Fresh, Raw, Delicious: El Rey of Tenth Avenue
Fresco, crudo, delicioso: El Rey de la Décima Avenida

  • English
  • Español

Fresh, Raw, Delicious: El Rey of Tenth Avenue

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

With Labor Day looming, and the return of school just around the corner, the thrills of outdoor living, including dining, start to fade bit by bit. For one last hurrah, we decided to revisit Bobby Fish and his fresh seafood ceviche , served road-side on 10th Avenue.

Being this close to the water in northern Manhattan might make any lover of seafood cast a longing glance at the shoreline.

Bobby Fish has been selling his trademark ceviche, the seafood dish in which raw, fresh seafood is marinated in citric juice, from his van on Tenth Avenue for over 39 years.

Bobby Fish has been selling his trademark ceviche, the seafood dish in which raw, fresh seafood is marinated in citric juice, from his van on Tenth Avenue for over 39 years.

But forget throwing a fishing line at the inlet at Inwood Hill Park, or at Dyckman Marina.

Locals know the best fresh seafood in the city is sold at a truck stand on the corner of West 207th Street and 10th Avenue.

“My son told me [they] look like a dolphin,” says Bobby Fish, pointing to a nearby handmade sign meant to be sharks eating fresh seafood. Yes, he claims his real last name is Fish.

“I feel love from people,” Bobby says about the loyal customers who have continued to return to his roadside raw bar for so many decades.

“I feel love from people,” Bobby says about the
loyal customers who have continued to return to
his roadside raw bar for so many decades.

Bobby Fish has been a roadside raw bar just a few hundred yards from the University Heights Bridge for the past 39 years. His weathered and slightly dented maroon van bears the age handsomely, with colorful handmade signs proclaiming “Bobby Fish Del Rey Ceviche.”

Inside the van is his claim to fame: the ceviche. The van is filled with deep coolers packed deep with ice and neat, plastic containers of raw fish marinating in a blend of citrus juices, chopped tomatoes, onions and spices. Bobby offers varieties of shrimp, lobster, conch, red snapper, octopus, oysters and clams.

His bestselling ceviche, Los Siete Poderes, or the Seven Powers, combines all.

And come September, if all goes as expected, Bobby Fish’s loyal customers will soon have even another option: Bobby Fish is planning on opening a restaurant on 203rd and Tenth Avenue.

Bobby said that the new restaurant and club will seat hundreds of people.  “We’re going to call it ‘The New Bobby Fish,’” he said. “But with the same old prices.”

The menu will feature his famous ceviche as well as other fish dishes with vegetables and rice and beans.

But loyal customers of the red van needn’t worry.

The van is staying put. Bobby said inspiration from above urged him to start his own business. “God told me to put the truck here and sell fish,” he said.

Today, Bobby’s van is parked next to a big gleaming white Hess gas station and across the street from a Pathmark Supermarket. But back in the early 1970’s, that spot was filled with trash and smoldering stolen cars that had been set on fire.  His wife told him he was crazy.

She said he was doing fine at the deli he had near Battery Park. Bobby, originally from Puerto Rico, had 14 children to support with only a third grade education.

But the voice was persistent. He got a peddler’s license. He swept the lot everyday and cleared away most of the debris himself. The first few years of business were rough.

Police officers insisted he moved on. People threatened him with knives. Once—on a Good Friday—someone stole $700 worth of fish from him. “But God always gave me the strength to keep going,” he said.

Every day he had to earn enough to buy at least two gallons of milk, four loaves of bread and a lot of other groceries to feed his family. He worked seven days a week, keeping his stand open 12 hours a day.

Now people come from all over to buy his citrusy ceviche.  Returning customers –some as far away as Massachusetts and Florida – constantly pull over. And instead of arguing with him, police buy lunch. The local 34th precinct asks him to prepare specialties for police events. Even if they do not pull over, people wave, honk and yell, “Hi Bobby!” from their cars.

“I feel love from people,” Bobby said.

Friends say that’s because of the love he gives back to the community. One of his closest friends and long-time customer, Barbarin Sanchez, said that Bobby has had a powerful impact on the neighborhood.

