A found fortune
Una fortuna encontrada

  • English
  • Español

A found fortune

Story, photos and video by Sherry Mazzocchi

Lilli and Charles Friedman are survivors of Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass. </br><i>Photo: Sherry Mazzocchi </i>

Lilli and Charles Friedman are survivors of Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass.
Photo: Sherry Mazzocchi

Lilli and Charles (née Carl) are the lucky ones.

On the morning of Nov. 8, 1938, Lilli Meseritz’s 72-year-old grandmother answered the door. Two uniformed Nazi officers strode into the family’s Berlin apartment. They had papers ordering the arrest of Lilli’s father.

The custom of the day obliged Lilli, 13, to curtsy to the Nazis. Her grandmother explained that Lilli’s father was away on business. Appealing to whatever shred of humanity the men might have possessed, she said her son-in-law was a good father to the young girl, a family man and a loving husband to her daughter.

The Nazis responded by saying they’d be back.

Carl Heinz Friedmann lived with his parents and brother in Yena, a German university town. On the evening of Nov. 9th, 1938, he and his brother went to sleep, but woke to the sounds of screams and breaking glass.

Their parents managed to give the young boys keys to the house and the safe just before being arrested and taken to Gestapo headquarters.

Carl and Lilli both survived Kristallnacht, or Night of Broken Glass.

Nov. 9 is the 75th anniversary of the pogrom. That night, civilians and Nazi paramilitary forces conducted a systematic destruction of Jewish homes, property and synagogues all over Nazi-occupied Germany and Austria.

This year, the Hebrew Tabernacle commemorates Kristallnacht with special services and events, including a talk by Dr. Ruth Westheimer, a major art exhibit and a screening of About Face, a documentary about German Jewish refugees who fought in Europe as members of the Allied forces.

The Hebrew Tabernacle will commemorate Kristallnacht with special services and events, including an art exhibit and documentary screening. </br><i>Photo: Courtesy of Hebrew Tabernacle </i>

The Hebrew Tabernacle will commemorate Kristallnacht with special services and events, including an art exhibit and documentary screening.
Photo: Courtesy of Hebrew Tabernacle

Eight survivors, including the Friedmans, are featured in the show, “Experiencing a Time of War and Beyond: Portraits of Spirited Holocaust Survivors.”

“It’s our honor to be able to commemorate this day with the survivors and their families,” said Regina Gradess, co-curator of the Hebrew Tabernacle’s Armin and Estelle Gold Wing Gallery.

The show incorporates the work of three artists. Sculptor Peter Bulow and two photographers, Roj Rodríguez and Yael Ben-Zion, created images of each of the survivors. Art creates the inner souls of people, said Gradess. “I’m hoping that people who come and view this art exhibit will find the courage that our survivors found.”

“These people, somehow, managed to put the war behind them and start a new life,” she said.

Rabbi Jeffrey Gale said it’s important to remember Kristallnacht to ensure it never happens again. “There’s that old cliché; those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it,” he said.

The Hebrew Tabernacle’s Holocaust community is aging, with most in their mid-80’s or older. “The next time there is a significant observance of Kristallnacht, this generation is not going to be around,” said Gale. “So this is perhaps one of the last opportunities to have an event where people are telling their story.”

The Meseritz family fled to England in 1939, arriving just as England and France declared war on Germany. They stayed in London with a friend, Juana Harpman, until they arranged passage to America. Their grandmother remained in Germany. She died in an old age home, of natural causes.

This portrait by photographer Roj Rodríguez will be part of the exhibit. </br><i>Photo: Roj Rodriguez </i>

This portrait by photographer Roj Rodríguez will be part of the exhibit.
Photo: Roj Rodriguez

Carl Friedmann’s mother returned home the day after Kristallnacht. His father arrived home two months later, beaten and thinner. In 1941, the Friedmanns got on a train in Berlin that went west instead of east. “It cost a lot of money – or bribe – or whatever you want to call it,” he recalled.

The train, which was sealed and had no sanitary provisions, stopped briefly in Paris. HIAS, an international Jewish organization that protects refugees, gave them bread. They were told not to eat it all, but to share it with the train operators. After they reached Barcelona, the Friedmanns took a Spanish freighter carrying hundreds of other refugees to the United States.

They arrived at Bush Terminal in Brooklyn two and a half weeks later. Friedmann saw the Statue of Liberty for the first time on his 14th birthday. They had run out of food two days before. Their father asked the people who meet them at the boat if they had food for his two sons.

“Of course we have food,” they said. “This is America.”

In the 1940’s, the U.S. also had anti-German sentiment. The family dropped the extra n in their name, from Friedmann to Friedman, and Carl’s name changed to Charles.

Both Lilli and Charles’ families moved to Washington Heights. George Washington High School was filled with German-speaking Jewish refugees.

