Candidates’ transit forum highlights differences
Candidatos presentan diferencias en foro de tránsito

  • English
  • Español

Candidates’ transit forum highlights differences

Story and photos by Colby Smith

Mayra S. Linares, Gabriela Rosa and Ruben Vargas, all candidates for New York State’s 72nd Assembly District, appeared Thursday night at the Columbia University’s Russ Berrie Medical Pavilion to discuss the issues facing the public transportation system in the Washington Heights and Inwood neighborhoods, as well as neighborhoods within the Upper West Side and Harlem.

The Northern Manhattan Candidates Forum on Mass Transit, organized by the Transit Riders Action Committee (TRAC) of WE ACT for Environmental Justice, on Thurs., Sept. 6th got off to a somewhat rocky start.

A forum on mass transit issues in northern Manhattan was attended by three candidates for the 72nd Assembly District; from left to right: Mayra S. Linares, Ruben Vargas and Gabriela Rosa.

A forum on mass transit issues in northern Manhattan was attended by three candidates for the 72nd Assembly District; from left to right: Mayra S. Linares, Ruben Vargas and Gabriela Rosa.

WE ACT Deputy Director Cecil Corbin-Mark announced that there would be some changes to the night’s program.

Instead of also featuring a discussion among the candidates for the 31st Senatorial District as had been planned, the forum would only consist of the Assembly candidates.

“Two of the Senatorial Candidates did not confirm,” Corbin-Mark explained. “And the laws prohibit only one candidate from appearing at the forum. In that case, it would be classified as a campaign donation.”

In spite of the initial setbacks, the night proceeded smoothly.

Linares, Rosa and Vargas spoke candidly about the host of issues facing public transit in Northern Manhattan, such as the impending fear of a March fare hike and the increasing lack of funding for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

Before asking the candidates questions, WE ACT Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator Jake Carlson spoke briefly, explaining in plain and simple terms how the MTA works.

“What people don’t realize is that most of the [MTA’s] money comes from the state government,” Carlson explained. “In actuality, the mayor has very little say. The real power lies in the state.”

Carlson also made a point to explain why the MTA is in such a poor financial state.

“What we’re really talking about when we talk about money is a lack of funding from the state and federal levels,” Carlson said. “Our elected officials in Albany have taken 260 million dollars [over the past three years] that was supposed to go to the MTA and used it to plug other holes.”

Carlson then introduced the Forum Moderator, José Simián, a veteran bi-lingual writer and Spanish language television news personality.

Simian asked four general questions, allowing each of the candidates to respond.

The discussion was moderated by WE ACT Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator Jake Carlson (left) and Jose Simián (right), veteran journalist and host of “Contraportada”, an arts and culture segment on NY1 Noticias.

The discussion was moderated by WE ACT Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator Jake Carlson (left) and Jose Simián (right), veteran journalist and host of “Contraportada”, an arts and culture segment on NY1 Noticias.

There was a surprising amount of disagreement among the candidates on the issue of how to best put the MTA on stable financial footing.

Rosa repeatedly asserted that the MTA must stop hiring outside contractors for construction and repair.

“This is hurting the MTA, and ultimately the people who use mass transit every day are the ones getting hit,” Rosa argued. “If we put our people in there, we will have money enough.”

Rosa also called for a reduction in the salaries and bonuses of senior executive members of the MTA Board.

Linares spoke about the need to take a close look at the budget and determine where cuts can be made.

She also discussed the need to focus more attention at the state legislature on mass transit in northern Manhattan.

“We are not getting enough attention uptown,” Linares said. “I know there are a lot of other projects, but I would see how I could bring more attention to our communities.”

One audience question asked about congestion pricing, which Linares said she does not support, claiming that it would only “add another burden” in already tough economic times.

Rosa agreed, but Vargas said it was something he “would consider.”

The moment that provoked the greatest response, however, was Vargas’s declaration that he would consider cutting subway service from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.

Vargas argued that those four hours could be used to clean the trains and stations, citing a similar strategy used in Paris.

“It works over there,” Vargas said. “It would save revenue and promote cleaner and safer subways.”

Later in the night, as Simian and Carlson read audience-submitted questions, one question asked about the impact that such a reduction in service would have on overnight workers.

Rosa seized the opportunity to reply to Vargas’s proposal.

“This is not Paris; this is New York,” Rosa said. “This city works 24 hours. People who work at night should be served the same as people who work during the day.”

Linares voiced her agreement, while Vargas remained steadfast.

The three candidates did agree on the issue of representation.

Currently, many of the MTA Board members do not even use the public transportation system. All of the candidates spoke about the enormous problems that this situation presents.

“I am a firm believer that we as users have something to say,” Rosa said. “We have to open the MTA to the community so they have the opportunity to hear what the users have to say.”

Flora Huang, a spokesperson for TRAC, closed the event just before 8:30 p.m., encouraging everyone to continue the discussion on mass transit by attending a public meeting on Saturday, September 8, at 10 a.m. at the WE ACT office on 1851 Amsterdam Avenue.

TRAC hosts similar meetings monthly.

“Our service is not adequate and could be better,” Huang said. “This is a chance for us to advocate for much better service at a reasonable rate.”

 

Candidatos presentan diferencias en foro de tránsito

Historia y fotos por Colby Smith

Mayra S. Linares, Gabriela Rosa y Rubén Vargas, todos candidatos para la Asamblea del Distrito 72 del estado de Nueva York, aparecieron el jueves en la noche en el Pabellón Medico Russ Berrie de la Universidad Columbia para discutir los asuntos que enfrenta el sistema de transportación público en los vecindarios de Washington Heights e Inwood, como también vecindarios dentro del ‘Upper West Side’ y Harlem.

El Foro de Candidatos del Norte de Manhattan en Transportación, organizado por el Comité ‘Transit Riders Action’ (TRAC, por sus siglas en inglés) de ‘WE ACT’ para Justicia Ambiental, el jueves, 6 de septiembre tuvo un comienzo algo rocoso.

A forum on mass transit issues in northern Manhattan was attended by three candidates for the 72nd Assembly District; from left to right: Mayra S. Linares, Ruben Vargas and Gabriela Rosa.

Los tres candidatos para la Asamblea del Distrito 72; de izquierda a derecha: Mayra S. Linares, Rubén Vargas y Gabriela Rosa participan en un foro sobre asuntos de transportación pública en el Norte de Manhattan.

La directora suplente de ‘WE ACT’, Cecil Corbin-Mark, indicó que habría algunos desafortunados cambios al programa de la noche.

En lugar de también presentar una discusión entre los candidatos para el Distrito Senatorial 31 como había sido planificado, el foro solo consistiría de los candidatos a la Asamblea.

“Dos de los candidatos senatoriales no confirmaron”, explicó Corbin-Mark. “Y la ley prohíbe la aparición de un solo candidato en el foro. En ese caso, seria clasificado como una donación a la compaña”.

A pesar de los tropiezos iniciales, la noche siguió sin problemas

Linares, Rosa y Vargas hablaron con franqueza y elocuentemente acerca de la variedad de asuntos que enfrenta la transportación pública en el Norte de Manhattan, tales como el inminente miedo del alza de tarifa en marzo y el aumento de falta de fondos de la Autoridad Metropolitana de Transportación (MTA, por sus siglas en inglés).

Antes de hacerles preguntas a los candidatos, Jake Carlson, de Política Ambiental y Coordinador de Defensa de ‘WE ACT’ habló brevemente, explicando en términos claros y simples como funciona la MTA.

“Lo que la gente no sabe es que la mayoría del dinero de la MTA viene del gobierno estatal”, explicó Carlson. “En la actualidad, el Alcalde tiene muy poco que decir.

El poder real recae en el estado”. Carlson también hizo un punto para explicar el porque la MTA está en un estado financiero tan precario.

“De lo que realmente estamos hablando cuando hablamos acerca de dinero es la falta de fondos por parte del estado y los niveles federales”, dijo Carlson.

“Nuestros oficiales electos en Albany han tomado 260 millones de dólares (durante los pasados tres años) que se suponían fueran a la MTA y lo utilizaron para llenar otros huecos”.

Carlson entonces presentó al moderador del foro, José Simian, un veterano escritor bilingüe y personalidad de las noticias en la televisión en español.

Simian hizo cuatro preguntas en general, permitiéndole a cada uno de los candidatos contestar.

Hubo una sorprendente cantidad de desacuerdos entre los candidatos en el asunto de cómo poner la MTA financieramente estable.

Rosa afirmó repetidas veces que la MTA debía de parar la contratación de contratistas externos para construcción y reparación.

“Esto está afectando la MTA, y en última instancia las personas que utilizan el transporte público cada día son los que están siendo golpeados”, argumentó Rosa. “Si ponemos a nuestra gente ahí, tendríamos suficiente dinero”.

Rosa también abogó por una reducción en los salarios y bonos de miembros ejecutivos de la junta de MTA.

The discussion was moderated by WE ACT Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator Jake Carlson (left) and Jose Simián (right), veteran journalist and host of “Contraportada”, an arts and culture segment on NY1 Noticias.

La discusión fue moderada por Jake Carlson, de Política Ambiental y Coordinador de Defensa de ‘WE ACT’ (izquierda) y José Simian (derecha), veterano periodista y animador de “Contraportada”, un segmento de artes y cultura en NY1 Noticias.

Linares habló acerca de la necesidad de dar una mirada de cerca al presupuesto y determinar donde se pueden hacer recorte.

Ella también discutió la necesidad de enfocar más atención en la legislatura estatal en el norte de Manhattan.

“No estamos consiguiendo suficiente atención,” Linares dijo.

“Sé que hay muchos de otros proyectos, pero vería cómo podría traer más atención a nuestras comunidades.”

Una pregunta de la audiencia preguntó por la tasa de congestión, que Linares dijo que ella no apoyaría, diciendo que “agregaría solamente otra carga”.

Rosa dijo que también se opondría, pero Vargas dijo que era algo que él lo “consideraría.”

Sin embargo, el momento que provocó la mayor respuesta, fue la declaración de Vargas de que el consideraría cerrar el servicio de trenes de 1 a.m. a 5 a.m.

Vargas argumentó que esas cuatro horas podrían ser utilizadas para limpiar los trenes y estaciones, citando una estrategia similar en Paris.

“Allá funciona”, dijo Vargas. “Podría tener ganancias y promover trenes más limpios y seguros”.

Tarde en la noche, mientras Simian y Carlson leían preguntas sometidas por la audiencia, una pregunta lidiaba con el impacto que tal reducción en el servicio tendría en los trabajadores nocturnos.

Rosa aprovechó la oportunidad para responder a la propuesta de Vargas.

“Esto no es Paris; esto es Nueva York”, dijo Rosa. “Esta ciudad trabaja 24 horas. La gente que trabaja en la noche debe de ser servida al igual que las personas que trabajan durante el día”.

Linares expresó su acuerdo, mientras que Vargas permaneció firme.

Los tres candidatos estuvieron de acuerdo en el asunto de la representación.

Actualmente, muchos de los miembros de la junta de la MTA ni siquiera utilizan el sistema de transportación pública. Todos los candidatos hablaron acerca del enorme problema que presenta esta situación.

“Soy una fiel creyente que nosotros como usuarios tenemos algo que decir”, dijo Rosa. “Tenemos que abrir la MTA a la comunidad para que tengan la oportunidad de escuchar lo que los usuarios tienen que decir”.

Flora Huang, portavoz de TRAC, cerró el evento justo antes de las 8:30 p.m., animando a todo el mundo a continuar la discusión del sistema de transportación asistiendo a la reunión pública el sábado, 8 de septiembre, a las 10 a.m. en la oficina de ‘WE ACT’ en el 1851 de la Avenida Amsterdam.

TRAC auspicia reuniones similares mensualmente.

“Nuestro servicio no es adecuado y podría ser mejor”, dijo Huong. “Esta es una oportunidad para nosotros pedir mejor servicio y una tarifa razonable”.