Electeds, advocates seek to close zoning loopholes
Se pide cerrar las lagunas de zonificación

  • English
  • Español

Electeds, advocates seek to close zoning loopholes

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

“Don’t set a bad precedent,” said Borough President Gale Brewer.

“Don’t set a bad precedent,” said Borough
President Gale Brewer.

Ban the bad precedent.

Elected officials and advocacy groups gathered at City Hall on July 16 to demand that the city close existing loopholes that allow developers to circumvent zoning laws – and expressed concerns that such bad behavior could be repeated in neighborhoods across the city.

They called on the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) to take action by ruling against a series of loopholes, including the creation of small unbuildable lots, gerrymandering of lots, and “mechanical voids” inside buildings that allow developers to dramatically increase building height.

“These loopholes allow developers to create buildings that are two or three times higher than surrounding buildings,” said Rachel Levy, Executive Director of the Friends of the Upper East Side Historic District.

She remarked that the circumventions “make a mockery” of the city’s zoning laws and “threaten to permanently upend the character of our residential neighborhoods.”

Advocates pointed to two construction projects in particular – at 200 Amsterdam Avenue and 180 East 88th Street – where they said developers have attempted to exploit zoning laws.

“These are real issues rooted in specific buildings, but they should worry residents in any neighborhood in Manhattan,” said Jim Caras, General Counsel in the office of the Manhattan Borough President.

Caras said the East 88th Street project, a planned 32-story residential building, includes a 10-foot, unbuildable lot that allows the project to skirt zoning rules, as the developer can claim the building no longer fronts on 88th Street, allowing them to build a taller building.

“It’s like playing Whac-a-Mole with an industry that has billions to devote to coming up with new ways to circumvent the rules, and as soon as we find a way to get them to follow one rule, they come up with a new way to do it,” said City Councilmember Ben Kallos. “The creativity is limitless for trying to avoid the rules.”

“The creativity is limitless for trying to avoid the rules,” said City Councilmember Ben Kallos.

“The creativity is limitless for trying to
avoid the rules,” said City
Councilmember Ben Kallos.

Opponents of 200 Amsterdam Avenue, which will be a 668-foot residential tower, said the project carves up portions of several neighboring tax lots, essentially gerrymandering them into a zoning lot that skirts zoning laws. Sean Khorsandi, Executive Director of Landmark West!, suggested that the Department of Buildings (DOB) issued the permit for the project in error.

“The community should not have to catch the mistakes of any city agency, yet if we’re not, we’re forced to bear the brunt of the inappropriate results,” Khorsandi said.

Caras said the use of mechanical voids, the practice of using multiple empty floors in the middle of buildings, do not count against a building’s density limit and allow developers to increase building height.

“These extra void spaces, they’re giving us taller buildings, but not always with more usable space,” stated Caras. “That means no extra housing, no added economic activity for Manhattan, nothing to compensate New Yorkers for the loss of light and air. It’s the exact opposite of what these rules were intended to do.”

The City Hall rally was held in advance of a BSA hearing on July 17, where the Board was scheduled to rule on whether to allow the Amsterdam and East 88th projects to continue.

“It’s really about the BSA going on record saying we need a legislative solution. We need the zoning to change,” said Levy. “It’s also about all the other buildings coming down the pipeline that we know will start to use this tactic more and more frequently.”

“We’re forced to bear the brunt of inappropriate results,” said Landmark West’s Sean Khorsandi.

“We’re forced to bear the brunt of inappropriate
results,” said Landmark West’s Sean Khorsandi.

“We are simply asking that the BSA and the Department of Buildings make sure developers are playing by the rules that are already in the books,” said Kallos. “If these tactics continue without being checked by the city what is the point of having zoning regulations?”

At the July 17 hearing, BSA denied the community’s appeal to halt the 200 Amsterdam project.

In response, Khorsandi said that advocates were mulling legal efforts to get a preliminary injunction. He explained that opponents of the building would continue to fight for the closure of zoning loopholes and said Landmark West would also focus attention on another high-rise development proposed for 50 West 66th Street.

“In all cases, we will be holding the developers to the underlying zoning and work to ensure they follow the law,” he said.

SJP Partners, the developer behind 200 Amsterdam, issued a statement advising that the project received an “exhaustive” year-long DOB review “which reaffirmed that the zoning and building design are in compliance.”

City Planning Commission Chair Marisa Lago.

City Planning Commission Chair
Marisa Lago.

“We have the utmost confidence that the BSA will uphold the DOB’s carefully rendered decision to grant the building permit for 200 Amsterdam,” the statement said.

The BSA did not yet issue a ruling regarding 180 East 88th Street.

Levy called on Mayor Bill de Blasio to order the Department of City Planning to review all zoning loopholes that contribute to oversized development.

For his part, de Blasio has said that he is in favor of tightening the rules. “The logical answer is we should look at all the loopholes and come back with a decision,” he said during a town hall on the Upper West Side on June 27.

Also, City Planning Commission Chair Marisa Lago said in January that her committee would examine the mechanical void issue.

Brewer said that if zoning loopholes stood uncorrected, it could have a harmful effect on neighborhoods going through a rezoning, as developers would be quick to exploit building heights.

“Once you’ve set a precedent, then that will always be utilized by developers. It’s really important to stop a bad precedent before it becomes replicated,” she stated. “In Inwood, East Harlem, we haven’t seen this particular situation, but it could certainly happen. The issue is, don’t set a bad precedent because we don’t want it replicated anywhere else.”

Se pide cerrar las lagunas de zonificación

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Prohibir el mal precedente.

Funcionarios electos y grupos de defensa se reunieron en el Ayuntamiento el 16 de julio para exigir que la ciudad cierre las lagunas existentes que permiten a los desarrolladores eludir las leyes de zonificación, y expresaron su preocupación de que ese mal comportamiento pueda repetirse en vecindarios de toda la ciudad.

Hicieron un llamado a la Junta de Normas y Apelaciones (BSA, por sus siglas en inglés) de la ciudad para tomar medidas al resolver una serie de lagunas, incluida la creación de pequeños lotes no edificables, manipulación de lotes y “vacíos mecánicos” dentro de los edificios, que permiten a los desarrolladores aumentar drásticamente la altura de construcción.

“Estas lagunas permiten a los desarrolladores crear edificios que son dos o tres veces más altos que los edificios circundantes”, dijo Rachel Levy, directora ejecutiva de Amigos del Distrito Histórico del Upper East Side.

La BSA negó el llamado de la comunidad para detener el proyecto del No. 200 de Ámsterdam.

La BSA negó el llamado de la comunidad para
detener el proyecto del No. 200 de Ámsterdam.

Comentó que las elusiones “hacen una burla” de las leyes de zonificación de la ciudad y “amenazan con cambiar drástica y permanentemente la naturaleza de nuestros barrios residenciales”.

Los defensores señalaron dos proyectos de construcción en particular, en el No. 200 de la avenida Ámsterdam y el No. 180 de la calle 88 este, donde dijeron que los desarrolladores han intentado explotar las leyes de zonificación.

“Estos son problemas reales enraizados en edificios específicos, pero deberían preocupar a los residentes de cualquier vecindario de Manhattan”, dijo Jim Caras, asesor general de la oficina de la presidenta del condado de Manhattan.

Caras explicó que el proyecto de la calle 88 este, un edificio residencial planificado de 32 pisos, incluye un lote no construible de 10 pies que permite al proyecto eludir las reglas de zonificación, ya que el urbanizador puede reclamar que el edificio ya no está en la calle 88, lo que les permite construir un edificio más alto.

"Estas lagunas permiten a los desarrolladores crear edificios que son dos o tres veces más altos que los edificios circundantes", argumentó Rachel Levy.

“Estas lagunas permiten a los desarrolladores
crear edificios que son dos o tres veces más altos
que los edificios circundantes”, argumentó
Rachel Levy.

“Es como jugar Whac-a-Mole en una industria que tiene miles de millones para dedicar a idear nuevas formas de eludir las reglas, y tan pronto como encontramos una manera de hacer que sigan una regla, se les ocurre una nueva forma de eludirla”, dijo el concejal Ben Kallos. “La creatividad no tiene límites para tratar de evitar las reglas”.

Los opositores al proyecto del No. 200 de la avenida Ámsterdam, que será una torre residencial de 668 pies, dijeron que este divide porciones de varios de lotes de impuestos vecinos, esencialmente manipulándolos en un lote de zonificación que evade las leyes. Sean Khorsandi, director ejecutivo de Landmark West!, sugirió que el Departamento de Edificios (DOB, por sus siglas en inglés) emitió el permiso del proyecto por error.

“La comunidad no debería tener que detectar los errores de ninguna agencia de la ciudad, sin embargo, si no lo hacemos, nos vemos obligados a soportar el peso de los resultados inapropiados”, dijo Khorsandi.

Caras comentó que el uso de vacíos mecánicos, la práctica de usar múltiples pisos vacíos en el medio de los edificios, no cuenta contra el límite de densidad de un edificio y permite a los desarrolladores aumentar la altura.

“Estos espacios extra vacíos nos están dando edificios más altos, pero no siempre con más espacio utilizable”, declaró Caras. “Eso significa que no hay viviendas adicionales, no hay actividad económica extra para Manhattan, nada para compensar a los neoyorquinos por la pérdida de luz y aire. Es exactamente lo contrario de lo que se pretendía que hicieran estas reglas”.

"No sentar un mal precedente", dijo la presidenta del condado, Gale Brewer.

“No sentar un mal precedente”, dijo la
presidenta del condado, Gale Brewer.

La manifestación del Ayuntamiento se llevó a cabo antes de una audiencia de la BSA el 17 de julio, donde estaba programado que la Junta decidiera si permitía o no que los proyectos de Ámsterdam y la 88 este, continúen.

“Realmente se trata de que la BSA quede registrada diciendo que necesitamos una solución legislativa. Necesitamos que la zonificación cambie”, dijo Levy. “También se trata de que todos los demás edificios similares sepamos que comenzarán a usar esta táctica cada vez más frecuentemente”.

“Simplemente estamos pidiendo que la BSA y el Departamento de Edificios se aseguren de que los desarrolladores sigan las reglas que ya están en los libros”, dijo Kallos. “Si estas tácticas continúan sin ser controladas por la ciudad, ¿de qué sirve tener regulaciones de zonificación?”.

En la audiencia del 17 de julio, la BSA negó la apelación de la comunidad para detener el proyecto del No. 200 de Ámsterdam.

En respuesta, Khorsandi dijo que los defensores reflexionarán sobre los esfuerzos legales para obtener un mandato preliminar. Explicó que los opositores del edificio continuarán luchando por el cierre de las lagunas de zonificación y dijo que Landmark West! también se centraría en otro desarrollo de gran altura propuesto para el No. 50 de la Calle 66 oeste.

“En todos los casos, tendremos a los desarrolladores en la zonificación subyacente y trabajaremos para garantizar que cumplan con la ley”, dijo.

SJP Partners, los desarrolladores detrás del No. 200 de Ámsterdam, emitieron un comunicado que informa que el proyecto recibió una “exhaustiva” revisión del DOB de un año de duración “que reafirmó que el diseño de zonificación y de construcción están en conformidad”.

“Tenemos la máxima confianza de que la BSA defenderá la decisión -cuidadosamente tomada- del DOB de otorgar el permiso de construcción para el No. 200 de Ámsterdam”, dijo el comunicado.

La BSA aún no emitió una resolución respecto al No. 180 de la calle 88 este.

"La creatividad no tiene límites para tratar de evitar las reglas", dijo el concejal Ben Kallos.

“La creatividad no tiene límites para
tratar de evitar las reglas”, dijo el
concejal Ben Kallos.

Levy pidió al alcalde Bill de Blasio ordenar al Departamento de Planificación Urbana revisar todas las lagunas de zonificación que contribuyen al desarrollo sobredimensionado.

Por su parte, de Blasio ha dicho que está a favor de ajustar las reglas. “La respuesta lógica es que deberíamos mirar todas las lagunas y volver con una decisión”, comentó durante una reunión del ayuntamiento en el Upper West Side el 27 de junio.

Además, la presidenta de la Comisión de Planificación Urbana, Marisa Lago, dijo en enero que su comité examinaría el problema del vacío mecánico.

Brewer señaló que si las lagunas de zonificación no se corrigen, podría tener un efecto nocivo en los vecindarios que están pasando por una rezonificación, ya que los desarrolladores podrían explotar rápidamente las alturas de los edificios.

“Una vez que se ha establecido un precedente, los desarrolladores lo utilizarán siempre. Es realmente importante detener un mal precedente antes de que se replique”, afirmó. “En Inwood, East Harlem, no hemos visto esta situación en particular, pero sin duda podría suceder. El tema es evitar sentar un mal precedente porque no queremos que se replique en otro lugar”.