“These people, somehow, managed to put the war behind them and start a new life,” said Regina Gradess, co-curator of the Hebrew Tabernacle’s Armin and Estelle Gold Wing Gallery. </br><i>Photo: Courtesy of Hebrew Tabernacle </i>

“These people, somehow, managed to put the war behind them and start a new life,” said Regina Gradess, co-curator of the Hebrew Tabernacle’s Armin and Estelle Gold Wing Gallery.
Photo: Courtesy of Hebrew Tabernacle

“You could go from 181st Street to 155 Street and not speak a word of English,” Friedman said. “Today, that’s changed a little bit.”

Lilli and Charles attended school at the same time, but didn’t know each other. They would meet a decade after graduation, on a skiing trip.

They married six months later.

The Friedmans say they are the lucky ones because six million others never made it out of Nazi-occupied Europe alive. Most of their own family members were lost or died in concentration camps.

Rabbi Gale said remembering Kristallnacht is very important, but it’s also important to observe Shabbat, holidays and Jewish rituals in the home. He said anti-Semitism should never overwhelm Judaism or negate the merits of the faith itself.

“It’s a mitzvah to remember,” he said. “But it’s also a mitzvah to move on; to learn from what we remember, to live our Judaism in the present and to prepare for the future.”

Hebrew Tabernacle’s observance of the 75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht begins Friday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 pm with Shabbat services honoring those who were present during Kristallnacht. The service features special guest speakers, including Dr. Ruth Westheimer. After the service, everyone is invited to the art opening. The event continues on Saturday, Nov. 9th at 10 am. After Shabbat services and a luncheon, there will be a screening of the film About Face.

For more from Lilli Friedman, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_174.

Una fortuna encontrada

Historia, fotos y video por Sherry Mazzocchi

Lilli y Charles Friedman sobrevivieron Kristallnacht, o la Noche de los Cristales Rotos. </br><i>Foto: Sherry Mazzocchi </i>

Lilli y Charles Friedman sobrevivieron Kristallnacht, o la Noche de los Cristales Rotos.
Foto: Sherry Mazzocchi

Lilli y Charles (nacido como Carl) son afortunados.

En la mañana del 8 de noviembre de 1938, Lilli Meseritz, una abuela de 72 años de edad, abrió la puerta. Dos oficiales con uniforme nazis se dirigieron al departamento de la familia en Berlín. Tenían documentos que ordenaban el arresto del padre de Lilli.

La costumbre de la época obligó a Lilli, de 13 años de edad, a hacer una reverencia a los nazis. Su abuela explicó que el padre de Lilli estaba fuera por negocios. Apelando a cualquier atisbo de humanidad que los hombres pudieran poseer, dijo que su yerno era un buen padre para la joven, un hombre de familia y un esposo amoroso para su hija.

Los nazis respondieron diciendo que volverían.

Carl Heinz Friedmann vivía con sus padres y su hermano en Yena, una ciudad universitaria alemana. En la noche del 9 de noviembre 1938, él y su hermano se fueron a dormir, pero despertaron con el sonido de gritos y cristales rotos.

Sus padres lograron dar a los jóvenes chicos las llaves de la casa y de la caja fuerte justo antes de ser detenidos y llevados a la sede de la Gestapo.

Carl y Lilli ambos sobrevivieron Kristallnacht o la Noche de los Cristales Rotos.

El 9 de noviembre es el 75 º aniversario de la matanza. Esa noche, los civiles y las fuerzas paramilitares nazis llevaron a cabo una destrucción sistemática de los hogares judíos, los bienes y las sinagogas en toda la ocupación nazi en Alemania y Austria.

Este año, el Tabernáculo Hebreo conmemora Kristallnacht con servicios y eventos especiales, incluyendo una charla de la Dra. Ruth Westheimer, una importante exposición de arte y una proyección de About Face, un documental sobre los refugiados judíos alemanes que lucharon en Europa como miembros de las fuerzas aliadas.

Este año, el Tabernáculo Hebreo conmemora Kristallnacht con servicios y eventos especiales, incluyendo una exhibicion de arte y el documental <i>About Face</i>.</br><i>Foto: Cortesía del Tabernáculo Hebreo </i>

Este año, el Tabernáculo Hebreo conmemora Kristallnacht con servicios y eventos especiales, incluyendo una exhibicion de arte y el documental About Face.
Foto: Cortesía del Tabernáculo Hebreo

Ocho sobrevivientes, entre ellos los Friedman, son presentados en el show “Experiencing a Time of War and Beyond: Portraits of Spirited Holocaust Survivors.”

“Es un honor para nosotros ser capaces de conmemorar este día con los sobrevivientes y sus familias”, dijo Regina Gradess, co-curadora de la galería Tabernáculo Hebreo Armin y Estelle Gold Wing.

El programa incorpora la obra de tres artistas. El escultor Peter Bulow y dos fotógrafos, Roj Rodríguez y Yael Ben-Zion, crearon imágenes de cada uno de los sobrevivientes. El arte crea las almas interiores de las personas, dijo Gradess. “Espero que la gente que venga y vea esta exposición encuentre el valor que nuestros sobrevivientes encontraron”.

