A “damning” disparity
Una disparidad “irrefutable”

  • English
  • Español

A “damning” disparity

Billion-dollar wage gap for NYC women persists

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

“It is pretty damning,” said Public Advocate Letitia James (center).

“It is pretty damning,” said Public Advocate Letitia James (center).

Mind the gap.

Women in New York City earn about $5.8 billion less than men in wages each year, according to a new report issued by Public Advocate Letitia “Tish” James.

The report revealed that women working in New York City government experience a gender wage gap three times larger than women working in the private sector, and two-and-a-half times larger than women working for nonprofits.

“The very government that is supposed to protect our equal rights is the biggest culprit of them all,” charged James.

She announced the report’s findings during a press conference on April 11 – one day before National Equal Pay Day – where she was joined by advocates for equal wages.

“New York City is a place where trends are set, but when it comes to pay quality, the city is in the Stone Age,” remarked Penny Venitis, Executive Vice President of Legal Momentum.

The city’s pay gap is even wider when it comes to women of color.

According to the report, Latina women fare the worst.

They are paid 46 cents for every dollar their white male coworkers make, while black women get paid 55 cents and Asian women get paid 63 cents.

Additionally, the report detailed that wage disparities for women of color in New York City are significantly worse than the national average.

Staff Attorney Phoebe Taubman said the gender pay gap widens as a women gets older.

Staff Attorney Phoebe Taubman said the gender pay gap widens as a women gets older.

“It is alarming that the disparity is even greater for women of color in a city that is supposed to be the most diverse,” stated Jacqueline Ebanks, Executive Director of the Women’s City Club of New York.

James’ report outlined several recommendations for closing the gender wage gap ― the Public Advocate wants to prohibit city agencies from asking for previous salary information of job applicants, and ensure that agencies provide a salary range to applicants in job announcements and advertisements.

She also urged private employers to discontinue requesting previous salary information from applicants.

Additionally, James called for the creation of an Equitable Pay and Opportunity Task Force, suggested that employers improve family-friendly work arranges, and said she wants to encourage city contractor to disclose wage information about their employees.

“This is not a new problem,” said James. “We cannot wait any longer to fix it and must take proactive steps.”

The report incorporated U.S. Census data from the past five years, explained James. While the report contained no specific details on the city agencies with the biggest pay disparities, James said that the task force would take a closer look at data regarding wage gaps at particular city agencies.

Phoebe Taubman, Senior Staff Attorney of advocacy group A Better Balance, commented that workplace data indicates that the gender pay gap widens as a women gets older.

“This reflects a persistent motherhood bias in the workplace,” Taubman said.

James’ recommendation to improve family-friendly policies was praised by Gina Strickland, Vice President of public sector workers union Local 1180.

“Too many of our members with children have trouble with child care, and the flexibility of work hours is not there, and they’re subject to discipline if they don’t work,” said Strickland.

“It is pretty damning,” James said of the numbers outlined in her report. “Companies are not paying women equal pay for equal work. That’s why we are making these recommendations.”

James also pointed out that Minority and Woman-owned Businesses (M/WBEs) are also struggling for contract opportunities – despite increased efforts by the city to improve policies that once hindered M/WBEs.

In 2015, only 5.3 percent of the city’s $13.8 billion procurement budget went to M/WBEs.

“It is alarming that the disparity is even greater for women of color,” stated Jacqueline Ebanks, Executive Director of the Women's City Club of New York.

“It is alarming that the disparity is even greater for women of color,” stated Jacqueline Ebanks, Executive Director of the Women’s City Club of New York.

James said that she has urged the de Blasio administration to hire a diversity officer for the city.

While Counsel to the Mayor Maya Wiley deals with M/WBE issues, she is also involved in many other projects, said James.

“We need a full-time, around-the-clock diversity officer to look at every agency and make recommendations,” James remarked.

For the full report, please visit http://on.nyc.gov/1N6g6E2

Una disparidad “irrefutable”

Brecha salarial de mil millones de dólares para las mujeres persiste en NYC

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

“When it comes to pay quality, the city is in the Stone Age,” said Penny Venitis, Executive Vice President of Legal Momentum.

“Cuando se trata de igualdad, la ciudad está en la Edad de Piedra”, dijo Penny Venitis, vicepresidenta ejecutiva de Legal Momentum.

Cuidado con la brecha.

Las mujeres en la ciudad de Nueva York ganan alrededor de $5.8 mil millones de dólares menos que los hombres en salarios cada año, de acuerdo con un nuevo informe publicado por la defensora pública Letitia “Tish” James.

