“We’ve been to war together”
“Estuvimos juntos en la guerra”

  • English
  • Español

“We’ve been to war together”

Reiki healing at the hospital

Story, photos and video by Sherry Mazzocchi

“Some of my colleagues think I’ve lost it,” said Dr. Sheldon Feldman, Chief of Breast Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center.

“Some of my colleagues think I’ve lost it,” said Dr. Sheldon Feldman, Chief of Breast Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center.

When Susan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer, she was devastated. She hadn’t even felt particularly ill, but she had an aggressive cancer that had already spread to her lungs.

That meant she wasn’t a candidate for surgery. Even with chemotherapy, the oncologist said she only had a two percent chance of survival.

Susan (who didn’t want to use her real name) was scheduled for a battery of chemo treatments targeting her particular type of cancer.

Dr. Sheldon Feldman, the Chief of Breast Surgery at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, suggested she try a complementary treatment—Reiki.

Dr. Feldman believes non-traditional approaches are a compliment to medicine. “I view Reiki as one of those modalities,” he said.

Feldman keeps a small photo of his older sister, Fern, in his office. She had a backache that turned out to be Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer. She died 24 years ago.

Raven Keyes has been Reiki master for 20 years.

Raven Keyes has been Reiki master for 20 years.

She changed her diet, took supplements, meditated and saw a therapist. “Just before the end, she had incredible vibrant health,” he said. “It was powerful; it was very instructive for me, as a learning surgeon, to see her go through this.”

Dr. Feldman recommended Raven Keyes, a Reiki master, to Susan. He said she could provide Reiki at the same time as Susan got chemo.

Keyes has practiced Reiki for about 20 years. She’s worked with NFL players and spent months at Ground Zero, treating recovery and rescue workers. Her first introduction to New-York Presbyterian was approximately a dozen years ago. Her client then requested her presence during heart surgery performed by Dr. Mehmet Oz.

Feldman recalled the work that Keyes and other Reiki healers did with Dr. Oz. “A lot of people die when they have a heart transplant,” he said. “They die because they reject the heart.”

Reiki masters prepare patients to say goodbye to the hearts that kept them alive for so many years—and welcome the new heart into their body.

“On a mind-body basis—on a chemical level—you’re more likely to accept it and not reject it,” Dr. Feldman said.

Feldman keeps a small photo of his older sister Fern, who died of Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer 24 years ago.

Feldman keeps a small photo of his older sister Fern, who died of Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer 24 years ago.

Susan went to each chemo session with a blanket, a pillow inscribed with a Hebrew prayer and Keyes. During weeks she wasn’t scheduled for chemo, Susan went to Keyes’ office for treatment.

It had a calming effect. Susan noticed that she didn’t have nausea or the extreme fatigue associated with chemo. She was even able to work part-time.

“Raven just became part of my chemo treatment—part of my cancer treatment,” said Susan. Her treatment included visits to her rabbi, who gave her prayers and talked about angels.

Susan was devastated by visits to the oncologist’s office. “I’d cry,” she said. Keyes also went with her to doctor’s appointments. “She made me laugh,” she said. “Raven would be there and help me to process what was happening to me.”

Keyes says Reiki is a universal life energy. She barely touches her clients. Instead, she is a conduit for energy that calms and relaxes patients, allowing them to heal themselves.

Four months later, doctors were stunned at Susan’s progress. The lesions in her lungs were disappearing. “The results of the chemotherapy were identified as being amazing,” she said. She became a candidate for surgery.

Keyes, who barely touches her clients, says Reiki is a universal life energy.

Keyes, who barely touches her clients, says Reiki is a universal life energy.

Susan wanted Keyes there and asked her to call in the angels during the operation. Just as Susan went under anesthesia, Keyes asked Dr. Feldman, “Do you want me to do that silently?”

Anything for the patient, he said.

As Susan lay unconscious, Dr. Feldman called everyone around the table. “I summoned the archangels and the angels of everybody in the operating room, and his sister Fern,” said Keyes.

“So we stood there in silence for a moment. And he said ‘Thank you, Raven’ and everybody went back to work,” she said.

During operations, Keyes sits at the head of the patient. As doctors, nurses and other surgical staff come and go during long, complex operations, she stays until the end, sometimes as long as 13 hours.

She’s the only person who stays with the patient for the entire surgery.

“The Reiki master takes care of the patient,” Keyes said. “Everybody else is too busy. They have to be paying attention 1,000 percent to what they have to do.”

Raven Keyes has been Reiki master for 20 years.

Raven Keyes has been Reiki master for 20 years.

“We sort of forget that Raven is really there,” said Dr. Feldman. “A typical thing a surgeon will say to the anesthesiologist is ‘How’s our patient doing?’ because we’re involved in doing this technical thing. And more often than not, I’ll say, ‘Raven, how’s our patient doing?’”

In Susan’s case, the patient is doing just fine. A year and a half after being diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer and given a two percent survival rate, her oncologist said she is cancer free. “I’m a member of a very tiny group,” she said.

“Some of my colleagues think I’ve lost it,” Dr. Feldman said. “They think I’m out to lunch with Reiki in the operating room, and healers.”

He maintains that in addition to surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and nutrition, Reiki is another tool for patients. “And you want to have as many tools in that tool box to help patients,” he said. “It’s not just about curing people of cancer and keeping them alive, but having less trauma in going through these difficult medical experiences is a big deal.”

Keyes said of her experience with Susan, “It’s like we’ve been to war together. And we got through it. You stand there and people are saying all of these really intense things that you don’t want to face. And somehow – we got through it.”

To hear from Dr. Feldman, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_184.

“Estuvimos juntos en la guerra”

Sanación Reiki en el hospital

Historia, fotos y video por Sherry Mazzocchi

"Algunos de mis colegas piensan que estoy loco", dijo el Dr. Sheldon Feldman, Jefe de Cirugía de Mama en el Hospital Presbiteriano de Nueva York/Centro Médico de la Universidad Columbia.

“Algunos de mis colegas piensan que estoy loco”, dijo el Dr. Sheldon Feldman, Jefe de Cirugía de Mama en el Hospital Presbiteriano de Nueva York/Centro Médico de la Universidad Columbia.

Cuando Susan fue diagnosticada con cáncer de mama en etapa 4, estaba devastada. No se había sentido particularmente enferma, pero tenía un cáncer agresivo que ya se había extendido a sus pulmones.

Eso significaba que no era candidata para cirugía. Incluso con la quimioterapia, el oncólogo dijo que sólo tenía una posibilidad de dos por ciento de sobrevivir.

Susan (quien no quiso utilizar su verdadero nombre para este artículo), se programó para una serie de tratamientos de quimioterapia dirigidos a su tipo particular de cáncer.

El Dr. Sheldon Feldman, Jefe de Cirugía de Mama en el Hospital Presbiteriano de Nueva York/Centro Médico de la Universidad Columbia, le sugirió que probara un complemento al tratamiento, Reiki.

El Dr. Feldman cree que los enfoques no tradicionales son un complemento a la medicina. “Veo el Reiki como una de esas modalidades”, dijo.

Feldman mantiene una pequeña foto de su hermana mayor, Fern, en su oficina. Fern tuvo un dolor de espalda que resultó ser un cáncer de mama metastático en etapa 4. Murió hace 24 años.

Raven Keyes ha practicado Reiki por cerca de 20 años.

Raven Keyes ha practicado Reiki por cerca de 20 años.

Ella cambió su dieta, tomó suplementos, meditó y vio a un terapeuta. “Justo antes del final, tenía una salud vibrante e increíble”, dijo. “Fue poderoso, muy instructivo para mí, como cirujano aprendiz, el verla pasar a través de eso”.

El Dr. Feldman recomendó a Raven Keyes, una maestra de Reiki, a Susan. Él dijo que podía dar Reiki, al mismo tiempo que Susan recibía quimioterapia.

Keyes ha practicado Reiki por cerca de 20 años. Ha trabajado con jugadores de la NFL y pasó meses en la Zona Cero, dando tratamiento a los trabajadores de recuperación y rescate. Su primer contacto con el Hospital Presbiteriano de Nueva York fue hace aproximadamente una docena de años. Su cliente solicitó su presencia durante la cirugía cardíaca realizada por el Dr. Mehmet Oz.

Feldman recordó la labor que Keyes y otros sanadores Reiki hicieron con el Dr. Oz. “Una gran cantidad de personas mueren cuando tienen un trasplante de corazón,” dijo. “Mueren porque rechazan el corazón”.

Los maestros de Reiki preparan a los pacientes para decir adiós a los corazones que los mantuvieron con vida durante tantos años, y a dar la bienvenida al nuevo corazón en su cuerpo.

“En una base mente-cuerpo, en un nivel químico, es más probable aceptarlo y no rechazarlo”, dijo el Dr. Feldman.

El Dr. Feldman mantiene una pequeña foto de su hermana mayor, Fern, en su oficina; ella tuvo un cáncer de mama metastático  en etapa 4 y murió hace 24 años.

