From Harlem to Havana, Pastors for Peace maintain worldwide mission
De Harlem a Habana, ‘Pastores por la Paz’ mantienen misión mundial

  • English
  • Español

From Harlem to Havana, Pastors for Peace maintain worldwide mission

Story by Sandra E. García

Rev. Lucius Walker, founder of Pastors for Peace, led many humanitarian aid caravans throughout Latina America.

Rev. Lucius Walker, founder of Pastors for Peace, led many humanitarian aid caravans throughout Latina America.

Out of a whirlwind of violence was born a foundation for peace – based right in northern Manhattan.

Reverend Lucius Walker, the founding executive director of the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization (IFCO), had long found his calling.

Walker had spent decades traveling throughout Latin America and assisting people there in need as he led IFCO, which has been founded in 1967 by progressive church leaders and activists.

IFCO sought to advance the struggles of the disenfranchised, and assisted the poor in developing and sustaining community organizations to fight human and civil rights injustices throughout the world.

Walker traveled regularly to Nicaragua in the 1980’s in caravans that were filled with buses distributing everything from glasses to clothes to people in need.

Then, in 1988, Walker was injured, a result of an outbreak of violent fighting between government forces and insurgent rebels.

“In that moment, Pastors for Peace was born,” explained Walker’s daughter, Gail Walker, who was also on the same trip in Nicaragua.

“Pastors for Peace is a direct result of that attack.”

Pastors for Peace was founded as special ministry of IFCO in 1988 to provide humanitarian aid to Latin America and the Caribbean.

“In my father’s words, Pastors for Peace was supposed to be a ministry to victims of U.S. foreign policy,” adds Gail, who now serves as the organization’s co-executive director, together with Father Luis Barrios.

Dr. Melissa Barber, a Bronx native, graduated from Cuba’s Latin American School of Medicine (LASM) in 2007. “All I learned and lived there will always be with me.”

Dr. Melissa Barber, a Bronx native, graduated from Cuba’s Latin American School of Medicine (LASM) in 2007. “All I learned and lived there will always be with me.”

Based on West 145th Street, near Convent Avenue, Pastors for Peace will celebrate its 20th anniversary this July going to Cuba in caravans that will deliver goods intended to lessen the need for basic goods that exist for residents of the island.

Still, Rev. Walker’s vision, as manifested in the program, was one that would find a way to connect people committed to doing good work, beyond geographic boundaries or political ideologies.

Enter Fidel Castro.

In his speech on Sept 8, 2000 at New York City’s Riverside Church, Castro said, “We are prepared to grant a number of scholarships to poor youth who cannot afford to pay the $200,000 it costs to get a medical degree in the U.S.”

The Latin American School of Medicine (LASM) in Havana, was founded in 1998 in response to the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges.

Young people affected by the hurricanes were offered full scholarships to enroll at LASM with the condition that, once they graduated, they would return to their home countries and offer low-cost health services in their own underserved communities.

Tuition, dormitory room and board, and textbooks are free of charge.

When Rev.

Walker got word that Fidel Castro had approved 500 scholarships for U.S. Citizens to attend LASM, he moved quickly into action and began to coordinate participants.

The offer to American students was made in light of the fact that millions in the U.S. have little or no access to affordable health care; and that many young people in the United States would not think to study medicine because of the economic costs.

For these reasons, students from communities of color and low-income communities are especially encouraged to apply to the program.

Melissa Barber, born and raised in the Bronx, did just that.

“My friend knew I wanted to be a doctor, and told me about the program,” said Barber.

“The catch was the medical program was for six years, rather than 4.”

There was more, of course, her friend needed to divulge.

“It is in Cuba, and the deadline is tomorrow,” added Barber, with a laugh.

“I called the office all day long until finally a Lucius Walker picked up.

Doctors have treated people in need of medical aid everywhere, including those affected by the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

Doctors have treated people in need of medical aid everywhere, including those affected by the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

We spoke for two hours, and I didn’t know that when I was speaking to him that I was being interviewed.”

And successfully so.

Melissa Barber is a graduate of LASM, after having spent the six years in a medical program she describes as vigorous, and a country she found compelling.

“The minute I landed in Cuba, to me it felt like I was home. Since I was raised in the Bronx, it all seemed familiar,” said Dr. Barber. “And if you’ve a feel of what Harlem is like, it was just like that, a community of African Latinos.”

Feeling right at home allowed Dr. Barber to focus on her studies, which she’d need

“Our medical education and the curriculum were harder,” opined Dr. Barber as to the differences between the schooling models in the States versus LASM.

“We (Latin America Medical School Graduates) are a bit more prepared, because we spent more time in clinical.

