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A WIN for life
Un premio a la vida

A WIN for life

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Participants in NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Network’s WIN for Health Program were honored for their work.
Participants in NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Network’s WIN for Health Program were honored for their work.

Máximo Pizarro was diagnosed with type II diabetes in 1998.

At the time, the 5’8” Pizarro weighed 302 pounds.

Despite his diagnosis and his body mass, Pizarro did not work to address his weight.

“I ate everything just to get food in my stomach,” he recalled.

It wasn’t until after his third heart attack that he decided to take his health into his hands. “I wanted to live and see my grandchildren.”

Pizarro was referred to the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Network’s WIN (Washington Heights/Inwood) for Health Program, which was formerly the WIN for Asthma program.

The latter was founded in 2005.

WIN for Health is now an umbrella program for WIN for Asthma and the newly inducted WIN for Diabetes Program.

The yearlong program is conducted in collaboration with a number of community partners, including the Dominican Women’s Association, the Community League of the Heights, the Fort George Community Enrichment Center, and the Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation.

“I’ve shared what I learned with other parents,” said Jenny Ramos, with her son Yuniel, who suffers from asthma.
“I’ve shared what I learned with other parents,” said Jenny Ramos, with her son Yuniel, who suffers from asthma.

The WIN for Health Program celebrated the accomplishments of 150 of its participants this past Tues., Oct. 29th, after completing a yearlong health education program in which they were given tools to help control their asthma and diabetes.

“This is a hospital-community partnership designed to strengthen the existing community-wide network of care and to improve outcomes for local residents,” said Andres Nieto, the Director of Community Health Education and Outreach at NewYork-Presbyterian’s Ambulatory Care Network. “It is a testament to our partners in the community and our own team that we have had such success, and we will continue to work hard for greater positive outcomes.”

Pizarro is now 30 pounds slimmer, and feels loads healthier.

Through the program he was assigned a home attendant, and a scheduled delivery of Meals on Wheels.

For lunch, he generally receives, for example, a selection of chicken or fish with vegetables. Pizarro eats a modest breakfast of one egg white with cheese on wheat toast and for dinner he eats salad—without dressing, and boiled chicken.

“I wanted to live and see my grandchildren,” said Máximo Pizarro has lost 30 pounds with WIN.
“I wanted to live and see my grandchildren,” said Máximo Pizarro has lost 30 pounds with WIN.

Boiled chicken has less fat than fried or rotisserie chicken.

He does not drink any soda or have snacks, and goes on walks at three times a week, during which he generally covers 12 blocks.

It is an achievement for Pizarro, who wasn’t able to make the distance before.

Before taking on his healthier regimen, he explained, “I had to stop walking because I got shaky.”

There are approximately 200 patients in the WIN program this year. 130 of them are asthma patients and the rest are in the diabetes and hypertension program.

Krystal Cartwright is the Clinical Director of WIN for Diabetes.

“We decided to do this program because WIN for Asthma really worked and diabetes is an enormous disease and a chronic health problem,” she said.

“In Washington Heights and Inwood, there are higher rates of diabetes (than before) and there’s a lot more deaths in recent years.”

In Northern Manhattan, 19,000 people are living with Type 2 diabetes, and the rate of childhood asthma is three times the national average, according

These deaths, she said, can be attributed to the disease.

Luz Adriana Matiz is the Medical director of WIN for Asthma.
Luz Adriana Matiz is the Medical director of WIN for Asthma.

The program also incorporates a mental health component, because those who suffer from Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have a mental health issue, explained Cartwright.

“Emotions can negatively affect control of your diabetes,” she said.

There are other reasons the two programs fit well together under the same umbrella.

There are correlations between weight—which is often a factor in diabetes type II—and asthma.

“We recommend that kids who have asthma and are obese lose weight because their asthma [condition] will do better,” said Luz Adriana Matiz, the Medical Director of WIN for Asthma.

As the WIN for Health program expands and continues, Matiz said she said there are several area needs that the program might strive to address, including housing advocacy and support.

“Most of the families we serve live in old housing where landlords struggle to meet their needs,” she said.

Participants and families gathered at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital’s Wintergarden.
Participants and families gathered at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital’s Wintergarden.

Jenny Ramos’ son, Yuniel, 5, suffers from asthma, particularly during the winter. After another emergency room visit last year she decided to enroll in the WIN for Asthma program. She was connected with a community health care worker who visited her apartment.

The health care worker noticed a problem in the bathroom.

“Our bathroom was stained with water leaks,” said Ramos. The leaks fed mold that, in turn, worsened Yuniel’s asthma.

The incident highlights the correlation between access to clean and safe housing and medical conditions such as asthma.

Ramos also refrains from cleaning her apartment with toxic chemicals while her son is at home. For walls and other surfaces she recommends using vinegar, which is an antiseptic that contains no toxins.

“I’ve shared what I learned with other parents in my community,” said Ramos.

The program has been recognized nationally.

There were approximately 200 patients in the WIN program this year.
There were approximately 200 patients in the WIN program this year.

WIN for Asthma was awarded the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2010 National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management. In addition, an article describing the WIN for Asthma Program was published in the August 2012 edition of the American Journal of Public Health.

Ramos said that every time her son goes to the emergency room as a result of his asthma, which is generally three times a year, he misses three or four days of school.

She foresees that this winter will be much better than in the past, when he would go the emergency room three or four times each season.

Aside from different cleaning methods, Ramos makes it her business to know when to give Yuniel his inhaler and medication—including 15 minutes before one of his favorite activities.

“I love to play ball!” exclaimed a happy and cough-free Yuniel.

For more information on the WIN for Health Program, please visit www.nyp.org/services/acn_outreach_win.html or call 212.305.2076.

Un premio a la vida

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Los participantes del Programa de Salud de la Red de Cuidado Ambulatorio WIN (Washington Heights/Inwood) del Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian fueron reconocidos.
Los participantes del Programa de Salud de la Red de Cuidado Ambulatorio WIN (Washington Heights/Inwood) del Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian fueron reconocidos.

Máximo Pizarro fue diagnosticado con Diabetes Tipo II en el 1998.

En ese momento, Pizarro de 5’8” pesaba 302 libras.

A pesar de su diagnostico y su masa corporal Pizarro no hizo nada para mejorar su peso.

“Comía de todo solo para poner comida en mi estómago”, recordó.

No fue hasta su tercer ataque al corazón que decidió tomar su salud en serio.

“Deseaba vivir y ver a mis nietos”.

Pizarro fue referido al Programa de Salud de la Red de Cuidado Ambulatorio WIN (Washington Heights/Inwood) del Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian, el cual anteriormente era el programa WIN para el Asma. WIN para la Salud ahora es una sombrilla del programa WIN para el Asma y el recién instituido Programa WIN para la Diabetes.

“Compartí lo que aprendí con padres en mi comunidad”, dijo Jenny Ramos, con su hijo Yuniel, quien sufre de asma.
“Compartí lo que aprendí con padres en mi comunidad”, dijo Jenny Ramos, con su hijo Yuniel, quien sufre de asma.

El programa de un año es conducido en colaboración con un número de socios comunales, incluyendo la Asociación de Mujeres Dominicanas, la Liga Comunal de los Heights, el Centro de Enriquecimiento Comunal Fort George y la Corporación de Mejoramiento del Norte de Manhattan.

El Programa de Salud WIN celebró la graduación de 150 de sus participantes el martes, 29 de octubre.

“Esta es una asociación comunitario diseñado para reforzar la red y mejorar los resultados para los residentes locales”, dijo Andrés Nieto, el Director de Educación para la Salud y Promoción de la Comunidad en la Red de Cuidado Ambulatorio NewYork-Presbyterian. “Es un testimonio de nuestros socios en la comunidad y nuestro propio equipo que hemos tenido tanto éxito, y vamos a seguir trabajando duro para mayores resultados positivos.”

Ahora el tiene 30 libras menos, y se siente mucho más saludable.

A través del programa se le asignó una persona a su hogar, y una entrega de Comida Sobre Ruedas. Para almuerzo, por ejemplo recibía generalmente una selección de pollo o pescado con vegetales.

Pizarro se come un modesto desayuno de una clara de huevo con queso en pan integral y para la cena como ensalada – sin aderezo, y pollo hervido. El pollo hervido tiene menos grasas que el pollo frito o asado.

“Deseaba vivir y ver a mis nietos”, dijo Máximo Pizarro, quien ha perdido 30 libros con WIN.
“Deseaba vivir y ver a mis nietos”, dijo Máximo Pizarro, quien ha perdido 30 libros con WIN.

No toma ningún tipo de soda ni hace meriendas, y sale a caminar tres veces a la semana. Generalmente cubre 12 bloques. Es un logro para Pizarro, quien antes no podía caminar esa distancia.

“Tuvo que dejar de caminar porque temblaba”.

Hay aproximadamente 200 pacientes en el programa WIN este año. Un máximo de 130 de ellos son pacientes de asma y el resto están en el programa de diabetes e hipertensión.

Krystal Cartwright es la directora clínica de WIN para la Diabetes.

“Decidimos hacer este programa porque WIN para el Asma realmente funcionó y la diabetes es una enorme enfermedad y un problema de salud crónico”, dijo ella.

“En Washington Heights e Inwood hay tasas de diabetes más altas que antes y hay muchas más muertes en años recientes”, que pueden ser atribuidas a la enfermedad.

Luz Adriana Matiz es la Directora Médica de WIN para el Asma.
Luz Adriana Matiz es la Directora Médica de WIN para el Asma.

El programa también incorpora un componente de salud mental, porque aquellos que sufren de diabetes tipo II tienen el doble de probabilidad de sufrir problemas de salud mental, explicó Cartwright.

“Las emociones pueden afectar negativamente el control de su diabetes”, dijo ella.

Hay otras razones por la que los dos programas hacen bien el estar bajo la misma sombrilla.

Hay correlaciones entre el peso – el cual a menudo es un factor en la diabetes tipo II – y el asma.

“Recomendamos que los niños que tienen asma y están obesos pierdan peso porque su asma mejora”, dijo Luz Adriana Matiz, directora médica de WIN para el Asma.

Según el programa de WIN para la Salud se expande y continua, Matiz dijo que hay varias áreas del programa que deben mejorar, incluyendo abogar por vivienda y apoyo.

“La mayoría de las familias que servimos viven en viejas viviendas donde los dueños tienen dificultades en cumplir sus necesidades”, dijo ella.

Participantes y sus familiares celebraron en el salón ‘Wintergarden’ del Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian.
Participantes y sus familiares celebraron en el salón ‘Wintergarden’ del Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian.

El hijo de Jenny Ramos, Yuniel de 5 años, sufre de asma durante el invierno. Luego de otra visita a la sala de emergencia el año pasado ella decidió inscribirse en el programa WIB para el asma. Fue conectada con un trabajador del cuidado de la ciudad quien visitó su apartamento.

Estos notaron un problema en el baño.

“Nuestro baño estaba manchado con filtraciones de agua”, dijo Ramos. Las filtraciones alimentan el moho que a su vez empeora el asma de Yuniel.

El incidente destaca la correlación entre el acceso a vivienda segura y el asma.

Ramos también se abstiene de limpiar su apartamento con químicos tóxicos cuando su hijo está en casa. Para las paredes y otras superficies ella recomienda utilizar vinagre el cual es un antiséptico que no contiene toxinas.

“Compartí lo que aprendí con padres en mi comunidad”, dijo Ramos.

Hubo aproximadamente 200 pacientes en el programa este ano.
Hubo aproximadamente 200 pacientes en el programa este ano.

Ramos dijo que cada vez que su hijo va a Sala de Emergencia como resultado de su asma, lo cual es generalmente tres veces al año, pierde tres o cuatro días de escuela.

Prevé que este invierno será mucho mejor que en el pasado, donde el iba a Sala de Emergencias tres o cuatro veces cada temporada. Además de diferentes métodos de limpieza, Ramos está pendiente de saber cuando le da a Yuniel su inhalador y medicamentos – incluyendo 15 minutos antes de sus actividades favoritas.

“Me encanta jugar bola”, exclamó un feliz y libre de tos Yuniel.

Para más información sobre el programa WIN, favor visite www.nyp.org/services/acn_outreach_win.html o llame al 212.305.2076.

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