday night. Christopher Hoban’s younger brother Martin was home, watching the Dodgers and the A’s in game three of the World Series. Michael Buczek’s older sister Mary Jo was home, too. She was watching a Patty Duke movie, Fatal Judgment.

One of the character’s names sounded like Buczek. “You’ve got to watch this movie,” she told her mother. “You’re never going to hear your name on TV.”

Hoban and Buczek didn’t grow up in police families, but they both wanted to join New York’s Finest at a young age.

Martin Hoban remembered a fire on their street in Bay Ridge. His brother Chris ran into a burning building to save someone. “He was probably 13 years old,” Hoban said. “He always had that in him.”

Buczek grew up in suburban New Jersey. He liked sports. He played baseball, football and golf. He played pranks on his older brother and sister.

“But he noticed things,” said Mary Jo. A car parked on the street would catch his attention if it had a damaged lock. “He knew the car was stolen,” she said. “For a suburban kid, he was very streetwise.”

"He always had that in him," says Martin Hoban of his brother Chris' inclination to help. </br><i>Photo (left): Hoban Family </i>

“He always had that in him,” says Martin Hoban of his brother Chris’ inclination to help.
Photo (left): Hoban Family

Buczek joined the 34th Precinct in July of 1985 as a rookie cop. “It was considered one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the city at the time,” said Sgt. Johnny Moynihan. Fresh out of the police academy, Moynihan arrived six months after Buczek.

At the time, the 34 covered a huge area—from 155th St. in Manhattan to 225th St. in the Bronx. “A lot of rookies got assigned there,” said Moynihan. “They needed the policemen.”

Buczek was active on the force. “He had a great reputation for a young cop,” said Moynihan. “He made a lot of outstanding arrests.”

They started their careers as the city was awash in guns, cheap crack and plentiful cocaine. In 1988, the year that Hoban and Buczek died, the 34th Precinct recorded 75 homicides, second only to East New York’s 105 murders.

Each day was like going to battle. Moynihan said, “The tough reality of being a policeman is that sometimes you are exposed to things that the average person doesn’t see. It’s part of the job.”

Whatever Buczek saw, he shared with his father, Ted. A World War II Navy veteran, “Mr. B” listened as his son described seeing young children living in cars, and mothers so drug-addled they couldn’t care for their children.

Every spring, the Michael Buczek Little League team marches down Amsterdam Avenue.

Every spring, the Michael Buczek Little League team marches down Amsterdam Avenue.

Once he came to the house in the middle of the day to talk to his mother, Josephine. He described everything that would happen if he died on duty. You’ll get a phone call, he told her. You’ll see my picture in the paper, he went on.

“He went through the list,” his sister Mary Jo recalled.

Chris Hoban, 26, was an undercover detective with Manhattan North Narcotics. On Oct. 18, 1988, he and his partner, Officer Michael Jermyn, were making a buy at a drug dealer’s apartment on W. 105th St. The dealer suggested Hoban try it before buying.

Hoban refused. Unless an officer’s life is in danger, sampling drugs is against police protocol. The cocaine was for his girlfriend, not him, he said. One of the men grabbed a gun and held it to his head. They searched him, but didn’t find his weapon. But when they found his partner’s gun, a scuffle ensued and Hoban was shot. He was pronounced dead at St. Luke’s. One of the dealers was killed at the scene. The other two got 25 years to life.

Two hours hours later, Buczek, 24, and his partner, Officer Joseph Barbato, were on an unrelated call at a Washington Heights apartment when they saw two men leave the building.

Buczek was killed in 1988. <br /><i>Photo: MJ Buczek </i>

Buczek was killed in 1988.
Photo: MJ Buczek

Buczek knew something was wrong. The officers followed them outside to 161st St. and Broadway.

What they didn’t know was that the two men, Daniel Mirambeaux and Pablo Almonte, had robbed a drug dealer in the building. The officers asked them to stop. When they didn’t, Buczek grabbed Almonte. Mirambeaux shot Buczek in the chest, mortally wounding him. Mirambeaux fled with Almonte.

Hoban and Buczek were two of seven police officers killed that year. Drug dealers killed Officer Edward Byrne in February. In April, Officer Anthony McLean was shot and killed. Sgt. John McCormick was shot and killed in Inwood just weeks before his retirement. Police Officer Gary Peaco was killed in an auto accident while responding to an officer assist call. Police Officer Joseph Galapo died after his partner accidently shot him during an arrest.

Byrne’s murder focused the city’s attention on drug dealers, said Nicholas Estavillo, but the killings of Hoban and Buczek heightened it.

Estavillo, the 34 Precinct’s Commanding Officer in 1990, said city officials concentrated efforts on one precinct in each borough. Estavillo instituted new, community policing at the 34. The involvement of the FBI, the DEA, other federal agencies and generous amounts of funding helped crime recede.

Hundreds of runners compete in the Annual Chris Hoban 5-Mile Run every fall. </br><i>Photo: www.hobanrun.org </i>

Hundreds of runners compete in the Annual Chris Hoban 5-Mile Run every fall.
Photo: www.hobanrun.org

But it took more than 14 years before Buczek’s killers were brought to justice. Mirambeaux and Almonte, along with another man, José Fernández, fled to the Dominican Republic. “There was no treaty to extradite people,” said Mary Jo. “That’s one of the things my brother’s death changed.”

And it was Buczek’s father Mr. B’s tireless efforts with police and Immigration officials that led to the killers’ capture. “He didn’t have the word ‘no’ in his vocabulary,” she said. “He was a fighter. He never let the police forget that he wanted those killers caught.”

Mirambeaux was extradited in 1989, and died mysteriously at the airport on his way to the U.S. Almonte and Fernández were also extradited. In 2003, they were convicted and sentenced 25 years to life.

The murders of Hoban and Buczek had a profound effect on the families, the precincts and the city. “Initially, I was pretty angry and shocked,” said Martin Hoban, who was 20 at the time. “The outpouring of love from people was a lot to handle, too.”

At Buczek’s wake, a young Dominican family with children traveled to New Jersey and waited in line for hours to pay their respects. “I was so touched and moved by that,” said Mary Jo. “We all were.”

Ultimately, she said, they had a choice. You could be bitter and hate or take the experience and transform it into something beautiful.

“He had a great reputation for a young cop,” said Johnny Moynihan (far right), with Ted Buczek (left) and Commissioner Ray Kelly. </br><i>Photo: MJ Buczek </i>

“He had a great reputation for a young cop,” said Johnny Moynihan (far right), with Ted Buczek (left) and Commissioner Ray Kelly.
Photo: MJ Buczek

Every spring, the Michael Buczek Little League team marches down Amsterdam Avenue. Mr. B. was instrumental in getting the field cleaned up for the children, getting lights donated and countless other details. Every year until he died in 2010, Mr. B. tossed out the first ball of the season. He told Moynihan, the league’s president and head coach, that he had a contract for life. He also successfully lobbied for P.S. 48 to be named after his son.

Every fall, hundreds of runners compete in the Annual Chris Hoban 5-Mile Run. The full day festival attracts more than a thousand people. Its proceeds fund the Hoban Scholarship at Xaverian High School in Bay Ridge.

Every Oct. 18, people gather at St. Elizabeth’s to mourn the passing of two of New York’s Finest.

Twenty-five years after her brother’s death, Mary Jo said that her brother was uncannily correct when he told his mother what would happen if he died in the line of duty.

Except for one thing.

“He said, ‘You’ll see my name in the paper for one or two days and then I’ll be forgotten’,” she said. “Twenty five years later, people still talk about Michael Buczek.”

For more information on the Buczek Little League, please visit www.eteamz.com/michaelbuczeklittleleague.

For more information on the Hoban 5-Mile Run, please visit www.hobanrun.org.

En cumplimiento del deber, pérdida y honor

Legados para la posteridad de los oficiales caídos

Historia por Sherry Mazzocchi

“Veinticinco años después, la gente todavía habla de Michael Buczek", dijo la hermana Mary Jo. </br><i>Foto: MJ Buczek </i>

“Veinticinco años después, la gente todavía habla de Michael Buczek”, dijo la hermana Mary Jo.
Foto: MJ Buczek

Los oficiales Hoban y Buczek nunca se conocieron.

Pero sus nombres están íntimamente relacionados con la historia de la ciudad de Nueva York.

El 18 de octubre de 1988, ambos hombres fueron abatidos a tiros en el cumplimiento de su deber.

Era un martes por la noche. El hermano menor de Christopher Hoban, Martin, estaba en casa viendo a los Dodgers y los Atléticos en el tercer juego de la Serie Mundial. Mary Jo, la hermana mayor de Michael Buczek, estaba en casa también viendo una película de Patty Duke, ‘Fatal Judgment’.

Uno de los nombres de los personajes sonaba como Buczek. “Tienes que ver esta película”, dijo a su madre. “Nunca vas a escuchar tu nombre en la televisión”.

Hoban y Buczek no crecieron en familias de policía, pero los dos querían unirse a la mejor policía, la de Nueva York, a una edad temprana.

Martin Hoban recordó un incendio en su calle en Bay Ridge. Su hermano Chris corrió dentro del edificio en llamas para salvar a alguien. “Probablemente tenía 13 años de edad”, dijo Hoban. “Siempre tuvo ese instinto en él”.

"Siempre tuvo ese instinto" dijo Martin Hoban de la inclinación de su hermano Chris para ayudar a los demás. </br><i>Foto (izq.): Familia Hoban </i>

“Siempre tuvo ese instinto” dijo Martin Hoban de la inclinación de su hermano Chris para ayudar a los demás.
Foto (izq.): Familia Hoban

Buczek se crió en los suburbios de Nueva Jersey. Le gustaban los deportes. Jugó béisbol, futbol y golf. Jugaba bromas a su hermano mayor y su hermana.

“Pero se daba cuenta de las cosas”, dijo Mary Jo. Un coche estacionado en la calle llamaría su atención si tenía una cerradura dañada. “Sabía que el coche había sido robado”, dijo. “Para ser un niño de los suburbios, él era muy espabilado”.

Buczek se unió a la Comisaría 34 en julio de 1985 como un policía novato. “Era considerado uno de los barrios más peligrosos de la ciudad en el momento”, dijo el sargento Johnny Moynihan. Recién salido de la academia de policía, Moynihan llegó seis meses después de Buczek.

En ese momento, la 34 cubría una gran área, desde la calle 155 en Manhattan, hasta la calle 225 en el Bronx. “Una gran cantidad de novatos fueron asignados ahí”, dijo Moynihan. “Necesitaban a los policías”.

Buczek era activo en la fuerza. “Tenía una gran reputación para un joven policía”, dijo Moynihan. “Él hizo un montón de detenciones espectaculares”.

Ellos comenzaron su carrera mientras la ciudad se inundaba de armas, crack y abundante cocaína barata. En 1988, año en que Hoban y Buczek murieron, la Comisaría 34 registró 75 homicidios, sólo superada por 105 asesinatos en East New York.

Cada día era como ir a una batalla. Moynihan dijo: “La dura realidad de ser un agente de policía es que a veces estás expuesto a cosas que la persona promedio no ve. Es parte del trabajo”.

Cualquiera cosa que Buczek veía, la compartía con su padre, Ted, un veterano de la marina de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. “Mr. B” escuchaba cómo su hijo describía haber visto niños pequeños viviendo en automóviles y a madres tan drogadas que no podían cuidar de sus hijos.

Cada primavera, el equipo de la pequeña liga Michael Buczek marcha sobre la avenida Ámsterdam.

Cada primavera, el equipo de la pequeña liga Michael Buczek marcha sobre la avenida Ámsterdam.

Una vez llegó a la casa al medio día para hablar con su madre, Josephine. Describió todo lo que pasaría si moría en servicio. Vas a recibir una llamada telefónica, le dijo. Vas a ver mi foto en el periódico, continuó.

“Recorrió toda la lista”, recordó su hermana Mary Jo.

Chris Hoban, de 26 años, era un detective encubierto de narcóticos del norte de Manhattan. El 18 de octubre de 1988 él y su compañero, el oficial Michael Jermyn, estaban haciendo una compra en el departamento de un traficante de drogas en la calle 105 oeste. El traficante sugirió que Hoban la probara antes de comprarla.

Hoban se negó. A menos que la vida de un oficial esté en peligro, probar drogas va en contra del protocolo policial. La cocaína era para su novia, no para él, dijo. Uno de los hombres agarró una pistola y se la acercó a la cabeza. Lo registraron, pero no encontraron su arma, cuando encontraron la de su compañero sobrevino una pelea y Hoban fue asesinado. Fue declarado muerto en St. Luke’s. Uno de los traficantes murió en la escena. Los otros dos recibieron de 25 años a cadena perpetua.

Dos horas más tarde, Buczek, de 24 años, y su compañero, el oficial Joseph Barbato, se encontraban en un llamado no relacionado en un departamento en Washington Heights cuando vieron a dos hombres salir del edificio.

Buczek sabía que algo andaba mal. Los oficiales los siguieron afuera a la calle 161 y Broadway.

Buczek murió en el 1988. </br><i>Foto: MJ Buczek </i>

Buczek murió en el 1988.
Foto: MJ Buczek

Lo que ellos no sabían era que los dos hombres, Daniel Mirambeaux y Pablo Almonte, habían robado a un traficante de drogas en el edificio. Los oficiales les pidieron que se detuvieran, cuando no lo hicieron, Buczek agarró a Almonte. Mirambeaux disparó a Buczek en el pecho, hiriéndolo de muerte. Mirambeaux huyó con Almonte.

Hoban y Buczek fueron dos de los siete policías muertos ese año. Narcotraficantes mataron al oficial Edward Byrne en febrero. En abril, el oficial Anthony McLean fue muerto a tiros. El sargento John McCormick fue muerto a tiros en Inwood sólo unas semanas antes de su retiro. El oficial de policía Gary Peaco murió en un accidente automovilístico mientras respondía a un llamado para asistir a un oficial. El oficial de policía Joseph Galapo murió después de que su compañero accidentalmente le disparara durante un arresto.

El asesinato de Byrne centró la atención de la ciudad sobre los traficantes de drogas, dijo Nicholas Estavillo, pero los asesinatos de Hoban y Buczek la acentuaron.

Estavillo, Comandante de la Comisaría 34 en 1990, dijo que los oficiales de la ciudad concentraron los esfuerzos en un precinto en cada condado. Estavillo instituyó una nueva policía comunitaria en la 34. La participación del FBI, la DEA, otras agencias federales y generosas cantidades de fondos ayudaron a retroceder el crimen.

Cientos de corredores compiten en la carrera anual Chris Hoban de 5 millas cada otoño. </br><i>Foto: www.hobanrun.org </i>

Cientos de corredores compiten en la carrera anual Chris Hoban de 5 millas cada otoño.
Foto: www.hobanrun.org

Pero tuvieron que pasar más de 14 años antes de que los asesinos de Buczek fueran llevados ante la justicia. Mirambeaux y Almonte, junto con otro hombre, José Fernández, huyeron a la República Dominicana.

“No había ningún tratado para extraditar personas”, dijo Mary Jo. “Esa fue una de las cosas que la muerte de mi hermano cambió”.

Y fueron los incansables esfuerzos del padre de Buczek, el Sr. B, con la policía y los funcionarios de inmigración que llevaron a la captura de los asesinos. “No tenía la palabra no en su vocabulario”, dijo ella. “Él era un luchador. Nunca dejó que la policía se olvidara de que quería a esos asesinos capturados”.

Mirambeaux fue extraditado en 1989 y murió misteriosamente en el aeropuerto en su camino a Estados Unidos. Almonte y Fernández también fueron extraditados. En 2003 fueron declarados culpables y condenados de 25 años a cadena perpetua.

Los asesinatos de Hoban y Buczek tuvieron un profundo efecto en las familias, las comisarías y la ciudad. “Al principio, estaba muy enojado y sorprendido”, dijo Martin Hoban, quien tenía 20 años en ese momento. “El flujo de amor de la gente era mucho para manejar también”.

En el funeral de Buczek, una joven familia dominicana con niños viajó a Nueva Jersey y esperó en fila durante horas para presentar sus respetos. “Estaba tan conmovida”, dijo Mary Jo. “Todos lo estábamos”.

En última instancia, dijo, tenían una elección. Podíamos amargarnos y odiar o tomar la experiencia y transformarla en algo hermoso.

"Tenía una gran reputación para un joven policía", dijo Johnny Moynihan (der.), con Ted Buczek (izq.) y Comisionado Ray Kelly (centro). </br><i>Foto: MJ Buczek </i>

“Tenía una gran reputación para un joven policía”, dijo Johnny Moynihan (der.), con Ted Buczek (izq.) y Comisionado Ray Kelly (centro).
Foto: MJ Buczek

Cada primavera, el equipo de la pequeña liga Michael Buczek marcha sobre la avenida Ámsterdam. El Sr. B. fue determinante para que el campo fuera limpiado para los niños, consiguió luces donadas y un sinfín de detalles. Todos los años, hasta que murió en 2010, el Sr. B. lanzaba la primera bola de la temporada. Él dijo a Moynihan, presidente de la liga y entrenador en jefe, que tenía un contrato de por vida. También cabildeó con éxito para que la P.S. 48 fuera llamada en honor a su hijo.

Cada otoño, cientos de corredores compiten en la carrera anual Chris Hoban de 5 millas. El festival de un día completo atrae a más de un millar de personas. Sus ingresos financian la Beca Hoban en la escuela secundaria Xaverian de Bay Ridge.

Cada 18 de octubre la gente se reúne en St. Elizabeth para llorar la muerte de los dos policías de Nueva York.

Veinticinco años después de la muerte de su hermano, Mary Jo dijo que él había sido extrañamente exacto cuando le dijo a su madre lo que pasaría si moría en el cumplimiento del deber. Excepto por una cosa.

Él dijo: “Vas a ver mi nombre en el periódico por uno o dos días y luego voy a ser olvidado”. “Veinticinco años después, la gente todavía habla de Michael Buczek”.

Para más información sobre la pequeña liga Michael Buczek, favor visite www.eteamz.com/michaelbuczeklittleleague.

Para más información sobre el ‘Hoban 5-Mile Run,’ favor visite www.hobanrun.org.