We spend a year in internal medicine as well; you don’t get that in the States.”
And as Dr. Barber pointed out, at LASM, “you start seeing patients your first year.”

Dr. Barber graduated LASM in 2007 and is now studying for her residency exam while working part time at Pastors for Peace.

She is grateful for the training and the cultural immersion.

“Cuba is a second home to me,” she said, “and all I learned and lived there will always be with me.”
Rev.

Walker passed away in 2010 at his home in of a heart attack, just a day before he had been scheduled to be at a conference in the African nation of Angola.

His daughter Gail believes that her father’s work with IFCO and Pastors for Peace will be but one of his many legacies.

“He was not your typical 80-year-old.

I’m sure there was more he wanted to do in his life,” she said.

“He lived a long and rich life. He was a teacher, a social worker, a softball coach, a husband, a father, an uncle, a brother, a cousin.

We are a lesser world having lost him, because he was such a special person.”

Dr. Barber, who is studying for her exams while currently cares for her “amazing, beautiful 9-year-old who is autistic, and is heavily involved in a few organizations dedicated to social justice work/activism and campaigns, including Living Wage Campaign in NYC and the Poverty Initiative at Union Theological Seminar,” agrees.

“I would say Rev. Walker was my mentor, my hero, like a father,” she added. “He opened my eyes to the possibilities of a world that could exist.”

For more information on the IFCO’s Pastors for Peace ministry, its 20th anniversary humanitarian trip to Cuba this July, and its work together with LASM, please visit http://ifconews.org/ call 212.926.5757.

De Harlem a Habana, ‘Pastores por la Paz’ mantienen misión mundial

Historia por Sandra E. García

Rev. Lucius Walker, founder of Pastors for Peace, led many humanitarian aid caravans throughout Latina America.

El Reverendo Lucius Walker (izquierda) fundador de ‘Pastores por la Fe’, encabezó muchas caravanas de ayuda humanitaria a través de America Latina.

Fuera de un torbellino de violencia nació una fundación para la paz.

El Reverendo Lucius Walker, el fundador director ejecutivo de la Fundación Interreligiosa para la Organización Comunal (IFCO, pos sus siglas en inglés), durante mucho tiempo había encontrado su vocación.

Walker ha pasado décadas viajando a través de América Latina y ayudando a personas con necesidades mientras dirigía IFCO, la cual fue fundado en el 1967 por líderes religiosos progresistas y activistas.

IFCO trató de avanzar las luchas de los marginados y ayudó a los pobres a desarrollar y sostener organizaciones comunales para luchar contras las injusticias de los derechos humanos y civiles a través de todo el mundo.

Walker viajaba regularmente a Nicaragua en las caravanas del 1980 que estaban llenas de autobuses distribuyendo de todo — desde espejuelos hasta ropa — a las personas necesitadas.

Entonces en el 1988, Walker fue herido, como resultado de violentos estallidos de violencia entre las fuerzas del gobierno y los rebeldes insurgentes.

“En ese momento nació ‘Pastores por la Paz’”, explicó la hija de Walker, Gail Walker, quien también estuvo en el mismo viaje en Nicaragua.

‘Pastores por la Paz’ es un resultado directo de ese ataque”.

‘Pastores por la Paz’ fue fundado como un ministerio especial de IFCO en el 1988 para proveer ayuda humanitaria a la América Latina y al Caribe.

“En las palabras de mi padre, ‘Pastores por la Paz’ se suponía fuera un ministerio para las víctimas de la política exterior estadounidense”, añadió Gail, quien ahora sirve como la directora ejecutiva de la organización.

Dr. Melissa Barber, a Bronx native, graduated from Cuba’s Latin American School of Medicine (LASM) in 2007. “All I learned and lived there will always be with me.”

La Dra. Melissa Barber, nativa del Bronx, graduada de la Escuela de Medicina Latino Americana en Cuba (LASM, por sus siglas en inglés) en el 2007. “Todo lo que aprendí y viví ahí siempre estará conmigo”.

Basada en el oeste de la Calle 145 cerca de la Avenida Convent, ‘Pastores por la Paz’ celebrará su aniversario número 20 este julio visitando a Cuba en caravanas que entregarán artículos con la intención de disminuir las penurias de los productos básicos que existen para los residentes de la isla.

Aunque la visión del Reverendo Walker, como se manifiesta en el programa, fue una que encontraría una manera de conectar a las personas comprometidas a hacer un buen trabajo, más allá de bordes geográficos o ideologías políticas.

Entra Fidel Castro.

