ArteArtsEntertainmentLocalNewsPolitics/Government

Altagracia del Alto

Altagracia del Alto

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“She was very committed,” says Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez of cultural arts advocate Altagracia Diloné Levat, who recently passed away.
“She was very committed,” says Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez of cultural arts advocate Altagracia Diloné Levat, who recently passed away.

On New Year’s Eve last year, Altagracia Diloné Levat, Program Manager and Managing Director of the Alianza Dominicana Cultural Center (ADCC), discovered she had Stage Four gallbladder cancer.

She died four months later, on April 16th.

“She was very courageous,” said Josephine Tavera, Levat’s sister. “She fought hard.”

Levat was known as a fighter on all fronts, particularly in her work in arts advocacy. Together with Catholic Charities, which is affiliated with ADCC, and Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez, Levat played a pivotal role in establishing the groundwork for the center to serve as a place where performing and cultural art would be accessible to all.

A fiscal allocation of $250,000 from the Councilmember helped bring the Center to fruition, and Levat strove to ensure that it flourished.

Before her death, Levat donated her piano to the Alianza Dominicana Cultural Center (ADCC).
Before her death, Levat donated her piano to the Alianza Dominicana Cultural Center (ADCC).

Under her leadership, the Center hosted a number of free programs, including screenings for the KidCinemaFest family film festival, as well as instructional sessions from a host of groups such as the Association of Dominican Classical Artists, Inc. (ADCA), for which she also served as a board member; the People’s Theatre Project, Washington Heights Community Conservatory, and the Camarata Dominicana, among others.

Before her work at ADCC, housed in the Triangle Building at West 166th Street, Levat also helped establish the Dominican Studies Institute (DSI) at City College, the nation’s first university-based research institute focused on the study of people of Dominican descent in the United States and other parts of the world.

Levat remained devoted to her work until her last moments. Her sister recalled that she kept her computer at her side while being treated at NewYork Presbyterian and continued to do work days before she died.

“Her mission was to keep doing the work,” recalled Councilmember Rodríguez, who visited with her at the hospital. He first met Levat in 2000 at a conference about the Dominican agenda in the United States. “She was very committed.”

Levat was ADCC’s Program Manager and Managing Director. </br><i>Photo: J. Tavera</i>
Levat was ADCC’s Program Manager and Managing Director.
Photo: J. Tavera

Levat grew up poor in the Dominican Republic and New York City, where her family relocated after her mother, who held a number of jobs, brought her and four siblings over one by one.

Her sister Tavera, the youngest, was born in the United States.

Although Levat was unable to afford music lessons in her youth, she learned to play the cello, viola and piano at the High School of Music and Art on West 135th Street.

Her mother always encouraged her children to keep striving, and Levat became the second person in her family to go to college after receiving a full scholarship to Barnard College.

She made sure to pass along the love of education to her siblings, said Tavera.

“She would make me read the New York Times – I’ve been reading it since I was seven.”

Tavera’s older sister would also have her write book reports during the summer. While Tavera then completed her assignments begrudgingly, she is now grateful for her sister’s persistence.

“She was a mentor and a role model for us.”

“She was a mentor and a role model,” says her sister Josephine Tavera. </br><i>Photo: J. Tavera</i>
“She was a mentor and a role model,” says her sister Josephine Tavera.
Photo: J. Tavera

Levat strove to bring opportunities to working class families that she might have had a hard time imagining for herself growing up on a farm in the Dominican Republic.

“My sister has always been a person who believed in equal rights for everybody,” said Tavera. “It was really important to her that art be included in people’s lives.”

One of Levat’s chores on the family farm was to feed the pigs. It is possible that is was then her older sister picked up a parasite that caused elephantitis. She was eventually treated for the disease when she moved to the United States, but the parasites damaged her lymphatic system and doctors warned that she might be more susceptible to cancer later on in life.

Nonetheless, Levat’s diagnosis and rapid decline was unexpected.

Less than two months before her diagnosis, she was at ADCC at all hours, filling the space with her energy and dubbing herself “the ghost of the ghost of the Triangle Building.”

"Music is good for everybody,” said Josue Núñez.
“Music is good for everybody,” said Josue Núñez.

“It was a big surprise to all of us,” said Councilmember Rodríguez of the news.

But Levat did not back down.

“Her will to live was strong,” said Tavera.

During the course of her treatment, she underwent three surgeries after the tumor on her gallbladder spread. She also underwent chemotherapy despite the doctors’ grim prognosis.

Two months ago, it had become evident that there was no stopping the cancer, and Levat went into hospice care.

After her death, Levat, who had earlier converted to Judaism, was buried in a Jewish cemetery on April 18th.

Councilmember Rodríguez said he would look to have the corner of 166th Street and Audubon Avenue, where ADCC is located, co-named in Levat’s honor. “Altagracia will always be alive because she’ll always be a motivation for all of us,” he said.

The upright Yamaha stands in ADCC’s studios.
The upright Yamaha stands in ADCC’s studios.

Her work at ADCC was lauded by Monsignor Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director of Catholic Charities.

“Her passion will live on through the hundreds of children that continue, thanks to her efforts, to learn about their culture and others through dance, music and art,” said Sullivan.

“She always gave 300 percent of herself,” agreed Tavera.

Levat ensured that there would be more than memories left behind at ADCC.

Long after high school, she had continued to play the piano, and acquired an upright Yamaha for her home.

Shortly after her diagnosis, she felt the best place for the piano was at ADCC; it stands now in the basement studios of the Triangle Building.

Josue Núñez, a 16-year-old student from Gregorio Luperon High School, could be found playing it on a recent afternoon. He has been taking piano lessons at the Washington Heights Community Conservatory for a year now, learning his craft and also mentoring younger students.

Like the piano’s former owner, Núñez says he wants pass along a love and appreciation for art.

“Music is good for everybody.”

Altagracia del Alto

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


El piano se sitúa ahora en los estudios del sótano del Edificio Triángulo.
El piano se sitúa ahora en los estudios del sótano del Edificio Triángulo.

En la víspera del año nuevo pasado, Altagracia Diloné Levat, Gerente de Programa y Directora Gerente del Centro Cultural Alianza Dominicana (ADCC por sus siglas en inglés), descubrió que tenía cáncer de vesícula biliar en cuarta etapa.

Murió cuatro meses después, el 16 de abril.

“Ella fue muy valiente”, dijo Josefina Tavera, la hermana de Levat. “Luchó duro”.

Levat era conocida como una luchadora en todos los frentes, sobre todo en su trabajo como defensora de las artes. Junto con Catholic Charities, afiliada con ADCC, y el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez, Levat desempeñó un papel fundamental en el establecimiento de las bases para que el Centro sirviera como un lugar donde las artes escénicas y culturales fueran accesibles para todos.

Una asignación fiscal de $250,000 dólares del Concejal, ayudó a llevar al Centro a buen término, y Levat se esforzó para asegurarse de que floreciera.

"La música es buena para todo el mundo”, dijo Josue Núñez.
“La música es buena para todo el mundo”, dijo Josue Núñez.

Bajo su liderazgo, el Centro organizó una serie de programas gratuitos, incluyendo proyecciones para el festival de cine familiar KidCinemaFest, así como sesiones de instrucción de un sin fín de grupos como la Asociación Dominicana de Artistas Clásicas, Inc. (ADCA por sus siglas en inglés), para la cual también se desempeñó como miembro de la junta; Proyecto de Teatro del Pueblo, la Camarata Dominicana, entre otros.

Antes de su trabajo en ADCC, ubicada en el Edificio Triángulo en la calle 166 oeste, Levat ayudó a establecer el Instituto de Estudios Dominicanos (DSI por sus siglas en inglés) en el City College, primer instituto de investigación universitario de la nación centrado en el estudio de las personas de origen dominicano en los Estados Unidos y otras partes del mundo.

Levat permaneció dedicada a su trabajo hasta sus últimos momentos. Su hermana recuerda que mantuvo su computadora a su lado mientras estaba siendo tratada en el NewYork Presbyterian y continuó haciéndolo días antes de morir.

“Su misión era la de seguir haciendo el trabajo”, recordó el concejal Rodríguez, quien la visitó en el hospital. Conoció a Levat en el 2000 en una conferencia sobre la agenda dominicana en los Estados Unidos. “Ella estaba muy comprometida”.

"Ella fue una mentora y un modelo a seguir para nosotros”, dice su hermana Josephine Tavera. </br><i>Foto: J. Tavera</i>
“Ella fue una mentora y un modelo a seguir para nosotros”, dice su hermana Josephine Tavera.
Foto: J. Tavera

Levat creció en la pobreza en la República Dominicana y la ciudad de Nueva York, a donde su familia se trasladó después de que su madre, quien trabajo en varios empleos, hizo todo para que ella y sus cuatro hermanos fueran traídos uno por uno.

Su hermana Tavera, la más joven, nació en los Estados Unidos.

Aunque Levat no podía permitirse las clases de música en su juventud, aprendió a tocar el violonchelo, viola y piano en la Escuela Superior de Música y Arte en la calle 135 oeste.

Su madre siempre animó a sus hijos a seguir luchando, y Levat se convirtió en la segunda persona de su familia en ir a la universidad, después de recibir una beca completa para la Universidad Barnard.