El informe reveló que las mujeres que trabajan en el gobierno de la ciudad de Nueva York experimentan una brecha salarial de género tres veces mayor que las mujeres que trabajan en el sector privado, y dos veces y media mayor que las mujeres que trabajan para organizaciones no lucrativas.

“El mismo gobierno que se supone debe proteger nuestros derechos es el mayor culpable”, acusó James.

Anunció los resultados del informe durante una conferencia de prensa el 11 de abril -un día antes del Día Nacional de Igualdad de Pago- en el que estuvo acompañada por defensores de la igualdad de salarios.

“Nueva York es un lugar en el que se establecen tendencias, pero cuando se trata de igualdad, la ciudad está en la Edad de Piedra”, comentó Penny Venitis, vicepresidenta ejecutiva de Legal Momentum.

La brecha salarial de la ciudad es aún mayor cuando se trata de mujeres de color.

Según el informe, a las mujeres latinas les va peor.

Se les paga 46 centavos por cada dólar que sus compañeros de trabajo blancos ganan, mientras que a las mujeres negras se les paga 55 centavos y a las mujeres asiáticas, 63 centavos por dólar.

Además, el informe detalla que las disparidades salariales para las mujeres de color en la ciudad de Nueva York son significativamente peores que el promedio nacional.

“Es alarmante que la disparidad sea aún mayor para las mujeres de color en una ciudad que se supone es la más diversa”, declaró Jacqueline Ebanks, directora ejecutiva del City Club de Mujeres de Nueva York.

El informe de James esbozó varias recomendaciones para cerrar la brecha salarial de género. La defensora pública quiere prohibir a las agencias de la ciudad el pedir información sobre el salario previo de los solicitantes de empleo y garantizar que proporcionen un rango de sueldo a los solicitantes de empleo en los anuncios y la publicidad.

Asimismo, instó a los empleadores privados a suspender las peticiones de información de los salarios anteriores de los solicitantes.

Además, James pidió la creación de un pago equitativo y una fuerza de trabajo de oportunidades, sugiriendo que los empleadores mejoren los arreglos de trabajo favorables para la familia, y dijo que quiere animar a los contratistas de la ciudad para que revelen la información de los salarios de sus empleados.

“Este no es un problema nuevo,” dijo James. “No podemos esperar más tiempo para arreglarlo. Hay que tomar medidas proactivas”.

El informe incorpora los datos del censo de Estados Unidos de los últimos cinco años, explicó James. Si bien el informe no contiene detalles específicos sobre las agencias de la ciudad con las mayores diferencias de salarios, James dijo que el grupo de trabajo podría echar un vistazo más de cerca a los datos relativos a las diferencias salariales en agencias particulares de la ciudad.

“It is alarming that the disparity is even greater for women of color,” stated Jacqueline Ebanks, Executive Director of the Women's City Club of New York.

“Es alarmante que la disparidad sea aún mayor para las mujeres de color”, declaró Jacqueline Ebanks, directora ejecutiva del City Club de Mujeres de Nueva York.

Phoebe Taubman, abogada principal del grupo de defensa A Better Balance, comentó que la información del lugar de trabajo indica que la brecha salarial de género se ensancha en la medida en que una mujer envejece.

“Esto refleja un sesgo persistente de la maternidad en el lugar de trabajo”, dijo Taubman.

La recomendación de James para mejorar las políticas favorables a la familia fue elogiada por Gina Strickland, vicepresidenta del sindicato de trabajadores del sector público Local 1180.

“Muchos de nuestros miembros con niños tienen problemas con el cuidado infantil y la flexibilidad de las horas de trabajo no existe, además son sujetos a disciplina si no trabajan”, dijo Strickland.

“Son bastante concluyentes”, dijo James sobre los números indicados en su informe. “Las empresas no le están pagando a las mujeres el mismo salario por el mismo trabajo. Es por eso que estamos haciendo estas recomendaciones”.

James también señaló que las empresas propiedad de mujeres y minorías (M/WBE por sus siglas en inglés) están luchando por oportunidades de contrato, a pesar de un mayor esfuerzo por parte de la ciudad para mejorar las políticas que antes obstaculizaban a las M/WBE.

En 2015, sólo el 5.3 por ciento del presupuesto de adquisiciones de $13.8 millones de dólares de la ciudad fue para empresas M/WBE.

James dijo que ella ha instado a la administración de Blasio a contratar a un representante de la diversidad para la ciudad.

Como asesora del alcalde, Maya Wiley aborda cuestiones M/WBE, y también está involucrada en muchos otros proyectos, dijo James.

“Necesitamos un representante de la diversidad de tiempo completo, que observe cada agencia y haga recomendaciones”, comentó James.

Para el informe completo, visite http://on.nyc.gov/1N6g6E2