LocalNewsPublic Safety

A Vigil for Islan
Una Vigilia para Islan

A Vigil for Islan

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


A rally was held in Harlem in honor of Islan Nettles, a transgender woman who died after being beaten.
A rally was held in Harlem in honor of Islan Nettles, a transgender woman who died after being beaten.

Hate.

That is what those assembled for a vigil in honor of Islan Nettles said killed the 21-year-old.

Nettles, a transgender woman, was brutally beaten on Sat., Aug. 17th outside a police stationhouse on West 147th Street after being confronted by a group of men as she walked by with friends.

Police reports indicate 20-year-old Paris Wilson, one of the alleged suspects, barraged Nettles with slurs as he beat her in the head. Wilson was reported to have been familiar to Nettles via Facebook, and to have been upset to discover that she was a man.

After the attack, Nettles was taken to Harlem Hospital, where she slipped into a coma and was later pronounced brain dead.

Her family decided to take her off life support on Aug. 22nd.

The attack on Nettles was the latest in a series of bias incidents this year in New York.

A total of 68 cases have been reported so far this year, a significant increase from the 54 that were reported in all of 2012.

Hundreds of supporters, including members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) community, clergy, elected officials and residents from across the city, gathered on Tues., Aug. 27th at the Jackie Robinson Park to show support for the Nettles family, which helped organize the event.

“This is a tragedy,” said Islan Nettles’ mother Denae.
“This is a tragedy,” said Islan Nettles’ mother Denae.

“We need to stop hate on all levels, when it comes to race, and when it comes to sexuality,” said Dinick Martínez, an undocumented transgender woman staying at a homeless shelter in Harlem.

The attack on Nettles left Martínez and other members of the LGBT community rattled and saddened.

“I don’t feel safe,” said Martínez. “It scares me. Really scares me. When is this going to end? We are different, but we deserve respect.”

“This is a problem within humanity, not just a LGBT issue. We shouldn’t be hurting people because we don’t understand them,” added Erica Cardwell, who works at the Hetrick-Martin Institute, an organization founded in 1979 to help the needs of the LGBTQ community. “You don’t need to be in someone’s space unless you can access their dignity. Unless you can break down that violence is full of hate, you’re not going to solve anything.”

Many present spoke from personal experience, as trangender women, and recounted first-hand tales of navigating difficult terrain.

Bianca Jillian, a 22-year-old transgender woman living in the Bronx, said that she experiences negativity in her neighborhood and elsewhere.

“I get looks, slurs—but I’ve never had a physical altercation. It scares me. I hear something like this and it could happen to anybody.”

Jillian employs her own measures of keeping safe when she’s out on the street.

“Our lives matter,” said actress Laverne Cox.
“Our lives matter,” said actress Laverne Cox.

“You should always be with somebody. You should never be alone.”

She also carries Mace with her wherever she goes.

“Thankfully, I haven’t had to use it.”

Octavia Lewis, who has been living as a transgender woman for eight years and is a case manager at the Hetrick-Martin Institute, follows the same guidelines when she goes out.

“I don’t go to unfamiliar places alone, and I don’t drink when I go out. I always pay attention to my surroundings.”

Lewis attested to being verbally abused, but not physically attacked.

She also said it was wearisome to always be on guard because others don’t understand you.

“It takes a toll on you,” she said, shaking her head. “Life every day is scary because you don’t know what you’re going to get, and that’s the honest truth.”

The incredulity, fear and anger expressed by the crowd were sentiments echoed by speakers on the stage.

“We need stop hate on all levels,” said Dinick Martinez.
“We need stop hate on all levels,” said Dinick Martinez.

“Why should we be in the shadows?” demanded performer Chanel International. “We want to be free. I refuse to be in the shadows and express myself behind closed doors.”

“We all bleed the same, we all cry and hurt the same,” she added. “Who is anyone to judge us?”

Laverne Cox, a transgender actress who has appeared in the Netflix series Orange is the New Black, also spoke.

“What the transgender community needs to hear is that our lives matter,” she said. “We need policy, and we need love.”

