Hot Hula and Cajun food
Venciendo la diabetes nuevamente en el Sinaí

  • English
  • Español

Hot Hula and Cajun food: Beating back diabetes at Sinai

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Anita Purcell está feliz de que no está en riesgo de padecer diabetes.

Anita Purcell is happy that she is not at risk for diabetes.

There are 25.8 million people living with diabetes in the United States.

Staggering though that figure might be, the disease’s impact in northern Manhattan is even more striking.

East Harlem has one of the highest prevalence of Type II diabetes in New York City. According to data collected in 2001 from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), residents in East Harlem were dying from diabetes at twice the rate of the rest of the city.

In response, Mount Sinai Hospital marked this past Wed., Nov. 14th with a health fair on 110th Street and Madison Avenue that drew hundreds of local residents.

The date was not coincidental – November 14th was World Diabetes Day.

As planned by organizers, the fair included free blood sugar screenings, presentations on wellness and nutrition, as well as a great deal of “fun,” not a word typically associated with diabetes.

“I wanted to put the fun first,” explained Brett Ives, a nurse practitioner at Mount Sinai’s Diabetes Center.

Mount Sinai marked World Diabetes Day with a community health fair that focused on nutrition and wellness.

Mount Sinai marked World Diabetes Day with a community health fair that focused on nutrition and wellness.

“Diabetes is a complex problem that’s not just going to be solved by medical personnel [alone],” added Ives, a chief organizer of the event.

Among the aims of the fair was providing a learning experience that equipped people with the knowledge to prevent and control the disease.

Participants enjoyed fine selections of healthy foods from neighborhood restaurants, as well as from Mount Sinai’s own kitchens.

On the menu from Mount Sinai was a salad of salmon, quinoa and kale, as engineered by Alenka Ravnik-List, a certified dietician and diabetes educator at the hospital.

The salad, thanks to the salmon, offered healthy omega-three fatty acids.

Quinoa is a grain that is also a complete protein. It is gluten free, and unlike rice and pasta, it will not be turned directly into sugar when it is digested. Kale, a hearty, leafy green, is a cornucopia of vitamins and minerals, including folic acid, which reduces the risk of strokes, and magnesium, which can prevent strokes
and heart attacks.

Alenka Ravnik-List muestra una guía de control de porciones.

“Your best line of defense is prevention,” said Alenka Ravnik-List, with a portion control guide.

“Your best line of defense is prevention,” said Ravnik-List. “It’s all about what you select, and portion size.”

And that’s where your hands come in, well, handy.

Ravnik-List explains that using your hand as a measure for the kinds of portions you should consume is an excellent idea.

For example, for dinner, you should have a palm-sized portion of meat (or other protein), only a fistful of carbohydrates, and your vegetables should be at least the length and width of your entire hand.

Also dishing out healthy food was Kevin Walters, owner of Creole Restaurant and Club on 118th Street and Third Avenue. Walters shared a Cajun chicken salad.

“It’s a healthy alternative to everything,” said Walters, explaining that those hankering for fried chicken might consider grilling their favorite poultry and throwing it on a bed of greens.

Meron Andam Ghebre Ahnas reparten comida etíope saludable.

Meron Andam and Ahnas Ghebre dish out healthy Ethiopian food.

At the next table, Meron Andam and Ahnas Ghebre were representing Massawa, an Ethiopian restaurant on 121st Street and Amsterdam Avenue.

Before them was an colorful array of healthy food: chickpeas, collard greens, lentils, and injera, a traditional Ethiopian bread made of teff, a gluten-free grain.

“There are a lot of vegetarian options, and we don’t fry anything,” said Andam. Additionally, turmeric and other spices used in Ethiopian cooking and at Massawa are good for digestion.

Andam and Ghebre were glad to see so many positive reactions to their
food.

“We’re happy to educate people about different, healthy food cultures,” said Andam.

Anita Purcell sat down to enjoy her food after getting a free blood sugar test.

Coma salmón, col rizada, y quinua para una vida saludable.

A salmon, kale, and quinoa salad was prepared by the hospital’s kitchen and served by volunteer Jeremy Rogacky.

“More people need to know that healthy food can also be delicious,” she said between bites.

She was relieved to find out that she has a balanced blood sugar reading.

“It’s good to be reassured that I’m not at risk,” she said, as she munched on vegetables.

There was no sign of starches, meat, or fried food on her plate.
Food was not the only source of fun to be had at the fair.

Maria Herminia Puno and Jasmine Chan of Hot Hula were demonstrating their moves to an interested audience. Hot Hula incorporates the dances of the Pacific Islands into a fun, low-impact exercise routine.

“It’s like a standing abdominal workout,” said Puno, whose father has diabetes. “People find it a lot of hard work, so we have to make it extremely fun to keep their mind off the intensity.”

Indeed, the dancers at Mount Sinai were distracted by the fun music and moves. The dancing was so enthralling that several passerby, including Ives, joined in.

Maria Herminia Puno y Jasmine Chan presentaron el "Hot Hula", una rutina de acondicionamiento físico, que Puno etiquetó como un "entrenamiento abdominal de pie."

Mount Sinai dances to Hot Hula, “a standing abdominal workout,” as led by instructors Maria Herminia Puno and Jasmine Chan (left).

“It’s a blast,” she said. “It had good core workout intensity.

Ives said she invited Hot Hula so people to show alternatives to traditional forms of exercise. “You don’t have to be running and jumping.”

While World Diabetes Day is only once a year, Mount Sinai’s efforts remain ongoing.

Every week it offers free dance classes for those at risk for diabetes. The classes are held at the hospital. The hour-long classes, which feature modified kick-boxing and Latin dance inspired moves, are on Tuesdays at 6:30 and Friday at 5:30.

To register for the classes, call 212.824.VIVA.

Hot Hula y comida Cajún: venciendo la diabetes nuevamente en el Sinaí

Historia y Fotos por: Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Alenka Ravnik-List muestra una guía de control de porciones.

Alenka Ravnik-List muestra una guía de control de porciones.

Hay 25.8 millones de personas viviendo con diabetes en los Estados Unidos.
Tan impresionante como dicha cifra podría ser, el impacto de la enfermedad a nivel local es aún más sorprendente.

East Harlem posee una de las cifras con mayor incidencia de diabetes tipo II en laCiudad de New York. Según los datos recaudados en el año 2001 por el Departamento de Salud e Higiene Mental (DOHMH por sus siglas en inglés), los residentes de East Harlem estaban muriendo de diabetes al doble del índice del resto de la ciudad.

En respuesta, el Hospital Mount Sinaiauspició el pasado miércoles 14 de noviembre una feria de salud en la calle 110 y la Avenida Madison, que atrajo a cientos de residentes locales.

La fecha no fue casual, el 14 de noviembre fue el Día Mundial de la Diabetes.

Meron Andam Ghebre Ahnas reparten comida etíope saludable.

Meron Andam Ghebre Ahnas reparten comida etíope saludable.

Tal como estaba previsto por los organizadores, la feria incluyó exámenes gratuitos de azúcar en la sangre, presentaciones sobre salud y nutrición, así como mucha “diversión”, una palabra no asociada típicamente con la diabetes.

“Quería poner la diversión en primer lugar,” explicó Brett Ives, un enfermero del Centro de Diabetes de Mount Sinai.

“La diabetes es un problema complejo que no sólo va a ser resuelto por el personal médico “, agregó Ives, principal organizador del evento.

Entre los objetivos de la feria estaba el proporcionar una experiencia de aprendizaje para que las personas cuenten con los conocimientos para prevenir y controlar la diabetes.

Los participantes disfrutaron de finas selecciones de alimentos saludables de restaurantes de la zona, así como de las cocinas propiasde Monte Sinaí.

En el menú del Monte Sinaí estaba una ensalada de salmón, quinoa y col rizada, diseñado por Alenka Ravnik-List, una dietista certificada y educadora de diabetes en el hospital.

Coma salmón, col rizada, y quinua para una vida saludable.

Coma salmón, col rizada, y quinua para una vida saludable.

La ensalada gracias al salmón, ofrece ácidos sanos omega tres.

La quinoa es un grano y es también una proteína completa libre de gluten, y a diferencia del arroz y la pasta, no se convierte directamente en azúcar cuando se digiere. La col rizada, unas suculentas hojas verdes, son abundantes en vitaminas y minerales, incluyendo ácido fólico, el cual reduce el riesgo de accidentes cerebrovasculares y, magnesio, que puede prevenir ataques cardíacos.

“Tu mejor defensa es la prevención”, dijo Ravnik-List.”Todo es cuestión de lo que seleccionas ydel tamaño de las porciones.”

