“Brides” in white – and in step – march against violence

“Novias” en Blanco y en Fila Marchan contra la Violencia

  • English
  • Español

“Brides” in white – and in step – march against violence

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi and Debralee Santos
Photos by Sherry Mazzocchi

Rising early in the day, Josie Ashton took care in donning the white wedding dress. Cloaked in her formal attire, she traveled to Fort Washington Presbyterian Church in Washington Heights, where she was greeted by others who had gathered together to mark the special day.

But there was no groom at the altar, or limousine to ferry her to a reception afterwards.

Instead, Ashton was met at the church by a sea of other women, hundreds of them, also dressed in white formal silk and satin white gowns, who turned heads as they marched the seven miles to Saint Cecilia’s Church in The Bronx.

There were also some men who walked beside them, but it was the small army of white-clad women that dominated.

Emily Quinn attended the Brides March in protest against domestic violence, and is shown here at the Fort Washington Presbyterian Church. “I think anything that hurts other people hurts us all,” she said. “In this city, it's often women [victims] in situations where they can't get out, and they need to know that we are there for them."

Emily Quinn attended the Brides March in protest against domestic violence, and is shown here at the Fort Washington Presbyterian Church. “I think anything that hurts other people hurts us all,” she said. “In this city, it’s often women [victims] in situations where they can’t get out, and they need to know that we are there for them.”

Ashton and the others made the trek from one church in northern Manhattan to another in The Bronx to honor the memory of Gladys Ricart, as well as many of their own loved ones – or themselves – who have suffered with domestic violence.

“Gladys Ricart was an amazing woman,” said Ashton, founder of the annual Gladys Ricart and Victims of Domestic Violence Memorial Walk, also known as the Brides March.  Ricart was shot and killed on her wedding day, on September 26th in 1999 by her former boyfriend Agustin Garcia.

Ashton explains she was disturbed at the time by news reports that portrayed Garcia as the victim. Her disquiet led her to create the Brides March, now in its 11th year, to bring attention to domestic violence, which often goes undetected until it is too late.

“It’s become an international movement,” Ashton said. “We have thousands of women walking in different parts of the world and in different states of America.”

Speaking at the invocation before the march, New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn said the numbers of people who die from domestic violence each year do not tell the whole story.

“There are countless people who have been beaten, permanently and physically injured, and permanently and emotionally scarred; there are children who have watched this happen and will have to live with that for the rest of their lives,” she said.

The sight of the women marching in wedding dresses would raise awareness about domestic violence, and affirm for those who suffer silently that their lives and their children’s lives matter, Quinn said. She added that the march could also serve as a reminder to call the police when domestic violence occurs.

“[Of the] over 70 percent of the family-related homicides in 2010, those families never called the police,” Quinn said.

The story of Gladys Ricart echoed this tragic pattern.

After Ricart had ended the relationship with Garcia, she declined to press charges against him after he broke into her home. Nor did she get an order of protection after he called her repeatedly, stalked her and left roses on her lawn and a bible on her doorstep.

Ricart came to the U.S. from Tamboril, in the Dominican Republic, with her son. She found work at a travel agency. After getting an accounting degree, she was promoted to accounts payable manager.

She dated Agustin Garcia, a New Jersey resident with businesses in Washington Heights, but their romance was soon marked by his stalking and harassment. Ricart broke off their seven-year relationship, and later met and became engaged to James Preston, Jr.

On Sept. 26th, 1999, Ricart, dressed in her wedding gown, was handing out bouquets to her bridesmaids when Garcia entered her home at 4 pm, shortly before the wedding.

Her fiancée, James Preston, awaited her at the church in Flushing, Queens.

Garcia walked into Ricart’s living room wearing a suit and carrying a briefcase, telling guests he was invited.

He pulled out a .38 caliber handgun and shot five times. Three bullets hit Ricart, killing her instantly.