Nettles’ mother, Denae Nettles, was teary-eyed as she addressed the crowd.

“I love you. I love you all. Thank you for being here,” she said, through a veil of tears.

The crowd of hundreds of supporters, many of them from the LGBTQ community, shouted expressions of their love in return—though some people took offense that Nettles was sometimes referred to as ‘he’.

Nettles’ mother often too referred to Islan, whose birthname was Robert Nettles, as a “he,” but persisted in reminding all of the loss endured.

“This is a tragedy. I’m going to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” she said. “I don’t want anyone to know what it feels like to lose their baby, to have someone knock them down and beat them and beat them and beat them. People need to learn to love it or leave it.”

The grieving mother offered a small note of consolation.

“He’s in a better place, where there’s no hate.”


FOR HELP AND INFORMATION

Any community residents in need of assistance and information can reach out to the following organizations:

Harlem Pride
347.846.0362
www.harlempride.org

The Hetrick-Martin Institute
2 Astor Place
New York, NY 10003
212.674.2400
www.hmi.org

Gay Men of African Descent (GMAD)
44 Court Street #1000
Brooklyn, NY 11201
718.222.6300
www.gmad.org

Una Vigilia para Islan

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Una manifestación fue celebrada en Harlem en honor a Islan Nettles, una mujer transgénero que murió luego de ser golpeada.
Una manifestación fue celebrada en Harlem en honor a Islan Nettles, una mujer transgénero que murió luego de ser golpeada.

Odio.

Eso es lo que aquellos reunidos para una vigilia en honor a Islan Nettles dijeron mató al joven de 21 años. Nettles, una mujer transgénero, fue brutalmente golpeada el sábado, 17 de agosto en las afueras de una estación de policía en el oeste de la Calle 147 luego de ser confrontada por un grupo de hombres mientras caminaba con unos amigos.

Los reportes policíacos indican que Paris Wilson de 20 años, uno de los presuntos sospechosos, bombardeaba a Nettles con insultos mientras la golpeaba en la cabeza. Wilson había reportado haberse familiarizado con Nettles vía Facebook, y haberse molestado al descubrir que ella era un hombre.

Luego del ataque, Nettles fue llevada al Hospital Harlem, donde entró en coma y luego fue pronunciada con muerte cerebral. Su familia decidió sacarla de soporte de vida el 22 agosto.

El ataque a Nettles fue el último en una serie de incidentes este año en Nueva York.

Han sido reportados un total de 68 en este año, un significativo aumento de los 54 que fueron reportados en el 2012.

Cientos de seguidores, incluyendo miembros de la comunidad Lesbiana, Homosexual, Bisexual, Transgénero y gay (LGBTQ, por sus siglas en inglés), clero, oficiales electos y residentes de toda la ciudad, se reunieron el martes, 27 de agosto en el Parque Jackie Robinson para mostrar apoyo a la familia de Nettles, la cual ayudó a organizar el evento.

“Nuestras vidas son importante”, dijo la actriz Laverne Cox.
“Nuestras vidas son importante”, dijo la actriz Laverne Cox.

“Tenemos que detener el odio en todos los niveles, cuando se trata de raza y cuando se trata de sexualidad”, dijo Dinick Martínez, una mujer transgénero indocumentada que se queda en el albergue de desamparados en Harlem.

El ataque a Nettles dejó a Martínez y otros miembros de la comunidad LGBT entristecidos.

“No me siento segura”, dijo Martínez. “Me asusta. Realmente me asusta. ¿Cuando esto va a terminar? Somos diferentes, pero merecemos respeto”.

“Esto en un problema dentro de la humanidad, no solo un problema LGBT. No deberíamos estar hiriendo personas porque no las entendemos”, añadió Erica Cardwell, quien trabaja en el Instituto Hetrick-Martin, una organización fundada en el 1979 para ayudar con las necesidades de la comunidad LGBTQ. “Tu no tienes que estar en los zapatos de otro a menos que puedas acceder a su dignidad. A menos que puedas romper esa violencia estas lleno de odio, no vas a resolver nada”.