“Bobby is very generous,” Sanchez said. “He feeds homeless people and people who can’t afford to pay.” He also employs people who are new to the community and need help getting established.

“Throughout the years, a lot of people have benefitted from this business,” Sanchez said.

The ceviche, shown here, is a seafood delicacy in which fresh seafood is marinated in a blend of citrus juices, chopped tomatoes, onions and spices. Bobby offers varieties of shrimp, lobster, conch, red snapper, octopus, oysters and clams.

The ceviche, shown here, is a seafood delicacy in
which fresh seafood is marinated in a blend of
citrus juices, chopped tomatoes, onions and
spices. Bobby offers varieties of shrimp, lobster,
conch, red snapper, octopus, oysters and clams.

Antonio Camacho, originally from the Dominican Republic, has worked for Bobby for about a year. “Bobby is very charismatic,” he said. “He has a good relationship with his customers. They trust him and that’s why they come back.”

Bobby, now 60, first learned about ceviche in his youth when visiting the Mexican shores of Puerto Vallarta. The tasty treat was prepared and sold on the beach. When he asked the sellers how it was made, something clicked. He knew he could make it himself and improve on the flavor.

Bobby’s customers also love the medium hot sauce sprinkled on the fish. He said it’s his grandfather’s recipe.

Chefs and customers have offered substantial sums for his ceviche recipes and the hot sauce ingredients. Bobby has declined all offers.

You can’t buy the real secret ingredient, he said, because it’s love. His love.

Find out for yourself, head to 207th and Tenth Avenue, and look for El Rey [The King].

Bring napkins.

This piece was published on Aug. 17th, 2011.

Fresco, crudo, delicioso: El Rey de la Décima Avenida

Historia y fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

The ceviche, shown here, is a seafood delicacy in which fresh seafood is marinated in a blend of citrus juices, chopped tomatoes, onions and spices. Bobby offers varieties of shrimp, lobster, conch, red snapper, octopus, oysters and clams.

El ceviche, mostrado aquí, es marisco el cual
es marinado en una mezcla de jugos cítricos,
tomates, cebollas y especies. Bobby ofrece
variedades de camarones, langostas, caracoles,
chillos, pulpo, ostras y almejas.

Con el cierre del verano en el horizonte, El Día del Trabajo y el regreso a la escuela a la vuelta de la esquina, los gozos de vivir al aire libre comienzan a descolorarse poco a poco. Como último ¡hurra!, decidimos hablar nuevamente sobre el Rey del Ceviche, sirviendo sus platos en la misma esquina de la 10ma Avenida.

El estar tan cerca del agua podría hacer a cualquier amante de los mariscos dar una mirada a la orilla del río.

Pero olvide el tirar una línea de pescar en el Parque Inwood Hill o en la Marina Dyckman.

Los vecinos del área saben que el mejor marisco fresco en la ciudad se vende en un camión que se para en la esquina del oeste de la Calle 207 y la 10ma Avenida.

“Mi hijo me dijo que aprecian delfines”, dijo Bobby Fish, señalando un letrero hecho a mano pretendiendo ser tiburones comiendo marisco fresco. Sí, afirma que su apellido real es Fish.

Bobby Fish ha sido una barra en la calle solo a algunas yardas del Puente Universidad Heights por los pasados 39 años. Su desgastado camión carga la edad generosamente, con coloridos letreros hechos a mano diciendo “Bobby Fish el Rey del Ceviche”.

Dentro del camión está su fama: el ceviche. El camión está lleno de congeladores llenos de hielo y envases de plástico de pescado crudo marinándose en una mezcla de jugos cítricos, tomates, cebollas y especies. Bobby ofrece variedades de camarones, langostas, caracol, chillo, pulpo, ostras y almejas.

El ceviche que más vende, Los Siete Poderes, lo combina todo.

Y en septiembre, si todo va como se espera, los leales clientes de Bobby Fish pronto tendrán otra opción: Bobby Fish está planeando abrir un restaurante en la 203 y Décima Avenida.

Bobby dijo que el nuevo restaurante y club acomodaría cientos de personas. “Lo vamos a llamar “The New Bobby Fish”, dijo él. “Pero con los mismos precios viejos”.

