Centered on a cure
Centrados en una cura

  • English
  • Español

Centered on a cure

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

Of the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease is the only one that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed.

More than five million American suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, which creates problems with memory and behavior, and causes patients to struggle with routine daily tasks.

At Columbia University Medical Center’s Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain, investigators are working hard to one day change that.

CUMC-LogowebThe institute operates as an independent research wing of Columbia University, and sponsors Alzheimer’s-related projects with other departments across campus.

Operating under Taub’s umbrella is Columbia’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC), which provides an infrastructure for research studies and promotes patient outreach, recruitment and education.

“We foster collaboration between researchers not only across Columbia, but around the entire world,” said ADRC Director Scott Small, MD, Boris and Rose Katz Professor of Neurology.

"Hundreds of investigators have been influenced by work that we've been doing," said ADRC Director Scott Small, MD, Boris and Rose Katz Professor of Neurology.

“Hundreds of investigators have been influenced by work that we’ve been doing,” said ADRC Director Scott Small, MD, Boris and Rose Katz Professor of Neurology.

“Easily, hundreds of investigators have been influenced by work that we’ve been doing at the center,” he said.

Substantial scientific research on the disease only began in the late part of the 20th century, explained Small.

“The major developments in this field are all relatively new,” he remarked.

“Our main goals are learning to distinguish Alzheimer’s from normal aging, and to try to diagnose the disease as early as possible,” added Small.

Columbia’s ADRC was founded 25 years ago when two noted researchers, Dr. Richard Mayeux and Dr. Michael Shelanski, combined different approaches — epidemiological and cell biological — to investigate Alzheimer’s disease and related neurological degenerative disorders.

“Simply looking at environmental factors can only take you so far,” said Michael Shelanski, MD, Co-Director of the Taub Institute and Delafield Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology. “We had to combine the epidemiology and genetics.”

Since 1989, Mayeux has led the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging Project, which investigates rates and risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease among elderly individuals of African-American and Caribbean Hispanic descent.

Dr. Richard Mayeux has led the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging Project since 1989.

Dr. Richard Mayeux has led the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging Project since 1989.

“It’s important to assemble the proper populations to study,” said Shelanski. “Dominicans tend to have extended families, so they are ideal.”

The ADRC has been able to set up family studies with locals that include their relatives in the Dominican Republic.

“Much of our current knowledge of risk factors was derived from those studies,” said Shelanski.

To facilitate research, the Taub Institute maintains an expansive brain bank that houses brains from more than 5,000 donors with neurodegenerative diseases.

“Having ready access to those samples is essential to our research,” said Shelanski.

The ADRC is responsible for numerous important research findings over the years, including a Shelanski-led study that demonstrated that a protein called caspase-2 is a key regulator of a signaling pathway that leads to cognitive decline.

The findings of that study, made in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s, suggest that inhibiting this protein could prevent the neuron damage and subsequent cognitive decline associated with the disease.

In 2006, another ADRC study showed that increasing the amount of a specific brain enzyme partially restored memory in a mouse model.

“If you make an Alzheimer’s model in a mouse, we could cure it,” said Shelanski. “But we think that mice only mimic the early phases of the disease.”

Michael Shelanski, MD, is Co-Director of the Taub Institute and Delafield Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology.

Michael Shelanski, MD, is Co-Director of the Taub Institute and Delafield Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology.

In 2013, a team of Columbia researchers, led by Nobel laureate Eric R. Kandel, MD, found that deficiency of a protein in the hippocampus is a significant contributor to age-related memory loss and that this form of memory loss is reversible.

That study offered strong evidence that age-related memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease are distinct conditions, said Small.

“For a long time, many people thought that Alzheimer’s memory loss might just be a normal function of aging,” he said. “That was the first study that demonstrated that they are different.”

Small explained that ADRC investigators have been at the forefront of identifying genetic links and risk factors for Alzheimer’s, using animal models and employing imaging techniques to pinpoint the earliest brain sites affected by the disease.

Through MRI imaging of both human patients and mice models, members of Small’s team were able to clarify what section of the brain Alzheimer’s starts in, and how the disease spreads.

“It makes sense that if Alzheimer’s starts in an isolated part of the brain and then spreads, then the earlier you could treat it, the better off patients will be,” said Small.

taubandbrainwebMore recently, ADRC investigators have begun developing novel therapeutic interventions.

“We have not yet had that breakthrough moment that leads to a cure, but there is healthy sense of optimism that it’s on the horizon,” remarked Small.

Advances in diagnostic imaging have made it easier to detect Alzheimer’s, but tests are not easily available to the general population.

“Advanced scanning technology is superb but extremely expensive,” said Shelanski. “It’s not feasible to do it everywhere, especially in small communities.”

“The holy grail would be to eventually have a blood test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s,” he stated.

“Ideally, yes, we will one day be able to do screening on everyone,” agreed Small. “But it has to be feasible to truly perform it on everyone, not just those who have access to better medical resources.”

For more information on the Taub Institute or Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Columbia University Medical Center, go to www.cumc.columbia.edu/dept/taub/ and cumc.columbia.edu/adrc/.

Centrados en una cura

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

De las diez principales causas de muerte en los Estados Unidos, la enfermedad del Alzheimer es la única que no se puede prevenir, curar o retrasar.

Más de cinco millones de estadounidenses sufren de la enfermedad del Alzheimer, la cual crea problemas con la memoria y el comportamiento, y hace que los pacientes luchen con las tareas rutinarias diarias.

En el Instituto Taub del Centro Médico Universitario Columbia para la Investigación sobre la enfermedad del Alzheimer y el envejecimiento cerebral, los investigadores están trabajando duro para algún día cambiar eso.

El instituto funciona como un ala independiente de investigación de la Universidad Columbia, y patrocina proyectos relacionados con el Alzheimer con otros departamentos a través del campus.

Operando bajo el paraguas de Taub está el Centro de Investigación de enfermedades del Alzheimer de Columbia (ADRC por sus siglas en inglés), que proporciona una infraestructura para estudios de investigación y promueve el alcance del paciente, su reclutamiento y educación.

“Fomentamos la colaboración entre los investigadores no sólo en Columbia sino en el mundo entero”, dijo el director de ADRC, Scott Small, MD, profesor Boris y Rose Katz de Neurología.

"Hundreds of investigators have been influenced by work that we've been doing," said ADRC Director Scott Small, MD, Boris and Rose Katz Professor of Neurology.

“Cientos de investigadores han sido influenciados por el trabajo que hemos estado haciendo”, dijo el director del ADRC, Scott Small, MD, profesor Boris y Rose Katz de Neurología.

“Fácilmente, cientos de investigadores han sido influenciados por el trabajo que hemos estado haciendo en el centro”, dijo.

La investigación científica sustancial sobre la enfermedad sólo se inició en la última parte del siglo XX, explicó Small.

“Los principales avances en este campo son todos relativamente nuevos”, remarcó.

“Nuestros principales objetivos son: aprender a distinguir la enfermedad de Alzheimer del envejecimiento normal y tratar de diagnosticar la enfermedad lo antes posible”, añadió Small.

ADRC de Columbia fue fundado hace 25 años, cuando dos destacados investigadores, el Dr. Richard Mayeux y el Dr. Michael Shelanski, combinaron diferentes enfoques -epidemiológico y de células biológicas- para investigar la enfermedad del Alzheimer y los trastornos neurológicos degenerativos relacionados.

“Solamente observar los factores ambientales puede llevarte hasta cierto punto”, dijo Michael Shelanski, MD, codirector del Instituto Taub y profesor Delafield de Patología y Biología Celular. “Tuvimos que combinar la epidemiología y la genética”.

Dr. Richard Mayeux has led the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging Project since 1989.

El Dr. Richard Mayeux ha dirigido el proyecto de envejecimiento de la comunidad Washington Heights-Inwood desde 1989.

Desde 1989, Mayeux lidera el proyecto de envejecimiento de la comunidad de Washington Heights-Inwood, que investiga los índices y los factores de riesgo de la enfermedad del Alzheimer entre las personas de edad avanzada de ascendencia hispana, afroamericana y caribeña.

“Es importante reunir las poblaciones adecuadas para el estudio”, dijo Shelanski. “Los dominicanos tienden a tener familias numerosas, por lo que son ideales”.

El ADRC ha podido llevar a cabo estudios familiares con población local que incluye a sus familiares en la República Dominicana.

“Gran parte de nuestro conocimiento actual de los factores de riesgo se deriva de esos estudios”, dijo Shelanski.

Para facilitar la investigación, el Instituto Taub mantiene un amplio banco de cerebros que alberga cerebros de más de 5,000 donantes con enfermedades neurodegenerativas.

“Tener acceso inmediato a esas muestras es esencial para nuestra investigación”, dijo Shelanski.

El ADRC es responsable de numerosos hallazgos importantes de investigación en los últimos años, incluyendo un estudio dirigido por Shelanski que demostró que una proteína llamada caspasa-2 es un regulador clave de una vía que es un síntoma que conduce a la disminución cognitiva.

Los resultados de ese estudio, realizado en un ratón modelo con la enfermedad del Alzheimer, sugieren que el inhibir esta proteína podría prevenir el daño neuronal y el deterioro cognitivo posterior asociado con la enfermedad.

taubandbrainwebEn 2006, otro estudio del ADRC mostró que aumentar la cantidad de una enzima específica del cerebro restauraba parcialmente la memoria en un ratón modelo.

“Si usted hace un modelo de Alzheimer en un ratón, podríamos curarlo”, dijo Shelanski. “Pero creemos que los ratones que sólo imitan las primeras fases de la enfermedad”.

En 2013, un equipo de investigadores de Columbia, encabezados por el premio Nobel Eric Kandel R., MD, encontró que la deficiencia de una proteína en el hipocampo es un contribuyente significativo a la pérdida de memoria relacionada con la edad, y que esta forma de pérdida de memoria es reversible.

Ese estudio ofreció evidencia sólida de que la pérdida de memoria relacionada con la edad y la enfermedad del Alzheimer son condiciones distintas, dijo Small.

“Durante mucho tiempo, mucha gente pensó que la pérdida de memoria del Alzheimer podría ser una función normal del envejecimiento”, dijo. “Ese fue el primer estudio que demostró que son diferentes”.

AlzheimerswebSmall explicó que los investigadores del ADRC han estado a la vanguardia en la identificación de los vínculos genéticos y los factores de riesgo para la enfermedad del Alzheimer, utilizando animales como modelos y empleando técnicas de imagen para determinar las zonas cerebrales que se ven afectadas primero por la enfermedad.

A través de imágenes de resonancia magnética tanto de pacientes humanos como de ratones modelo, los miembros del equipo de Small pudieron aclarar en qué sección del cerebro comienza la enfermedad del Alzheimer, y cómo se propaga.

“Tiene sentido que si el Alzheimer inicia en una parte aislada del cerebro y luego se extiende, entonces entre más temprano pueda tratarse, mejor estarán los pacientes “, dijo Small.

Más recientemente, los investigadores del ADRC han comenzado a desarrollar nuevas intervenciones terapéuticas.

Michael Shelanski, MD, is Co-Director of the Taub Institute and Delafield Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology.

Michael Shelanski, MD, es codirector del Instituto Taub y profesor Delafield de Patología y Biología Celular.

“Todavía no hemos tenido ese momento innovador que conduzca a una cura, pero hay un sentido optimista de que está en el horizonte”, comentó Small.

Los avances en el diagnóstico por imagen han hecho más fácil detectar la enfermedad del Alzheimer, pero las pruebas no son de fácil acceso para la población en general.

“La avanzada tecnología de escaneo es magnífica, pero muy cara”, explicó Shelanski. “No es factible hacerlo en todas partes, especialmente en las comunidades pequeñas”.

“El Santo Grial sería tener finalmente un análisis de sangre para diagnosticar la enfermedad del Alzheimer”, afirmó.

“Idealmente, sí, un día seremos capaces de hacer exámenes de detección para todo el mundo”, coincidió Small. “Pero tiene que ser factible realizarlos verdaderamente en todos, no sólo en quienes tienen acceso a los mejores recursos médicos”.

Para obtener más información sobre el Instituto Taub o el Centro de Investigación de la enfermedad del Alzheimer del Centro Médico de la Universidad Columbia, visite www.cumc.columbia.edu/dept/taub/ y cumc.columbia.edu/adrc/.