Muchos presentes hablaron de experiencias personales, como las mujeres transgéneros e hicieron cuentos que vivieron en esta área.

Bianca Jillian, una mujer transgénero de 22 años que vive en el Bronx, dijo que ella experimenta negatividad en su vecindario y otros lugares.

“A mi me miran – pero nunca he tenido un altercado físico. Me asusta. Escucho algo como esto y le puede suceder a cualquiera”.

Jillian emplea sus propias medidas para mantenerse segura cuando está en la calle.

“Siempre debes de estar con alguien. Nunca debes de estar sola”.

“Esto es una tragedia”, dijo Denae, madre de Islan Nettles.
“Esto es una tragedia”, dijo Denae, madre de Islan Nettles.

Ella también lleva consigo ‘Mace’ a donde quiera que vaya.

“Afortunadamente, no he tenido que usarlo”.

Octavia Lewis, quien ha vivido como mujer transgénero por ocho años y es gerente de casos en el Instituto Hetrick-Martin, sigue las mismas guías cuando sale. “Yo no voy a lugares no familiares sola, no bebo cuando salgo. Siempre presto atención a mis alrededores”.

Lewis atestigua haber sido abusada verbalmente, pero no atacada físicamente.

También dijo que era tedioso estar siempre en guardia porque otros no te entienden.

“Toma algo de ti”, dijo moviendo su cabeza. “La vida cada día da miedo porque no sabes lo que vas a encarar, y esa es la pura verdad”.

La incredulidad, el miedo y el coraje expresado por la multitud se hicieron eco de los sentimientos de los oradores presentados.

“¿Por qué deberíamos de estar en las sombras?” demandó la intérprete International Chanel. “Queremos ser libres. Me rehúso a estar en las sombras y expresarme detrás de las puertas cerradas”.

“Todos sangramos igual, todos lloramos y nos herimos igual”, añadió ella. “¿Quiénes son para juzgarnos?”.

“La vida todos los días da miedo”, dijo Octavia Lewis (derecha, con Yan Ping Soong), gerente de casos del Instituto Hetrick-Martin.
“La vida todos los días da miedo”, dijo Octavia Lewis (derecha, con Yan Ping Soong), gerente de casos del Instituto Hetrick-Martin.

Laverne Cox, una actriz transgénero quien ha aparecido en las series de Netflix ‘Orange is the New Black’, también habló.

“Lo que la comunidad de transgéneros necesita escuchar es que nuestras vidas importan”, dijo ella. “Necesitamos política, y necesitamos amor”.

La madre de Nettles, Denae Nettles, sus ojos estaban llenos de lágrimas cuando se dirigió a la multitud. “Los amo.

Los amo a todos. Gracias por estar aquí”, dijo a través de un velo de lágrimas.

La multitud de cientos de seguidores, muchos de ellos de la comunidad LGBT, gritaron expresiones de su amor de vuelta – aunque algunas personas se ofendieron de que algunas veces se referían de Nettles como un ‘el’.

La madre de Nettles también a menudo se refería de Islan, cuyo nombre de nacimiento era Robert Nettles, como un ‘el’, pero persistió en recordarles a todos sobre la pérdida que sufrió.

“Esto es una tragedia. Me voy a asegurar de que esto no vuelva a suceder”, dijo ella. “Yo no quiero que nadie sepa lo que se siente al perder a su bebe, que alguien lo tire y lo golpee, y lo golpee y lo golpee. La gente tiene que aprender a amarlo o a dejarlo”.

La desconsolada madre ofreció una pequeña nota de consolación. “Está en un mejor lugar, donde no hay odio”.


DSC_1623webPara ayuda e información

Cualquier residente de la comunidad que necesite asistencia e información puede llegar a las siguientes organizaciones:

Harlem Pride
347.846.0362
www.harlempride.org

El Instituto The Hetrick-Martin
2 Astor Place
New York, NY 10003
212.674.2400
www.hmi.org

Gay Men of African Descent (GMAD)
44 Calle Court #1000
Brooklyn, NY 11201
718.222.6300
www.gmad.org

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker