Hunger, of all tongues
Hambre en todos los idiomas

  • English
  • Español

Hunger, of all tongues

Story by Marimer Navarrete

Poverty is spoken in all languages.

A recent forum held uptown sought to challenge notions on how poverty looks and sounds.

A roundtable discussion recently focused on poverty within the Jewish community. Among them were (from left to right): The Workmen’s Circle Executive Director Ann Toback; Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and The Workmen’s Circle Social Justice Director Larry Moskowitz (far right).

A roundtable discussion recently focused on poverty within the Jewish community. Among them were (from left to right): The Workmen’s Circle Executive Director Ann Toback; Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and The Workmen’s Circle Social Justice Director Larry Moskowitz (far right).

The YM and YWHA of Washington Heights and Inwood served as host to a roundtable discussion on hunger, food insecurity and poverty and its effects on local Jewish residents.

The event, organized by a host of non-profit organizations and Councilmembers Mark Levine and Ydanis Rodríguez, sought to shed light on what was described as “one of the most pressing issues” for the community.

Among those in attendance on Oct. 21st were members of the Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, the Fort Tryon Jewish Center, the Jewish Community Council of Washington Heights-Inwood, and the Hebrew Tabernacle.

During the discussion, a 2011 report issued by the United Jewish Appeal (UJA) which uncovered rising levels of poverty within the Jewish community, was highlighted.

Councilmember Mark Levine is the Chair of the City Council's Jewish Caucus.

Russian-speaking seniors used simultaneous translation services.

“According to the study, 45% of Jewish children in NYC live in poor or near poor households, and 30% of Jewish households in Washington Heights and Inwood are poor or near poor – more than any Manhattan neighborhood,” noted Levine, Chair of the City Council’s Jewish Caucus.

One of the report’s authors, Steven M. Cohen, said that they also found out that nearly 1 in 5 Jewish households is poor today, with incomes under 150% of the federal poverty guidelines, and the proportion of poor Jewish households is higher than it was 10 years ago.

Some of the hardest hit were Russian language speakers.

“There are about 220,000 Jewish people live in Russian-speaking households, and the poorest Jews in New York are Russian-speaking seniors living alone, of which 77% are poor,” said Cohen, who also serves as Director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at NYU Wagner, and a member of the Workmen’s Circle, an advocacy group focused on community and social justice,

Councilmember Mark Levine is the Chair of the City Council's Jewish Caucus.

Councilmember Mark Levine is the Chair of the City Council’s Jewish Caucus.

“They escaped the former Soviet Union but are essentially destitute.”

The language gap, explained forum organizers, has hindered the ability of well-educated, highly skilled professionals who often have mastered complex disciplines in their native countries – and tongues – to secure gainful employment once they are in the United States.

The consequences for those who are older can be even more profound.

Alex Kuzmin has three master’s degrees – in Economics, Engineering, and Human Resources.

But the political refugee, who fled from the former Soviet Union, said that all of his studies there were conducted in Russian.

To begin his work again – in a foreign language – would have been economically and socially impossible.

“Because in the USSR, almost nobody older than 40 years old was given English classes [then],” he explained.

Instead, upon arrival, Kuzmin and his fellow émigres have often landed jobs on a lower end of the pay scale, such as driving cabs or working at fast food stores.

Kuzmin suggested that a concerted intervention to spur economic development was needed.

“I think if there is created a special program for the Russian community to help them open small business, they not only can help themselves provide for their family but also create and give jobs to other Russians,” he said.

Dr. Nataly Mironova, who has earned multiple degrees in engineering and governance, said she too had struggled.

“Back in Russia, I was an educator who taught civilians a very special master class about nuclear issues and human rights,” she said. “But here, I have no connection with the education system.”

The published book author agreed that more needed to be done.

“They should create some kind of a bridge to help us immigrant professionals improve our English in order to get certified to work as licensed American professionals,” said Mironova. “[This way] we can contribute to the country who received us with open arms.”

Dmitri Daniel Glinski, President and CEO of the Russian-Speaking Community Council of Manhattan and the Bronx, Inc. (RCCMB), addressed his remarks specifically to the Councilmembers and urged them to create greater access to resources to an underserved community.

He called for a task force helmed by elected officials on how to best achieve Russian-speaking immigrant integration; Russian-speaking community liaisons in the offices of elected officials; and greater funding allocations.

“The poorest Jews in New York are Russian-speaking seniors living alone,” said author Steven M. Cohen.

“The poorest Jews in New York are Russian-speaking seniors living alone,” said author Steven M. Cohen.

Councilmember Rodríguez said he was committed to ensuring the well-being of all his constituents in equal measure.

“When we address poverty, we do it in any part of the city and in any community group,” he argued.

Rodríguez pledged to bring city commissioners and corresponding staff members uptown to the the YM & YWHA in coming weeks to meet with residents directly and to gauge specific needs.