The murder was captured on videotape and the image of Ricart being gunned down in her wedding gown just before the ceremony was broadcast internationally. Ricart’s body was escorted back to Tamboril by her fiancé and family, where she was buried.

“He doesn’t remember the gun going off,” said attorney Fernando Oliver in 2001, during the trial of Agustin Garcia, who pleaded innocent to the murder charges. At the time, Oliver argued that Garcia had acted in self-defense. Garcia claimed he couldn’t remember much of the “incident” and that he had been jumped at Ricart’s home by wedding guests.

Garcia was ultimately convicted of Ricart’s murder, and is serving life in prison.

Ricart was waked and buried in the same dress and tiara she intended to be wed in.

“She will be buried in the same gown, and the bridesmaids and groomsmen will be dressed in the clothes they would have worn to the wedding,” explained Eva Ricart, a cousin, during the wake, days afterwards in October 1999.

There have been many more victims since then, as was noted by those marching.

As did many of the other “Brides” this past Monday, Emily Quinn had attached laminated news stories about domestic violence to her wedding dress.

“Every year at the beginning of the year, I start to cut out all of these articles. And every year, I have a new group of articles of women who have been killed,” she said. “We have a face out there so…that these women can be remembered.”

Josie Ashton, wearing the black head scarf, explains that she began the Brides March when, after Ricart’s death, she felt the slain bride was being re-victimized by misrepresentations. Now in its 11th year, the march has grown. “It’s become an international movement,” Ashton said. “We have thousands of women walking in different parts of the world and in different states of America.”

Josie Ashton, wearing the black head scarf, explains that she began the Brides March when, after Ricart’s death, she felt the slain bride was being re-victimized by misrepresentations. Now in its 11th year, the march has grown. “It’s become an international movement,” Ashton said. “We have thousands of women walking in different parts of the world and in different states of America.”

Quinn believes that the harm caused by domestic violence transcends the people immediately affected.

“I think it’s personally important to every human being on the planet,” she said. “I don’t have a personal stake. I think anything that hurts other people hurts us all.

At the end of the seven mile march, Ashton, Quinn and the other “Brides” were greeted by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.

Diaz, who addressed the women in white in both English and Spanish, said that their march was a powerful reminder to the city of New York of what happened on Ricart‘s wedding day and to break the silence of domestic violence.

“It plagues us in our most sacred places—in our homes, and with our most sacred people—our families,” Diaz said.

Ashton said that ten years in, the work of the Brides March is only just beginning. She said that children growing up violent homes often become victims or abusers.

“We have a lot of men who are being abused, We have same-sex relationships where there’s tons of abuse, “ she said, “and we’re just pretending it’s not there because there’s so much shame around it—because we’re still blaming the victim.”

To see the Brides March through northern Manhattan and The Bronx, and to listen to Josie Ashton speak about Gladys Ricart and the fight against domestic violence, please visit http://bit.ly/MTV004

 

“Novias” en Blanco y en Fila Marchan contra la Violencia

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi and Debralee Santos
Fotos por Sherry Mazzocchi

Desde temprano en el día, Josie Ashton se encargó de ponerse el blanco vestido de novia. Envuelta en su atuendo formal, viajó a la Iglesia Presbiteriana Fort Washington en Washington Heights, donde fue recibida por otras que se habían reunido para celebrar el día especial.

Pero no había novio en el altar, o limosina para llevarla luego a una recepción. En su lugar, Ashton se reunió en la iglesia con un mar de otras mujeres, cientos de ellas, también vestidas con vestidos formales blancos, quienes viraban las cabezas mientras marchaban las siete millas hasta la Iglesia Saint Cecilia en el Bronx.

También hubo algunos hombres que marcharon al lado de ellas, pero era un pequeño ejército de mujeres en blanco lo que dominaba.