En su discurso el 8 de septiembre de 2000 en la Iglesia Riverside en la ciudad de Nueva York, Castro dijo, “Estamos preparados para otorgar un número de becas a jóvenes pobres que no pueden pagar el costo de $200,000 para conseguir un grado en medicina en los E.U.”.

La Escuela de Medicina Latino Americana (LASM por sus siglas en inglés) en Habana, fue fundada en el 1998 en respuesta a la devastación de los Huracanes Mitch y George.

Las personas jóvenes afectadas por los huracanes se les ofrecieron becas completas para inscribirse en LASM con la condición de que, una vez graduados, regresarían a sus países natales y ofrecerían servicios de salud a bajo costo a sus mismas comunidades menos servidas. Matrícula, alojamiento y comida, y los libros de textos eran gratis.

Cuando el Reverendo Walker supo que Fidel Castro había aprobado 500 becas para que los ciudadanos de los E.U. asistieran a LASM, se movió rápidamente y comenzó a coordinar participantes.

El ofrecimiento a los estudiantes americanos se hizo teniendo en cuenta que millones en los E.U. tienen muy poco o ningún acceso al cuidado de salud a bajo costo; y que muchos jóvenes en los Estados Unidos no pensarían estudiar medicina debido a los costos económicos.

Doctors have treated people in need of medical aid everywhere, including those affected by the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

Los doctores han tratado personas en necesidad de ayuda médica donde quiera, incluyendo aquellos afectados por el terremoto en Haití el 2010.

Por estas razones, estudiantes de comunidades de color y comunidades de bajos ingresos son especialmente animadas a aplicar al programa.

Melissa Barber, nacida y criada en el Bronx, hizo justo eso.

“Mi amiga sabía que yo deseaba ser doctora, y me dijo acerca del programa”, dijo Barber.

“Lo distinto era que el programa de medicina era por seis años en lugar de cuatro”.

Había más, claro está, que su amiga tenia que divulgar.

“Es en Cuba, y la fecha límite es mañana”, añadió Barber, con una risa.

“Llamé a la oficina todo el día hasta que finalmente Lucius Walker contestó.

Hablamos por dos horas, y yo no sabía que mientras estaba hablando con el estaba siendo entrevistada”.

Y exitosamente.

Melissa Barber es una graduada de LASM, luego de haber pasado seis años en el programa médico que describe como vigoroso, y un país que encontró convincente.

“Al momento que aterricé en Cuba, me sentí como si estuviera en casa. Ya que fue criada en el Bronx, todo me parecía familiar”, dijo la Dra. Barber.

“Y si usted siente lo que es Harlem, era justo como eso, una comunidad de latinos africanos”.

Sintiéndose justo en casa le permitió a la Dra. Barber enfocarse en sus estudios, lo cual era necesario.

“Nuestra educación médica y el currículo eran fuertes”, opinó la Dra. Barber en cuanto a las diferencias entre los modelos escolares en los estados versus LASM. “Nosotros, (los graduados en escuelas médicas latinoamericanas) estamos un poco más preparados, porque pasamos más tiempo en clínicas.

También pasamos un año en medicina interna; usted no hace eso en los estados”.

Y como la Dra. Barber señaló, en LASM “usted comienza a ver pacientes su primer año”.

La Dra. Barber se gradúo de LASM en el 2007 y ahora está estudiando para su examen de residencia mientras trabaja a medio tiempo en ‘Pastores por la Paz’.

Ella está agradecida por el entrenamiento y la inmersión cultural.

“Cuba es un segundo hogar para mi”, dijo ella, “y todo lo que aprendí y viví ahí siempre estará conmigo”.

El Reverendo Walker falleció en el 2010 en su hogar de un ataque al corazón, justo el día antes que estaba programado a ofrecer una conferencia en la nación africana de Angola.

Su hija Gail piensa que el trabajo de su padre en IFCO y ‘Pastores por la Fe’ será uno de sus muchos legados.

El programa IFCO ha ayudado a coordinar la educación médica de varios estudiantes americanos en la Escuela Latino Americana de Medicina en Cuba.

El programa IFCO ha ayudado a coordinar la educación médica de varios estudiantes americanos en la Escuela Latino Americana de Medicina en Cuba.

“El no era su típico hombre de 80 años de edad. Estoy segura de que deseaba hacer más en su vida”, dijo ella.

“Vivió una larga y próspera vida. Fue maestro, trabajador social, entrenador de softball, esposo, padre, tío, hermano, primo. Somos un mundo menor habiéndolo perdido, porque el era una persona tan especial”.

Para más información del ministerio ‘Pastores por la Fe’ de IFCO, y su viaje humanitario a Cuba este julio en su aniversario 20, y su trabajo junto a LASM, favor de visitar http://ifconews.org o llamar al 212.926.5757