He also cited the recent announcement by the State Wage Board to raise to fast food workers’ minimum wage to $15 an hour as an indication of how an organized effort could bring attention – and action – to an important cause.

“We will continue fighting poverty in this community,” he said. “Our next step should be to bring as many people of the working class to receive the $15 per hour wage increase.”

“We really need to take action,” said Ann Toback, Executive Director of the Workmen’s Circle. “The best way to address this situation is to bring about changes like increasing the state’s minimum wage.”

For more information on the report, please visit http://bit.ly/1vXE9JW or visit the Russian-Speaking Community Council of Manhattan and the Bronx, Inc. at www.rccmb.org.

Major findings of the 2011 UJA Report included:

  • One in five New York-area Jewish households is poor. In New York City alone: one in four.
  • One in 10 New York-area Jewish households is near poor.
  • There are twice as many people living in poor Jewish households today as there were in 1991.
  • Fourteen percent of the Jewish poor and 9 percent of the Jewish near poor say they cannot make ends meet, and more than 60 percent of both groups say they are just managing to make ends meet.
  • The largest group of poor Jewish households in the New York area is Russian-speaking seniors.
  • Russian-speaking seniors have the highest incidence (percent) of poverty of any group in the New York Jewish community.
  • Hasidic households have the second-largest number of poor households and the largest number of people in poor Jewish households. They also rank near the top in the number of near poor and the incidence of near poverty.

Hambre en todos los idiomas

Historia por Marimer Navarrete

“The poorest Jews in New York are Russian-speaking seniors living alone,” said author Steven M. Cohen.

“Los judíos más pobres de Nueva York son los adultos mayores de habla rusa que viven solas”, dijo el autor Steven M. Cohen.

La pobreza se habla en todas las lenguas.

Un reciente foro celebrado en el norte del condado buscó cuestionar la idea de cómo se ve y suena la pobreza.

La YM y YWHA de Washington Heights e Inwood organizó una mesa redonda sobre el hambre, la inseguridad alimentaria, la pobreza y sus efectos en los residentes judíos locales.

El evento, organizado por un grupo de organizaciones no lucrativas y los concejales Mark Levine e Ydanis Rodríguez, trató de arrojar luz sobre lo que fue descrito como “uno de los temas más urgentes” de la comunidad.

Entre los asistentes el 21 de octubre había miembros de judíos por la Justicia Económica y Racial, el Centro Judío Fort Tryon, el Consejo de la Comunidad Judía de Washington Heights-Inwood y el Tabernáculo Hebreo.

Durante el debate fue destacado un informe de 2011 emitido por la United Jewish Appeal (UJA), que descubrió crecientes niveles de pobreza dentro de la comunidad judía.

“De acuerdo con el estudio, el 45% de los niños judíos en Nueva York viven en hogares pobres o casi pobres, y el 30% de los hogares judíos en Washington Heights e Inwood son pobres o casi pobres, más que en cualquier barrio de Manhattan”, señaló Levine, presidente del caucus judío del Ayuntamiento.

Uno de los autores del informe, Steven M. Cohen, dijo que también descubrieron que casi 1 de cada 5 hogares judíos es pobre actualmente, con ingresos por debajo del 150% del nivel federal de pobreza, y la proporción de los hogares judíos pobres es mayor a lo que era hace 10 años.

Algunos de los más afectados son los hablantes de la lengua rusa.

“Existen alrededor de 220,000 judíos viviendo en hogares de habla rusa y los judíos más pobres de Nueva York son los adultos mayores de habla rusa que viven solas, de las cuales el 77% son pobres”, dijo Cohen, quien también se desempeña como director del Archivo Político judío Berman de la NYU Wagner, y miembro del Círculo de los Trabajadores, un grupo de defensa enfocado en la comunidad y la justicia social.

“Ellos escaparon de la antigua Unión Soviética, pero están esencialmente desamparados”.

La brecha del idioma, explicaron los organizadores del foro, ha obstaculizado la capacidad de los profesionales bien educados, altamente cualificados, que han dominado disciplinas complejas en sus países -y lenguas- de origen para asegurar un empleo remunerado una vez que están en los Estados Unidos.

Las consecuencias para los que son más viejos pueden ser aún más profundas.

Alex Kuzmin tiene tres grados de maestría, en Economía, Ingeniería y Recursos Humanos.

Pero el refugiado político, quien huyó de la antigua Unión Soviética, dijo que todos sus estudios los realizó en ruso.

Empezar su trabajo de nuevo -en una lengua extranjera- sería económica y socialmente imposible.

“Debido a que en la URSS casi nadie mayor de 40 años de edad recibió clases de inglés [entonces]”, explicó.

En cambio, a su llegada, Kuzmin y sus compañeros migrantes a menudo consiguieron empleos en un extremo inferior de la escala salarial, conduciendo taxis o trabajando en tiendas de comida rápida.

Kuzmin sugirió que era necesaria una intervención concertada para estimular el desarrollo económico.

El concejal Mark Levine es el presidente del caucus judío del Ayuntamiento.

El concejal Mark Levine es el presidente del caucus judío del Ayuntamiento.

“Creo que si se crea un programa especial para ayudar a la comunidad rusa a abrir pequeños negocios, no sólo podríamos proveer a nuestras familia, también crearíamos empleos para otros rusos”, dijo.

La Dra. Nataly Mironova, quien ha recibido varios títulos en ingeniería y gobernanza, dijo que ella también ha luchado.

“En Rusia, era una educadora que enseñaba a los civiles una clase magistral muy especial sobre cuestiones nucleares y de derechos humanos”, dijo. “Pero aquí no tengo ninguna relación con el sistema educativo”.

La autora de libros publicados estuvo de acuerdo en que aún queda mucho por hacer.

“Deberían crear una especie de puente para ayudarnos a los inmigrantes profesionales a mejorar nuestro inglés para obtener la certificación y trabajar como profesionales estadounidenses con licencia”, dijo Mironova. “[De esta manera] podríamos contribuir al país que nos recibió con los brazos abiertos”.

Los adultos mayores de habla rusa utilizan servicios de traducción simultánea.

Los adultos mayores de habla rusa utilizan servicios de traducción simultánea.

Dmitri Daniel Glinski, presidente y director general del Consejo Comunitario de habla rusa de Manhattan y el Bronx, Inc. (RCCMB por sus siglas en inglés), dirigió sus comentarios específicamente a los concejales y los instó a crear un mayor acceso a los recursos para una comunidad marginada.

Pidió un grupo de trabajo dirigido por funcionarios electos para lograr una mejor integración de los inmigrantes de habla rusa, de los enlaces de la comunidad de habla rusa en las oficinas de los funcionarios electos y mayores asignaciones de fondos.

El concejal Rodríguez dijo estar comprometido a garantizar el bienestar de todos sus electores en igual medida.

“Cuando abordamos la pobreza, lo hacemos en cualquier parte de la ciudad y en cualquier grupo comunitario”, argumentó.

Rodríguez se comprometió a llevar a comisionados de la ciudad y miembros del personal correspondientes al norte del condado a la YM y YWHA en las próximas semanas para reunirse con los residentes directamente y evaluar las necesidades específicas.

A roundtable discussion recently focused on poverty within the Jewish community. Among them were (from left to right): The Workmen’s Circle Executive Director Ann Toback; Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and The Workmen’s Circle Social Justice Director Larry Moskowitz (far right).

Una reciente mesa redonda se enfocó en la pobreza dentro de la comunidad judía. Entre los participantes se encontraban (de izquierda a derecha): la directora ejecutiva del Círculo de Trabajadores, Ann Toback Toback; el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez y el director del Círculo de Justicia Social de los Trabajadores, Larry Moskowitz (extrema derecha).

También citó el reciente anuncio de la Junta Estatal de Salario para elevar el salario mínimo de los trabajadores de comida rápida a $15 dólares la hora como indicativo de cómo un esfuerzo organizado puede llamar la atención -y la acción- a una causa importante.

“Vamos a seguir luchando contra la pobreza en esta comunidad”, dijo. “Nuestro próximo paso debe ser lograr que la mayor cantidad de personas de la clase trabajadora reciba el aumento salarial de $15 dólares por hora”.

“Realmente tenemos que tomar medidas”, dijo Ann Toback, directora ejecutiva del Círculo de Trabajadores. “La mejor manera de hacer frente a esta situación es provocar cambios, como aumentar el salario mínimo estatal”.

Para más información sobre el reporte, por favor visite http://bit.ly/1vXE9JW o vaya al Consejo de la Comunidad de Habla Rusa de Manhattan y el Bronx, Inc. en www.rccmb.org.

Las principales conclusiones del Informe UJA 2011 incluyen:

  • Uno de cada cinco hogares judíos en el área de Nueva York es pobre. En la ciudad de Nueva York solamente: uno de cada cuatro.
  • Uno de cada 10 hogares judíos en el área de Nueva York es casi pobre.
  • Actualmente existen casi el doble de personas viviendo en hogares judíos pobres que en 1991.
  • El 14% de los judíos pobres y el 9% de los casi pobres dicen que no pueden llegar a fin de mes, y más del 60% de ambos grupos dicen que apenas lo logran.
  • El mayor grupo de hogares judíos pobres en el área de Nueva York son los adultos mayores de habla rusa.
  • Los adultos mayores de habla rusa tienen la más alta incidencia (porcentaje) de pobreza de cualquier grupo de la comunidad judía de Nueva York.
  • Los hogares jasídicos tienen el segundo mayor número de hogares pobres y el más grande número de personas pobres. También están cerca de la cima en el número de cercanos a la pobreza.