“Estas personas -de alguna manera- lograron poner la guerra detrás de ellos y comenzar una nueva vida”, dijo.

El rabino Jeffrey Gale dijo que es importante recordar Kristallnacht para asegurarse de que no vuelva a suceder. “Ahí está ese viejo cliché: los que no conocen la historia están condenados a repetirla”, dijo.

La comunidad del Holocausto Tabernáculo Hebreo está envejeciendo, la mayoría a mediados de los años 80 o mayores. “La próxima vez que haya una celebración importante de Kristallnacht, esta generación no va a estar cerca”, dijo Gale. “Así que esta es quizás una de las últimas oportunidades de tener un evento donde la gente cuente su historia”.

La familia Meseritz huyó a Inglaterra en 1939, llegando al momento en que Inglaterra y Francia declaraban la guerra a Alemania. Se quedaron en Londres con una amiga, Juana Harpman, hasta que consiguieron pasajes a Estados Unidos. Su abuela se quedó en Alemania. Ella murió en un hogar para ancianos de causas naturales.

Este retrato por el fotografo Roj Rodríguez sera parte de la exhibicion. </br><i>Foto: Roj Rodriguez </i>

Este retrato por el fotografo Roj Rodríguez sera parte de la exhibicion.
Foto: Roj Rodriguez

La madre de Carl Friedmann volvió a casa el día después de Kristallnacht. Su padre llegó a casa dos meses después, golpeado y más delgado. En 1941, los Friedmann subieron a un tren en Berlín, que fue al oeste en lugar de este. “Nos costó un montón de dinero, o sobornos o como quieras llamarlo”, recordó.

El tren, que fue sellado y no tenía disposiciones sanitarias, se detuvo brevemente en París. HlAS, una organización judía internacional que protege a los refugiados, les dio pan. Se les dijo que no lo comieran todo, sino que lo compartieran con los operadores de trenes. Después de llegar a Barcelona, los Friedmann tomaron un buque de carga español que llevaba a cientos de otros refugiados a los Estados Unidos.

Llegaron a la terminal Bush en Brooklyn, dos y media semanas después. Friedmann vio la estatua de la libertad por primera vez en su cumpleaños número 14. Se habían quedado sin comida dos días antes. Su padre le preguntó a la gente que conocían en el barco si tenían comida para sus dos hijos.

“Por supuesto que tenemos comida”, dijeron. “Esto es Estados Unidos”.

En la década de 1940, los Estados Unidos también tenía el sentimiento anti-alemán. La familia eliminó la n extra en su nombre, de Friedmann pasó a Friedman, y el nombre de Carl cambió a Charles.

Tanto las familias de Charles como de Lilli se mudaron a Washington Heights. La escuela secundaria George Washington estaba llena de refugiados judíos de habla alemana.

"Estas personas -de alguna manera- lograron poner la guerra detrás de ellos y comenzar una nueva vida", dijo Regina Grades,  co-curadora de la galería Tabernáculo Hebreo Armin y Estelle Gold Wing. </br><i> Foto: Cortesía del Tabernáculo Hebreo </i>

“Estas personas -de alguna manera- lograron poner la guerra detrás de ellos y comenzar una nueva vida”, dijo Regina Grades, co-curadora de la galería Tabernáculo Hebreo Armin y Estelle Gold Wing.
Foto: Cortesía del Tabernáculo Hebreo

“Podía ir desde la calle 181 a la 155 y no escuchar una palabra de inglés”, dijo Friedman. “Hoy, eso ha cambiado un poco”.

Lilli y Charles asistieron a la escuela al mismo tiempo, pero no se conocieron. Se reunirían una década después de su graduación en un viaje de esquí.

Se casaron seis meses después.

Los Friedman dicen que son afortunados porque otros seis millones nunca lograron salir de la ocupación nazi en Europa con vida. La mayor parte de sus propias familias se perdieron o murieron en campos de concentración.

El rabino Gale dijo que recordar Kristallnacht es muy importante, pero también es importante observar el Shabat, los días de fiesta y los rituales judíos en el hogar. Dijo que el antisemitismo no debe desbordar el judaísmo o negar los méritos de la propia fe.

“Es un mitzvá para recordar”, dijo “Pero también es un mitzvá para seguir adelante, para aprender de lo que recordamos, para vivir nuestro judaísmo en el presente y prepararnos para el futuro”.

La celebración del 75 aniversario de Kristallnacht del Tabernáculo Hebreo comienza el viernes 8 de noviembre a las 7:30 pm con servicios de Shabat en honor a los que estaban presentes durante Kristallnacht. El servicio cuenta con invitados especiales, entre ellos la Dra. Ruth Westheimer. Después del servicio, todos están invitados a la exposición de arte. El evento continúa el sábado 9 de noviembre a las 10 de la manana. Después de los servicios de Shabat y un almuerzo, habrá una proyección del filme About Face.

Para más información sobre Lilli Friedman, por favor visite http://bit.ly/MT_174.