El Dr. Feldman mantiene una pequeña foto de su hermana mayor, Fern, en su oficina; ella tuvo un cáncer de mama metastático en etapa 4 y murió hace 24 años.

Susan fue a cada sesión de quimioterapia con una manta, una almohada inscrita con una oración en hebreo y Keyes. Durante las semanas que no estaba prevista para quimioterapia, Susan fue a la oficina de Keyes para el tratamiento.

Tuvo un efecto calmante. Susan notó que no tenía náuseas ni la fatiga extrema asociada con la quimioterapia. Incluso era capaz de trabajar medio tiempo.

“Raven sólo se convirtió en parte de mi tratamiento de quimioterapia, parte de mi tratamiento para el cáncer”, dijo Susan. Su tratamiento incluía visitas a su rabino, quien le dio oraciones y le habló sobre los ángeles.

Susan se sentía devastada por las visitas al consultorio del oncólogo. “Yo lloraba”, dijo. Keyes también iba con ella a las citas con el médico. “Me hacía reír”, dijo. “Raven estaba ahí y me ayudaba a procesar lo que me estaba pasando”.

Keyes dice que el Reiki es una energía universal de la vida. Ella apenas toca sus clientes. En cambio, es un conducto para la energía que calma y relaja a los pacientes, lo que les permite curarse a sí mismos.

Cuatro meses más tarde, los médicos estaban asombrados del progreso de Susan. Las lesiones en sus pulmones estaban desapareciendo. “Los resultados de la quimioterapia fueron identificados como increíbles”, dijo. Ella se convirtió en un candidato para cirugía.

Keyes, que apenas toca sus clientes, dice que el Reiki es una energía universal de la vida.

Keyes, que apenas toca sus clientes, dice que el Reiki es una energía universal de la vida.

Susan quería a Keyes allí y le pidió que llamara a los ángeles durante la operación. En cuanto Susan fue puesta bajo anestesia, Keyes preguntó al Dr. Feldman, “¿Quiere que lo haga en silencio?”

Lo que sea por el paciente, dijo.

Mientras Susan yacía inconsciente, el Dr. Feldman llamó a todos alrededor de la mesa. “Llamó a los arcángeles y los ángeles de todo el mundo a la sala de operaciones, y a su hermana Fern”, dijo Keyes.

“Así que nos quedamos en silencio por un momento. Y él dijo: ‘Gracias, Raven’ y todo el mundo volvió a su trabajo”, dijo.

Durante las operaciones, Keyes se sienta a la cabeza del paciente. Mientras los médicos, enfermeras y demás personal de cirugía van y vienen durante las operaciones largas y complejas, ella permanece hasta el final, a veces hasta por 13 horas.

Ella es la única persona que se queda con el paciente durante toda la cirugía.

“El maestro de Reiki cuida del paciente”, dijo Keyes. “Todo el mundo está demasiado ocupado. Ellos tienen que estar poniendo un 1,000 por ciento de atención a lo que tienen que hacer”.

Raven Keyes ha practicado Reiki por cerca de 20 años.

Raven Keyes ha practicado Reiki por cerca de 20 años.

“Casi olvidamos que Raven está realmente ahí”, dijo el Dr. Feldman. “Una cosa típica que un cirujano le diría al anestesiólogo es ‘¿Cómo está nuestro paciente?’ Porque estamos involucrados en hacer esta cosa técnica. Y más a menudo que no, decía, ‘Raven, ¿cómo está nuestra paciente?'”.

En el caso de Susan, la paciente estaba muy bien. Un año y medio después de ser diagnosticada con cáncer de mama en etapa cuatro y recibir una tasa de supervivencia de dos por ciento, su oncólogo dijo que estaba libre de cáncer. “Soy un miembro de un grupo muy pequeño”, dijo.

“Algunos de mis colegas piensan que estoy loco”, dijo el Dr. Feldman. “Ellos piensan que salgo a almorzar con Reiki en el quirófano, y los sanadores”.

Sostiene que además de la cirugía, la radiación, la quimioterapia y la nutrición, el Reiki es una herramienta más para los pacientes. “Y usted quiere tener la mayor cantidad de herramientas para ayudarlos”, dijo. “No se trata sólo de curar a la gente de cáncer y mantenerlos con vida, sino que el pasar por estas experiencias médicas difíciles sea menos traumático”.

Keyes dijo de su experiencia con Susan, “es como si hubiéramos ido a la guerra juntos. Y lo logramos. Estás ahí y la gente está diciendo todas estas cosas realmente intensas que no deseas enfrentar. Y de alguna manera, las superamos”.

Para escuchar al Dr. Sheldon Feldman, favor visite http://bit.ly/MT_184.