El menú tendrá su famoso ceviche como también otros platos de pescados con vegetales y arroz y habichuelas.

“I feel love from people,” Bobby says about the loyal customers who have continued to return to his roadside raw bar for so many decades.

“Yo siento el amor de la gente”, dijo Bobby acerca de
los clientes leales que han continuado regresando a
su barra en la calle por muchas décadas.

Pero los leales clientes del rojo camión no tienen que preocuparse.

El camión se queda. Bobby dijo que inspiración desde arriba lo instó a comenzar su propio negocio. “Dios me dijo que pusiera este camión aquí y vendiera pescado”, dijo él.

Hoy, el camión de Bobby está estacionado cerca de la gran estación de gasolina Hess y al otro lado del Supermercado Pathmark. Pero a principios de la década de los 1970, ese espacio estaba lleno de basura y humeantes autos robados que habían sido incendiados. Su esposa le dijo que estaba loco.

Ella dijo que él estaba bien en el deli que tenía cerca del Parque Battery. Bobby, originalmente de Puerto Rico, tenía 14 niños que mantener con solo un tercer grado de educación.

Pero la voz fue persistente. Obtuvo la licencia de un vendedor ambulante. Barría el espacio todos los días y limpió la mayoría de la basura el mismo. Los primeros años de negocio fueron fuertes.

Los oficiales de la policía insistían en que se moviera. La gente lo amenazaba con cuchillos. Una vez un Viernes Santo – alguien le robó un valor de $700 en pescado. “Pero Dios siempre me dio la fuerza para seguir”, dijo él.

Todos los días tenía que ganar lo suficiente para comprar dos galones de leche, cuatro hogazas de pan y muchos otros alimentos para alimentar a su familia. Trabajaba siete días a la semana, manteniendo su puesto abierto 12 horas al día.

Ahora la gente viene de todos lados a comprar el cítrico ceviche. Clientes que regresan de tan lejos como Massachusetts y la Florida – van constantemente. Y en lugar de discutir con él, la policía compra almuerzo. El precinto 34 le pide preparar especialidades para eventos de la policía. Aunque no se paren, la gente saluda, toca la bocina y le grita “Hola Bobby”, desde sus autos.

“Yo siento el amor de la gente”, dijo Bobby.

La gente dice que es por el amor que él le da a la comunidad. Uno de sus amigos más cercanos y cliente por mucho tiempo, Barbarín Sánchez, dijo que Bobby ha sido un poderoso impacto en el vecindario.

“Bobby es bien generoso”, dijo Sánchez. “Él le da de comer a los desamparados y a personas que no pueden pagar”. También emplea personas que son nuevas en la comunidad y necesitan ayuda para establecerse.

Bobby Fish has been selling his trademark ceviche, the seafood dish in which raw, fresh seafood is marinated in citric juice, from his van on Tenth Avenue for over 39 years.

Bobby Fish ha estado vendiendo su ceviche
desde su camión en el oeste de la Calle 207 y la
Décima Avenida por más de 39 años.

“A través de los años, muchas personas se han beneficiado de su negocio”, dijo Sánchez.

Antonio Camacho, original de la República Dominicana, ha trabajado con Bobby por cerca de un año. “Bobby es bien carismático”, dijo él. “Tiene una buena relación con sus clientes. Confían en él y por eso regresan”.

Bobby, ahora con 60 años de edad, supo primero acerca del ceviche en su juventud cuando visitó las costas de Puerto Vallarta. La rica comida es preparada y vendida en la playa. Cuando le preguntó a los vendedores como se hacia, le dio una idea. Supo que podía hacerlo y mejorar el sabor.

Los clientes de Bobby también les encantan la salsa medio picante que le pone al pescado. Dijo que es la receta de su abuelo.

Chefs y clientes le han ofrecido cantidades substanciales por las recetas de ceviche y los ingredientes de la salsa picante. Bobby ha rechazado todas las ofertas.

Usted no puede comprar el ingrediente secreto principal, dijo él, porque es amor. Su amor. Encuéntrelo usted mismo, vaya a la 207 y Décima Avenida y busque El Rey. Lleve servilletas.

Este artículo fue publicado el 17 de agosto 2011.