Josie Ashton, wearing the black head scarf, explains that she began the Brides March when, after Ricart’s death, she felt the slain bride was being re-victimized by misrepresentations. Now in its 11th year, the march has grown. “It’s become an international movement,” Ashton said. “We have thousands of women walking in different parts of the world and in different states of America.”

Josie Ashton, vistiendo una bufanda negra, explica que ella comenzó la Marcha de las Novias cuando luego de la muerte de Ricart, ella sintió que la novia estaba siendo re-victimizada por malas interpretaciones. Ahora en su año 11, la marcha ha crecido. “Ha pasado a ser un movimiento internacional”, dijo Ashton. “Tenemos miles de mujeres caminando en diferentes partes del mundo y en diferentes estados de América”.

Ashton y las otras hicieron el viaje desde una iglesia en el Norte de Manhattan hasta otra en el Bronx para honrar la memoria de Gladys Ricart, como también muchos de sus seres queridos – o ellas mismas – que han sufrido de violencia doméstica.

“Gladys Ricart era una mujer increíble”, dijo Ashton, fundadora de la Caminata Anual de Gladys Ricart y Víctimas de la Violencia Doméstica, también conocida como la Marcha de las Novias. Ricart fue baleada y asesinada el día de su boda, el 26 de septiembre de 1999 por su antiguo novio Agustín García.

Ashton explica que ella estaba turbada en el momento por los reportes de noticias que presentaban a García como la víctima. Su inquietud la llevó a crear la Marcha de las Novias, ahora en su unduodécimo año (11), para llevar atención a la violencia doméstica, la cual a menudo no se detecta hasta que es muy tarde.

“Ha pasado a ser un movimiento internacional”, dijo Ashton. “Tenemos miles de mujeres caminando en diferentes partes del mundo y en diferentes estados de América”.

Hablando en la invocación antes de la marcha, la Portavoz del Concejo de la ciudad de Nueva York Christine Quinn dijo que el número de personas que muere por violencia doméstica cada año no cuenta la historia completa.

“Hay un sinnúmero de personas que han sido golpeadas, lesionadas permanentemente y físicamente, y marcadas emocionalmente; hay niños que han visto esto suceder y tienen que vivir con eso por el resto de sus vidas”, dijo ella.

La visión de las mujeres marchando en vestidos de novias levantará conciencia acerca de la violencia doméstica, y afirmar para aquellos que sufren en silencio que sus vidas y las vidas de sus hijos importan, dijo Quinn. Añadió que la marcha también podría servir como un recordatorio para llamar a la policía cuando ocurre la violencia doméstica.

“Sobre el 70 por ciento de los homicidios relacionados con familias en el 2010, esas familias nunca llamaron a la policía”, dijo Quinn.

La historia de Gladys Ricart hace eco a este trágico patrón.

Luego de que Ricart terminara la relación con García, ella se negó a poner cargos contra él, luego de que el irrumpiera en su hogar. Tampoco puso una orden de protección luego de el llamarla repetidamente, seguirla y dejarle rosas en su patio y una biblia en su puerta.

Ricart vino a los E.U. desde Tamboril en la República Dominicana, con su hijo. Encontró trabajo en una agencia de viajes. Luego de recibir un grado en contabilidad, fue promovida a gerente de cuentas por pagar.

Ella salió con Agustín García, residente de New Jersey con negocios en Washington Heights, pero su romance pronto fue marcado por su persecución y hostigamiento. Ricart rompió su relación de siete años, y más tarde conoció y se comprometió con James Preston, Jr. El 26 de septiembre de 1999, Ricart, vestida con su traje de novia, estaba entregando los ramos de flores a sus damas de honor cuando García entró a su casa a las 4 p.m., un poco antes de la boda. Su prometido, James Preston, esperaba por ella en la iglesia en Flushing, Queens.

García entró a la sala de Ricart vistiendo un traje y cargando un maletín, diciéndoles a los invitados que estaba invitado.

Sacó un arma calibre .38 y disparó cinco veces. Tres balas le dieron a Ricart, matándola instantáneamente.

El asesinato fue capturado en video y la imagen de Ricart siendo asesinada en su vestido de novia justo antes de la ceremonia fue transmitida internacionalmente. El cuerpo de Ricart fue escoltado de vuelta a Tamboril por su prometido y su familia, donde fue sepultada.

“El no recuerda que la pistola se disparara”, dijo el fiscal Fernando Oliver en el 2001, durante el juicio de Agustín García, quien se declaró inocente a los cargos de asesinato. En ese momento, Oliver argumentaba que García había actuado en defensa propia. García decía que no podía recordar mucho del incidente y que había sido asaltado en la casa de Ricart por invitados de la boda.

Finalmente García fue acusado por el asesinato de Ricart y está sirviendo cadena perpetua en prisión. Ricart fue sepultada en el mismo traje y tiara que intentaba utilizar para casarse. “Será enterrada con el mismo vestido, y las damas de honor y los padrinos en la ropa que tenían que utilizar para la boda”, explicó Eva Ricart, una prima, durante el velatorio, días después en octubre de 1999.

Han habido muchas víctimas desde entonces, como fue señalado por aquellas marchando.

Como hicieron muchas de las otras “Novias” este pasado lunes, Emily Quinn había pegado nuevas historias acerca de violencia doméstica a su vestido de novia.

“Cada año a principios del año, comienzo a recortar todos estos artículos. Y cada año, tengo un nuevo grupo de artículos de mujeres que han sido asesinadas”, dijo ella. “Tenemos una cara allá afuera…que estas mujeres pueden ser recordadas”.

Quinn cree que el daño causado por la violencia doméstica transciende a las personas directamente afectadas.

“Pienso que es personalmente importante para cada ser humano en el planeta”, dijo ella. “No tengo un interés personal. Pienso que cualquier cosa que hiere a otra persona nos hiere a todos.

Emily Quinn attended the Brides March in protest against domestic violence, and is shown here at the Fort Washington Presbyterian Church. “I think anything that hurts other people hurts us all,” she said. “In this city, it's often women [victims] in situations where they can't get out, and they need to know that we are there for them."

Emily Quinn asistió a la Marcha de las Novias en protesta contra la violencia doméstica, y es mostrada aquí en la Iglesia Presbiteriana Fort Washington. “Pienso que cualquier cosa que hiere a otra persona nos hiere a nosotros”, dijo ella. “En esta ciudad, a menudo las mujeres son víctimas en situaciones de donde no pueden salir, y necesitan saber que estamos ahí para ellas”.

Al final de esta marcha de siete millas, Ashton, Quinn y las otras “Novias” fueron recibidas por el presidente del condado del Bronx, Rubén Díaz, Jr.

Díaz, quien se dirigió a las mujeres en blanco en inglés y en español, dijo que su marcha era un poderoso recordatorio a la ciudad de Nueva York de lo que le sucedió a Ricart en el día de su boda y para romper el silencio de la violencia doméstica.

“Nos plaga en nuestros lugares más sagrados – en nuestros hogares, y con nuestras personas más sagradas – nuestras familias”, dijo Díaz.

Ashton dijo que con diez años ahí, el trabajo de la Marcha de las Novias sólo ha comenzado. Ella dijo que los niños creciendo en hogares violentos a menudo pasan a ser víctimas o abusadores.

“Tenemos muchos hombres que están siendo abusados, tenemos relaciones del mismo sexo donde hay toneladas de abuso”, dijo ella, “y solo estamos pretendiendo que no está ahí porque hay tanta vergüenza alrededor de ello – porque seguimos culpando a la víctima”.

Para ver la Marcha de las Novias en el Norte de Manhattan y el Bronx, y para escuchar a Josie Ashton hablar acerca de Gladys Ricart y la lucha contra la violencia doméstica, favor de visitar http://bit.ly/MTV004