Y ahí es donde entran tus manos, bien, muy bien.

Ravnik-List explica que usar la mano como una medida parala porción que debes consumir es una excelente idea.

Por ejemplo, para la cena, debes comer una porción de carne (u otras proteínas) del tamaño de la palma de tu mano, sólo un puñado de carbohidratos y las verduras deben ser por lo menos a lo largo y ancho de su mano entera.

También repartió comida sana Kevin Walters, propietario de Creole Restaurant and Club en la calle 118 y la Tercera Avenida. Waters compartió una ensalada de pollo cajún.

Kevin Walters del Creole Restaurant compartió la ensalada de pollo cajún, que es una "alternativa saludable a todo."

Kevin Walters del Creole Restaurant compartió la ensalada de pollo cajún, que es una “alternativa saludable a todo.”

“Es una alternativa saludable para todo”, dijo Walters, al explicar que para calmar los antojos de pollo frito puede asar su pollo favorito y arrojarlo sobre una cama de verduras.

En la mesa de al lado, Meron Andam y Ahnas Ghebre representaban a Massawa, un restaurante etíope en la calle 121 y la avenida Amsterdam.

Ante ellos estaba una colorida variedad de alimentos saludables: garbanzos, acelgas, lentejas e injera, un pan tradicional etíope hecho de teff, un cereal libre de gluten.

“Haymuchísimas opciones vegetarianas, y no freímos nada “, dijo Andam.Además, la cúrcuma y otras especias utilizadas en la cocina etíope y en Massawa son buenas para la digestión.

Andam y Ghebre se alegraron de ver tantas reacciones positivas para susalimentos.

“Estamos contentos de educar a la gente acerca de las diferentes culturas alimenticias saludables”, dijo Andam.

Anita Purcell está feliz de que no está en riesgo de padecer diabetes.

Anita Purcell está feliz de que no está en riesgo de padecer diabetes.

Anita Purcell se sentó a disfrutar de su comida después de hacerse la prueba de azúcar en la sangre de forma gratuita.

“Más gente necesita saber que la comida sana también puede ser deliciosa”, dijo entre bocado y bocado.

Se sintió aliviada al descubrir que ella tiene una lecturaequilabrada de azúcar en la sangre.

“Es bueno estar seguro de que no estoy en riesgo”, dijo, mientras comía verduras.

No había ni rastro de los almidones, carne o alimentos fritos en el plato.

La comida no era la única fuente de diversión que se tendría en la feria.

Maria Herminia Puno y Jasmine Chan de Hot Hula fueron demostrando sus movimientos a un público interesado. Hot Hula incorpora las danzas de las islas del Pacífico en una rutina divertida de ejercicio de bajo impacto.

“Es como un entrenamiento abdominal de pie”, dijo Puno, cuyo padre tiene diabetes. “a la gente le resulta como mucho trabajo duro, por lo que tenemos que hacer que sea muy divertida para mantener su mente alejada de la intensidad”.

De hecho, los bailarines en el Monte Sinaí se distrajeron por la música divertida y los movimientos. El baile era tan fascinante que varios transeúntes, entre ellos Ives, se unieron.

Maria Herminia Puno y Jasmine Chan presentaron el "Hot Hula", una rutina de acondicionamiento físico, que Puno etiquetó como un "entrenamiento abdominal de pie."

Maria Herminia Puno y Jasmine Chan presentaron el “Hot Hula”, una rutina de acondicionamiento físico, que Puno etiquetó como un “entrenamiento abdominal de pie.”

“Es muy divertido”, dijo. “Tenía una buena intensidad de entrenamiento básico”.

Ives dijo que invitó a la gente de Hot Hula para mostrar alternativas a las formas tradicionales de ejercicio. “Usted no tiene que estar corriendo y saltando.”

Aunque el Día Mundial de la Diabetes es sólo una vez al año, los esfuerzos de Mount Sinaí siguen en curso.

Cada semana ofrece clases gratuitas de baile para las personas en riesgo de padecer diabetes. Las clases se llevan a cabo en el hospital.

Las clases tienen una hora de duración y cuentan con movimientos modificados de Dick Boeing y baile latino. Se imparten los martes a las 6:30 y los viernes a las 5:30.

Para inscribirse a las clases llame al 212.824.VIVA.