Decision Time
Tiempos decisivos

  • English
  • Español

Decision Time

Story by Erik Cuello, Gregg McQueen, Sherry Mazzocchi, and Joseph Perreaux

At press time, with 99.6 percent of the returns accounted for, Rangel led Espaillat 47.6 percent to 43.6 percent.  Pastor Michael Walrond received approximately 8 percent of the vote.

In the 2012 primary campaign, Rangel squeaked out a narrow victory over Espaillat in a race where the results took two weeks to finalize.

Perhaps buoyed by that recollection, Espaillat was not yet ready to concede defeat in 2014 late on Tuesday evening.

“As we learned in 2012, every single vote needs to be counted in this race,” said Espaillat in a statement.

“Given the thousands of votes outstanding, the people of Upper Manhattan and The Bronx deserve a full accounting of every vote to achieve a complete and accurate tally in this race.” 

Voter signC(web)

After a hotly contested campaign, the Congressional race in the 13th District, which is comprised of Northern Manhattan and a portion of the Bronx, finally reached the end of its road as the Democratic Primary was held this past Tues., Jun. 24th. The Manhattan Times spoke with voters, poll workers, and the principal candidates, the incumbent Rep. Charles Rangel and State Senator Adriano Espaillat throughout the day.

“We’re moving forward”

by Gregg McQueen

Adriano Espaillat

In Inwood, State Senator Adriano Espaillat cast his personal vote at his polling site at PS 98 at about 10:00 a.m., followed by a crush of reporters and camera crews.

He was accompanied by his family, including his mother, Melba Espaillat, his son, Adriano Espaillat, Jr., and his four-month-old grandson, Ulises.

Espaillat greets press 2C(web)Espaillat stopped to hug and kiss Ulises before filling out his paper ballot, and then gave a thumbs-up after using the electronic scanner.

Outside the school, Espaillat told reporters that the time had come to vote for change.

“This is a district that has been ignored by Washington for far too long,” said Espaillat.

He cited income inequality and immigration reform as key issues facing people of the 13th District.

“I believe that the people of this community will rise and vote for change.”

Espaillat said he had “great respect” for his primary foe Charles Rangel but added, “He’s part of the past and we’re part of the future. We’re moving forward.”

Con Curry

Con CurryC(web)Inwood resident Con Curry was moved by Espaillat’s call for change in Washington.

“It’s time for Rangel to go. We need new blood,” stated Curry.

Jessie Smith, 99 years old and a resident of Park Terrace Gardens, was brought to the voting site in her wheelchair by her son Russell to cast a vote for Espaillat.

“She’s been in this neighborhood since 1965,” said her son Russell.  “She’s very enthusiastic about politics and never misses an election.”

Ayumi Tomari

DSC_2811(web)Ayumi Tomari said she voted for Espaillat because he will be responsive to the needs of Inwood, since he lives in the community himself.

“Espaillat is one of us; he has a family in this neighborhood.”
Tomari, who is the mother of a special needs child, said she wanted to elect a candidate who supported programs and services for children.

“I need someone who is going to fight for the families in this area,” remarked Tomari.

“And how can we support Rangel?  I don’t think I’ve ever seen him in this neighborhood.”

Bienvenida Vargas

Voter Bienvida VargasC(web)“He’s better than Rangel for the people in this neighborhood,” agreed voter Bienvenida Vargas.

Daniel Boncenoor

Daniel BoncenoorC(web)Daniel Boncenoor explained that Espaillat is better equipped to serve the needs of the Hispanic community.

“We need someone with new ideas, and preferably someone who can relate better to our culture,” said Boncenoor.

“I respect Rangel, but he’s been in his seat too long,” he added.  “Espaillat is the one for the future.”

Though Espaillat seemed to garner heavy support among Inwood voters, there were some uptowners backing Rangel.

“I don’t trust Espaillat,” said Zelda, who resides on the corner of Dyckman Street and Broadway.

“Dyckman has become a nightmare with the nightlife, and Espaillat has allowed that situation to fester.”

Some voters refused to reveal which candidate they were backing, but recognized the importance of getting out to vote.

“There is a lot at stake in this election,” said Ann Chase.  “It’s important that we make the right decision since it affects our daily lives.”

Curry remarked that she thought all three candidates were strong, but did lodge one objection.

“We need more females in Congress,” she said.

VoteC(web)

For poll workers, these are long days.

Shana Filion, a volunteer at PS 98 polling site, said that her crew started the day at 5 a.m. and would finish well after 9 p.m.

In addition to the long days, volunteers are often confronted with malfunctioning scanners or confused voters who need help navigating the process.

Some workers appreciated the move to the optical scanners instead of the antiquated lever machines.

“I like these scanners better,” said Lorraine Perry, volunteer coordinator at PS 98 site.  “They work well, and at the end of the night everything is automatically counted.”

But at the PS 52 site on Broadway, things were not as rosy.

Two of the site’s four scanners broke down in the late morning, forcing a bottleneck of voters to endure an extended wait to vote.

Site coordinator Rafael Rodríguez said that one machine malfunctioned when a voter filled in the boxes for all three candidates.

“The machine is supposed to recognize that and spit out the ballot, but instead it just got stuck,” said Rodríguez, who needed to call a technician from the Board of Elections to resolve the situation.

Rodriguez summed up the day in one word: “Hectic.”

One poll volunteer at PS 52 voiced concern that there were too few Spanish-speaking poll workers to handle the predominantly Hispanic district, an issue that caused controversy during the 2012 primary.

“There are only two Spanish speakers on site,” she commented.  “That’s not enough.”

“One hell of a mistake”

By Erik Cuello

DSC_3602C(web)The incumbent cast his ballot at PS 175 in Harlem around 9:30 a.m., looking to win re-election to his 23rd term.

But he made clear it would be the final run.

“I told my wife of over 50 years that this would be the last time I will be voting for myself,” said Rangel.

But he was also adamant that he still had the energy to represent the district, which he has done since 1971, despite the loss of previous support.

“People didn’t support me this time, not because I wasn’t the best qualified and this is so important, they didn’t support me because they thought it wasn’t in their best future interests not to support me,” said Rangel.

“They’ve made one hell of a mistake.”

“I trust his execution”

7000 handing out Rangel flyers(web)There was a slow but steady trickle of voters at P.S. 173 on Ft. Washington Ave. not long after the polls opened at 6:00 a.m.

Dalenia Checo said she voted for Sen. Adriano Espaillat. “Hispanic people need a representative for new schools, new apartments, lower rents and better jobs,” she said.

José Robinson

7002 Jose Robinson voted for Rangel(web)José Robinson voted for incumbent Assemblymen Charles Rangel. “I like the guy. He’s been working for a long time—40 some years. What if the new guy doesn’t do a good job?”

A young woman who declined to give her name said that she voted for Espaillat. “At this point Rangel has been there so many years. He should be looking at retirement. It’s time for a change.”

Another man said he voted for Rangel. “I trust his execution and ability to maneuver things.”

Timothy Johnson voted for Rangel. “I thought he was better than the other candidate.”

Johnson was joined by another woman, who said she too voted for Rangel. “The rent is too high. He’s better than Espaillat.”

Luz voted for Espaillat. “He’s part of our community. We need fresh blood. The other guy has been there too long.”

Luz’s son Jason is 19 and cast his first ballot today. “I voted for Adriano. I met him once. He’s a really nice guy. He’s suitable for a job in Congress. We need somebody.” He also agreed with his mother that Rangel has been in office too long. “It’s like the Bloomberg situation.”

“I hope I earn your vote”

By Gregg McQueen

Later in the afternoon, Espaillat appeared relaxed as school let out and he greeted voters outside of IS 187 in Washington Heights, even stopping to playfully toss a football with a young boy.

“I’m feeling very good,” he remarked.  “Very optimistic and strong.”

Espaillat said he felt tremendous support for his campaign during his uptown stops throughout the day.

“People want change, and I think we’re on our way to a big victory today,” he said

Espaillat enthusiastically shook hands with people outside of the polling site.

“I hope I earn your vote,” Espaillat told one woman.

“I hope so too,” she replied.  “Because I just voted for you.”

Although Espaillat appeared to dominate voter support in his home neighborhood of Inwood, backing for others in the field, including the incumbent Rangel, seemed to rise slightly further south.

Milady Cabrera

Voter Milady Cabrera 2C(web)Milady Cabrera, a Dominican who has resided Washington Heights resident for 37 years, said she didn’t think had accomplished enough in his career to merit her vote.

“I’m voting for Rangel,” she said.  “Even though I’m Hispanic, I’d still prefer Rangel due to his experience.

Walrond supporters Cherry-Ann Jack, Whiney Dumeng and Kercena Dozier.

Walrond supporters Cherry-Ann Jack, Whiney Dumeng and Kercena DozierC(web)Pastor Michael A. Walrond, who lacked campaign volunteers stumping for votes in Inwood, had some supporters outside of IS 187.

Cherry-Ann Jack, a Walrond backer, said that the candidate was a “visionary activist who is engaged in programs that help his community.”

Though Walrond isn’t as well known Rangel or Espaillat, she said, he has people who are working hard to gain votes for him.

“We’re all volunteers with Walrond,” said Jack. “We’re real supporters.”

Tiempos decisivos

Historia por Erik Cuello, Gregg McQueen, Sherry Mazzocchi y Joseph Perreaux

Voter signC(web)Después de una campaña muy reñida, la carrera del congreso en el distrito 13, compuesto por el norte de Manhattan y una parte del Bronx, finalmente llegó a su fin con la celebración de las primarias demócratas el pasado martes 24 de junio. The Manhattan Times habló con los votantes, empleados electorales y los principales candidatos, el titular representante Charles Rangel y el senador estatal Adriano Espaillat, durante todo el día.

“Estamos avanzando”

Por Gregg McQueen

Adriano Espaillat

Espaillat greets press 2C(web)En Inwood, el senador estatal Adriano Espaillat emitió su voto personal en el lugar de votación correspondiente, la PS 98, a las 10:00 de la mañana, seguido de una multitud de reporteros y camarógrafos.

Estuvo acompañado por su familia, incluyendo a su madre, Melba Espaillat; su hijo, Adriano Espaillat, Jr.; y su nieto de cuatro meses de edad, Ulises.

Espaillat se detuvo para abrazar y besar a Ulises antes de llenar su papeleta y después, mostró un pulgar en señal de victoria luego de usar el escáner electrónico.

Afuera de la escuela Espaillat dijo a los reporteros que había llegado el momento de votar por el cambio.

“Este es un distrito que ha sido ignorado por Washington durante mucho tiempo”, dijo Espaillat.

Se refirió la desigualdad de ingresos y la reforma migratoria como temas clave que enfrenta la gente del distrito 13.

“Creo que la gente de esta comunidad se levantará y votará por el cambio”.

Espaillat dijo tener “gran respeto” por su enemigo principal, Charles Rangel, pero agregó: “Él es parte del pasado y nosotros somos parte del futuro. Estamos avanzando”.

Con Curry

Con CurryC(web)La residente de Inwood Con Curry, se conmovió por el llamado de Espaillat por un cambio en Washington.

“Es hora de que Rangel se vaya. Necesitamos sangre nueva”, dijo ella.

Jessie Smith, de 99 años de edad y residente de Park Terrace Gardens, fue llevada al lugar de votación en su silla de ruedas por su hijo Russell para emitir un voto a favor de Espaillat.

“Ella ha estado en este barrio desde 1965”, dijo su hijo Russell. “Ella es muy entusiasta acerca de la política y nunca se pierde una elección”.

Ayumi Tomari

DSC_2811(web)Ayumi Tomari dijo que votó por Espaillat porque va a responder a las necesidades de Inwood, ya que vive en la comunidad.

“Espaillat es uno de nosotros, tiene una familia en este barrio”.

Tomari, quien es la madre de un niño con necesidades especiales, dijo que quería elegir a un candidato que apoye los programas y servicios para niños.

“Necesito a alguien que luche por las familias de esta área”, remarcó Tomari.

“¿Cómo podemos apoyar a Rangel? No creo que jamás lo haya visto en este barrio”.

Bienvenida Vargas

Voter Bienvida VargasC(web)“Es mejor que Rangel para la gente en este barrio”, coincidió la votante Bienvenida Vargas.

Daniel Boncenoor

Daniel BoncenoorC(web)Daniel Boncenoor explicó que Espaillat está mejor equipado para atender las necesidades de la comunidad hispana.

“Necesitamos a alguien con nuevas ideas y, de preferencia, a alguien que pueda relacionarse mejor con nuestra cultura”, dijo Boncenoor.

“Yo respeto a Rangel, pero ha estado en su lugar demasiado tiempo”, agregó. “Espaillat es ideal para el futuro”.

Aunque Espaillat parecía conseguir un fuerte apoyo entre los votantes de Inwood, hubo algunos del norte del condado respaldando a Rangel.

“No confío en Espaillat”, dijo Zelda, quien reside en la esquina de la calle Dyckman y Broadway.

“Dyckman se ha convertido en una pesadilla con la vida nocturna, y Espaillat ha permitido que la situación se complique”.

Algunos votantes se negaron a revelar a cuál candidato respaldaban, pero reconocieron la importancia de salir a votar.

“Hay mucho en juego en esta elección”, dijo Ann Chase. “Es importante que tomemos la decisión correcta ya que afecta nuestra vida cotidiana”.

Curry remarcó que piensa que los tres candidatos son fuertes, pero sí tuvo una objeción: “Necesitamos más mujeres en el Congreso”, dijo.

 

VoteC(web)Para los empleados electorales, estos son días largos.

Shana Filion, voluntaria en el sitio de votación de la PS 98, dijo que su equipo comenzó el día a las 5 de la mañana y terminaría bien pasadas las  9 p.m.

Además de los largos días, los voluntarios se enfrentan a menudo con los escáneres que funcionan mal o con votantes confundidos que necesitan ayuda para navegar el proceso.

Algunos trabajadores agradecieron el cambio a los escáneres ópticos en lugar de las anticuadas máquinas de palanca.

“Me gustan más estos escáneres”, dijo Lorraine Perry, coordinadora de voluntarios en el sitio de votación de la PS 98.

“Funcionan bien y al final de la noche todo se cuenta automáticamente”.

Pero en el sitio de la PS 52, en Broadway, las cosas no fueron tan halagüeñas.

Dos de los cuatro escáneres del sitio se descompusieron a media mañana, provocando un cuello de botella de los votantes, quienes soportaron una larga espera para emitir su voto.

El coordinador del sitio, Rafael Rodríguez, dijo que una máquina no funcionó cuando un votante votó por los tres candidatos.

“La máquina debe reconocer eso y escupir la boleta, en cambio, simplemente se atascó”, dijo Rodríguez, quien tuvo que llamar a un técnico de la Junta Electoral para resolver la situación.

Rodríguez resumió el día en una sola palabra: “agitado”.

Una voluntaria en la PS 52 expresó su preocupación de que había muy pocos empleados electorales de habla hispana para manejar un barrio predominantemente hispano, un tema que causó controversia durante las primarias del 2012.

“Sólo hay dos hispanoparlantes en el sitio”, comentó. “Eso no es suficiente”.

“Un tremendo error”

Por Erik Cuello

DSC_3602C(web)El titular emitió su voto en la PS 175, en Harlem, alrededor de las 9:30 am, buscando ganar la reelección en su periodo 23°.

Pero dejó claro que sería la última carrera.

“Le dije a mi mujer de más de 50 años que esta será la última vez que vote por mí, dijo Rangel.

Pero también insistió en que todavía tiene la energía para representar al distrito, lo que ha hecho desde 1971, a pesar de la pérdida de apoyo previo.

“La gente no me apoyó en esta ocasión no porque yo no sea el mejor cualificado y esto sea tan importante, no me apoyaron porque pensaron que no estaba en sus mejores intereses futuros el apoyarme”, dijo Rangel.

“Ha sido un tremendo error”.

“Confío en su ejecución”

Por Sherry Mazzocchi

7000 handing out Rangel flyers(web)Repartiendo volantes de Rangel.

Hubo un lento, pero constante, flujo de votantes en la PS 173 -en la avenida Ft. Washington- no mucho después de que las urnas abrieron a las 6:00 de la mañana.

Dalenia Checo dijo que votó por el senador Adriano Espaillat. “Los hispanos necesitan un representante para nuevas escuelas, nuevos departamentos, rentas más bajas y mejores puestos de trabajo”, dijo.

José Robinson

7002 Jose Robinson voted for Rangel(web)José Robinson votó por el titular asambleísta Charles Rangel. “Me gusta el tipo. Él ha estado trabajando durante mucho tiempo, 40 y tantos años. ¿Qué pasa si el chico nuevo no hace un buen trabajo?”.

Una mujer joven que prefirió no dar su nombre, dijo que ella votó a favor de Espaillat. “Rangel ha estado ahí por muchos años, él debería estar pensando en su retiro. Es hora de un cambio”.

Otro hombre dijo que votó a favor de Rangel. “Confío en su ejecución y su habilidad para maniobrar las cosas”.

Timothy Johnson votó por Rangel. “Pensé que era mejor que el otro candidato”.

A Johnson se le unió otra mujer que dijo que ella también votó a favor de Rangel. “La renta es demasiado alta. Es mejor que Espaillat”.

Luz votó por Espaillat. “Es parte de nuestra comunidad. Necesitamos sangre nueva. El otro tipo ha estado ahí demasiado tiempo”.

El hijo de Luz, Jason, tiene 19 años y emitió su primer voto hoy. “Voté por Adriano. Lo conocí una vez. Él es un tipo muy agradable. Es adecuado para un puesto de trabajo en el Congreso. Necesitamos a alguien”. También estuvo de acuerdo con su madre en que Rangel ha estado en el cargo por mucho tiempo. “Es como la situación Bloomberg”.

“Espero merecer su voto”

Por Gregg McQueen

Por la tarde, Espaillat apareció relajado mientras la escuela lo liberó y saludó a los votantes afuera de IS 187 en Washington Heights, incluso se detuvo a jugar fútbol con un niño.

“Me siento muy bien”, remarcó. “Muy optimista y fuerte”.

Espaillat dijo que sintió un gran apoyo a su campaña en sus paradas en el norte del condado durante todo el día.

“La gente quiere un cambio y creo que vamos en camino a una gran victoria hoy”, dijo Espaillat estrechó con entusiasmo las manos de las personas que estaban afuera del sitio de votación.

“Espero merecer su voto”, dijo Espaillat a una mujer.

“Yo también lo espero”, respondió ella. “Porque acabo de votar por usted”.

Aunque Espaillat pareció dominar el apoyo de los votantes en su barrio natal de Inwood, el respaldo hacia otros en la contienda, incluyendo al titular Rangel, parecía elevarse ligeramente más al sur.

Milady Cabrera

Voter Milady Cabrera 2C(web)Milady Cabrera, dominicana que ha residido en Washington Heights durante 37 años, dijo que no creía que Espaillat había logrado lo suficiente en su carrera como para merecer su voto.

“Voy a votar por Rangel”, dijo ella. “Aunque soy hispana, prefiero a Rangel debido a su experiencia”.

Simpatizantes de Walrond: Cherry-Ann Jack, Whiney Dumeng y Kercena Dozier.

Walrond supporters Cherry-Ann Jack, Whiney Dumeng and Kercena DozierC(web)El pastor Michael A. Walrond, quien careció de promotores voluntarios que hicieran campaña para promover su voto en Inwood, tuvo algunos partidarios afuera de IS 187.

Cherry-Ann Jack, simpatizante de Walrond, dijo que el candidato era un “activista visionario dedicado a programas que ayudan a su comunidad”.

Aunque Walrond no es tan bien conocido como Rangel o Espaillat, dijo ella, tiene gente que está trabajando duro para ganar votos para él.

“Todos somos voluntarios de Walrond”, dijo Jack. “Somos partidarios de verdad”.