Ella se aseguró de transmitir el amor de la enseñanza a sus hermanos, dijo Tavera.

“Ella me hacía leer el New York Times. Lo he estado leyendo desde que tenía siete años”.

La hermana mayor de Tavera también la hacía preparar un reporte escrito de algún libro durante el verano. Aunque Tavera entonces terminaba sus tareas a regañadientes, ella ahora está muy agradecida por la insistencia de su hermana.

“Ella fue una mentora y un modelo a seguir para nosotros”.

Levat fue Gerente de Programa y Directora Gerente del Centro Cultural Alianza Dominicana. </br><i>Foto: J. Tavera</i>
Levat fue Gerente de Programa y Directora Gerente del Centro Cultural Alianza Dominicana.
Foto: J. Tavera

Levat se esforzó para crear oportunidades para las familias de clase trabajadora que ella difícilmente pudo imaginar creciendo en una granja en la República Dominicana.

“Mi hermana siempre fue una persona que creyó en la igualdad de derechos para todos”, dijo Tavera. “Era muy importante para ella que el arte se incluyera en las vidas de las personas”.

Una de las tareas de Levat en la granja familiar era alimentar a los cerdos. Es posible que al pisar el suelo fangoso Levat fue contagiada con un parásito que le causó elefantiasis en las piernas. Fue tratada eventualmente de la enfermedad cuando se mudó a los Estados Unidos, pero los parásitos dañaron su sistema linfático y los médicos le advirtieron que podría ser más susceptible al cáncer más adelante en la vida.

No obstante, el diagnóstico de Levat, y rápido declive, fue inesperado.

Menos de dos meses antes de su diagnóstico, ella estaba en ADCC a todas horas, llenando el espacio con su energía y desdoblándose, “el fantasma del fantasma del Edificio Triángulo”.

Antes de morir, Levat donó su piano al Centro Cultural Alianza Dominicana (ADCC por sus siglas en inglés).
Antes de morir, Levat donó su piano al Centro Cultural Alianza Dominicana (ADCC por sus siglas en inglés).

“Fue una gran sorpresa para todos nosotros”, dijo el concejal Rodríguez de la noticia.

Pero Levat no dio marcha atrás.

“Su voluntad de vivir era fuerte”, dijo Tavera.

Durante el curso de su tratamiento, se sometió a tres cirugías después de que el tumor en la vesícula biliar se propagara. También se sometió a quimioterapia a pesar del sombrío pronóstico de los médicos.

Dos meses después, se hizo evidente que no había nada que detuviera el cáncer y

Levat entró en cuidados paliativos.

Después de su muerte, Levat, que se había convertido al judaísmo antes, fue enterrada en un cementerio judío el 18 de abril.

El concejal Rodríguez dijo que buscará que la esquina de la calle 166 y la avenida Audubon, donde se encuentra ADCC, sea co-nombrada en honor de Levat. “Altagracia siempre estará viva porque ella siempre será una motivación para todos nosotros”, dijo.

"Ella estaba muy comprometida", dice el Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez de defensora de las artes culturales, Altagracia Diloné Levat, quien murió recientemente.
“Ella estaba muy comprometida”, dice el Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez de defensora de las artes culturales, Altagracia Diloné Levat, quien murió recientemente.

Su trabajo en ADCC fue alabado por el monseñor Kevin Sullivan.

“Su pasión vivirá a través de los cientos de niños que continúan, gracias a sus esfuerzos, aprendiendo sobre su cultura y otros a través de la danza, la música y el arte”, dijo el monseñor Sullivan, director ejecutivo de Catholic Charities.

“Ella siempre daba el 300 por ciento de sí misma”, coincidió Tavera.

Levat aseguró que habría más que recuerdos dejados atrás en ADCC.

Mucho tiempo después de la escuela secundaria, ella continuó tocando el piano y adquirió uno para su casa.

Poco después de su diagnóstico, sintió que el mejor lugar para el piano, un Yamaha, estaba en ADCC.

Ella donó el piano, antes de morir, y se sitúa ahora en los estudios del sótano del Edificio Triángulo.

Es allí donde reside en la actualidad, una pequeña parte de su objetivo de compartir las artes con todo el mundo.

Josué Núñez, un estudiante de 16 años de Gregorio Luperón High School, se pudo encontrar tocando el piano la semana pasada. Él ha estado tomando clases en el Conservatorio de la Comunidad de Washington Heights desde hace un año y también hace tutoría con los estudiantes más jóvenes.

Al igual que la ex propietaria del piano, Núñez dice que quiere seguir propagando un amor y aprecio por el arte.

“La música es buena para todo el mundo.”

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker