Unidad Latina bridges gap
Unidad Latina acorta la brecha

  • English
  • Español

Unidad Latina bridges gap

Third annual conference fosters dialogue

Story by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer and Debralee Santos
Photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer and QPHOTONYC

“It’s important to engage,” said Hispanic Federation President José Calderón at the Unidad Latina Conference.<br /><i>Photo: R. Kilmer</i>

“It’s important to engage,” said Hispanic Federation President José Calderón at the Unidad Latina Conference.
Photo: R. Kilmer

Face time.

It was what everyone at the New York Hilton, including Roylan Fernández of Bronx Community College and Carolina Martínez of City College, wanted this past weekend.

Each was taking part in the Third Annual Unidad Latina Conference, organized by members of the New York State Senate, The Hispanic Federation, and The City University of New York (CUNY).

The conference, titled “Increasing Economic Opportunities for New York’s Growing Hispanic Community,” seeks to bring together policymakers, business and community leaders, and students from across the region to focus on policy issues.

The conference was hosted in part by additional sponsors such as Time Warner Cable, Walmart, Blue Shield, Molloy College, Rent-a-Center, Waste Management, Coca-Cola, AT&T, Cablevision, Con Edison, Baruch College, Catholic Charities, and others.

The featured speaker for Saturday’s luncheon was Sergio Fernández de Córdova, an internationally recognized entrepreneur and philanthropist, and it also included an awards presentation of Unidad Latina scholarships to 20 college-bound high school seniors of $2,000 each.

Majority Leader and Senator Dean Skelos was one of the organizers. </br><i>Photo: R. Kilmer </i>

Majority Leader and Senator Dean Skelos was one of the organizers.
Photo: R. Kilmer

While a principal goal of the two-day gathering, as in years past, was to highlight and address issues of concern for Hispanic New Yorkers, it also offered an opportunity for the largely Republican members of the New York State Senate to both speak to and hear from an ethnic group – the nation’s largest – which has traditionally identified itself largely as Democrats.

In fact, a new survey released just this past Fri., Sept. 27th by the non-profit research group Public Religion Research Institute, found that nationally, 56 percent of registered Hispanic voters identified with the Democrats, and only 19 percent identified with Republicans – the same number identified themselves as independents.

Moreover, the survey showed that Hispanics have grown increasingly negative toward the Republican Party. 48 percent of the Hispanics polled used associations such as “intolerant” and “out of touch” to describe the GOP.

Such sentiment made it more imperative that lines of communication remain open, said organizers, and to create opportunity for face time.

“It’s important to engage,” said Hispanic Federation President José Calderón. “We need to engage people on both sides of the aisle. It would be foolish not to.”

“It’s a great opportunity,” said CUNY student Carolina Martínez. </br><i>Photo: R. Kilmer</i>

“It’s a great opportunity,” said CUNY student Carolina Martínez.
Photo: R. Kilmer

And he noted that it was a pragmatic decision for advocacy organizations in New York such as the Hispanic Federation.

“We’re non-partisan,” he continued. “We welcome this opportunity for them to know our needs and aspirations and take that back to the legislature. Republicans control the Senate; we need to talk to them.” Calderon was also excited for local students, such as Fernández and Martínez, to speak directly with elected officials, especially those from districts far from their homes.

Fernández and Martínez did so at a roundtable discussion on public service as a pathway to positive impact in New York.

Moderating the discussion were State Senators John Flanagan of Long Island and Martin Golden of Brooklyn.

Martínez is a political science junior, and has been involved in the Federation’s Crear Futoros mentoring program. It pairs incoming freshmen with mentors that help them adapt to college and obtain the resources they need.

“It’s a great opportunity to meet elected officials and obtain a different perspective,” said Martínez of the conference.

She had already attended a workshop on economic growth and opportunity earlier in the day, and had learned about classes offered for people who have a limited knowledge of technology.

“It’s an opportunity to see the outstanding quality of Latino students, their ambition and elegance,” said CUNY Vice Chancellor Jay Hershenson. </br><i>Photo: R. Kilmer</i>

“It’s an opportunity to see the outstanding quality of Latino students, their ambition and elegance,” said CUNY Vice Chancellor Jay Hershenson.
Photo: R. Kilmer

The importance of being aware of digital developments was not lost on her.

“If you’re not tech-savvy, you’ll miss out.”

Fernández is just a semester away from getting his Associate’s Degree in engineering, and he’s also been involved in public policy.

This past April, he attended the Somos El Futuro Model State Senate sessions in Albany. A tradition of over a decade, the sessions allow CUNY students to assume the role and responsibility of State Senators and to hold a full mock session, with a vote included, in the Senate Chamber.

Fernández represented State Senator John Flanagan’s district.

“I’m hoping to use that as an icebreaker,” during the discussion, admitted Fernández.

He said he would ask about the tuition costs of city and state public universities.

“I’m interested to see how they respond to our questions.”

So was CUNY Senior Vice Chancellor Jay Hershenson, who served as a panelist during the roundtable discussion. He was also recognized at the conference with the Unidad Latina Legacy Award for his contributions to academic excellence.

“The students are very interested in public service,” noted Hershenson. “What a wonderful opportunity to get to know public officials who are involved in education.”

Robert Mujica, Chief of Staff to Sen. Skelos. </br><i>Photo: QPHOTONYC </i>

Robert Mujica, Chief of Staff to Sen. Skelos.
Photo: QPHOTONYC

“If you have an interest in issues that affect people, you have to talk with those people who have the ability to do something about it,” he continued. “And it’s an opportunity for the legislature to see the outstanding quality of Latino students, their ambition and elegance.”

Hershenson mulled over what questions he would ask the legislature if he could do so as a student involved in the roundtable.

He thought of three.

“How do they prioritize their time, because there are so many issues that require attention,” he said. “I’d also want to know about the future of the Dream Act and the future of immigration reform.”

Senator Dean Skelos, the Majority Leader of the Senate and organizer of the conference, was actively involved throughout the conference.

“I am excited for this year’s Unidad Latina conference,” said Sen. Skelos, “and the opportunity it presents to celebrate the achievements of the Hispanic community and develop new ways to create bright futures for individuals, families and businesses.”

And it seems that plans for a fourth conference – and more – are well underway.

“The Latino community is so diverse and growing in such dynamic ways,” added Calderon. “Latinos are everywhere in the state and it’s important for our community to be heard.”

For more information on the work of The Hispanic Federation, please visit www.hispanicfederation.org.

For more on the Unidad Latina Conference, please visit www.senateunidad.com.

Unidad Latina acorta la brecha

Tercera conferencia anual fomenta el diálogo

Historia por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer y Debralee Santos
Fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer y QPHOTONYC

“It’s important to engage,” said Hispanic Federation President José Calderón at the Unidad Latina Conference.<br /><i>Photo: R. Kilmer</i>

“Es importante participar”, dijo el presidente de la Federación Hispana José Calderón en la Conferencia de Unidad Latina.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Cara a cara.

Era lo que todo el mundo en el Hilton New York, incluyendo Roylan Fernández del Bronx Community College y Carolina Martínez del City College, querían este fin de semana pasado.

Cada uno estaba tomando parte en la Tercera Conferencia Anual de Unidad Latina, organizada por miembros del Senado del Estado de Nueva York, The Hispanic Federation y The City University de Nueva York (CUNY).

La conferencia titulada “Aumentando las oportunidades económicas para la creciente comunidad hispana de Nueva York”, busca reunir a legisladores, líderes empresariales y comunitarios y estudiantes de toda la región para concentrarse en cuestiones políticas.

La conferencia fue organizada en parte por patrocinadores adicionales, tales como: Time Warner Cable, Walmart, Blue Shield, Molloy College, Rent-A-Center, Waste Management, Coca-Cola, AT & T, Cablevision, Con Edison, Baruch College, Caridades Católicas, y otros.

El orador invitado para el almuerzo del sábado fue Sergio Fernández de Córdova, un empresario y filántropo reconocido a nivel internacional y también incluyó una presentación de los premios de Unidad Latina, 20 becas para seniors preuniversitarios en escuela secundaria de 2,000 dólares cada una.

El líder de la mayoría, y senador, Dean Skelos, fue uno de los organizadores. </br><i>Foto: R. Kilmer</i>

El líder de la mayoría, y senador, Dean Skelos, fue uno de los organizadores.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Si bien el objetivo principal de la reunión de dos días, como en años anteriores, fue destacar y abordar cuestiones de interés para los neoyorquinos hispanos, también ofreció una oportunidad para que los miembros republicanos en el Senado del estado de Nueva York, hablaran y escucharan a un grupo étnico –el más grande de la nación- que se ha identificado tradicionalmente como de mayoría demócrata.

De hecho, un nuevo estudio lanzado justo el pasado viernes 27 de septiembre por el grupo de investigación sin fines de lucro, Public Religion Research Institute, encontró que a nivel nacional, el 56 por ciento de los votantes hispanos registrados se identifican con los demócratas, y sólo 19 por ciento se identificó con los republicanos, los mismos que se identificaron como independientes.

Por otra parte, la encuesta mostró que los hispanos han crecido cada vez más en forma negativa hacia el partido republicano. El 48 por ciento de los hispanos encuestados realizaron asociaciones como “intolerante” y “fuera de contacto” para describir al GOP.

Este sentimiento hace más importante que las líneas de comunicación permanezcan abiertas, dijeron los organizadores, y crear oportunidades para encuentros cara a cara.

“Es importante participar”, dijo el presidente de la Federación Hispana José Calderón. “Tenemos que involucrar a la gente en ambos partidos. Sería absurdo no hacerlo”.

“Es una gran oportunidad”, dijo la estudiante de CUNY, Carolina Martínez. </br><i>Foto: R. Kilmer</i>

“Es una gran oportunidad”, dijo la estudiante de CUNY, Carolina Martínez.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Y señaló que se trataba de una decisión pragmática de organizaciones de apoyo de Nueva York, como la Federación Hispana.

“Somos no partidistas”, continuó. “Damos la bienvenida a esta oportunidad para que conozcan nuestras necesidades y aspiraciones y los lleven de vuelta a la legislatura. Los republicanos controlan el Senado, tenemos que hablar con ellos”.

Calderón también estaba emocionado por los estudiantes locales, como Fernández y Martínez, de hablar directamente con los funcionarios electos, especialmente los de los distritos alejados de sus hogares.

Fernández y Martínez lo hicieron en una mesa redonda sobre el servicio público como un camino hacia el impacto positivo en Nueva York.

Moderando la discusión estuvieron los senadores estatales John Flanagan, de Long Island, y Martin Goldin de Brooklyn.

Martínez es un estudiante de ciencia política, y ha participado en el programa federal de tutoría Crear Futuros, que empareja estudiantes de primer año con mentores que les ayudan a adaptarse a la universidad y a obtener los recursos que necesitan.

“Es una gran oportunidad para conocer a los funcionarios electos y obtener una perspectiva diferente”, dijo Martínez de la conferencia.

Ya había asistido a un seminario sobre el crecimiento económico y las oportunidades al principio del día, y aprendió acerca de las clases que se ofrecen a las personas que tienen un conocimiento limitado de la tecnología.

"Es una oportunidad de ver la excelente calidad de los estudiantes latinos, su ambición y elegancia", dijo el Vice Rector CUNY Jay Hershenson. </br><i>Foto: R. Kilmer</i>

“Es una oportunidad de ver la excelente calidad de los estudiantes latinos, su ambición y elegancia”, dijo el Vice Rector CUNY Jay Hershenson.
Foto: R. Kilmer

La importancia de ser conscientes de los desarrollos digitales no se perdió en ella.

“Si usted no es experto en tecnología, se perderá”.

Fernández está a sólo un semestre de conseguir su título de asociado en ingeniería, y también ha estado involucrado en la política pública.

En abril asistió a las sesiones del modelo senatorial Somos El Futuro, en Albany. Una tradición de más de una década, las sesiones permiten a los estudiantes de CUNY asumir el papel y la responsabilidad de los senadores estatales y mantener una sesión completa de simulacro con una votación incluida en la Cámara del Senado.

Fernández representó al distrito del senador estatal John Flanagan.

“Tengo la esperanza de utilizarlo como rompehielos”, reconoció Fernández durante el debate.

Dijo que iba a preguntarle acerca de los costos de matrícula de las universidades públicas de la ciudad y el estado.

“Estoy interesado en ver cómo responden a nuestras preguntas”.

Igualmente lo estaba el Vice Rector de CUNY, Jay Hershenson, quien se desempeñó como panelista durante la mesa redonda. También fue reconocido en la conferencia con el Premio Legacy de Unidad Latina por sus contribuciones a la excelencia académica.

“Los estudiantes están muy interesados en el servicio público”, señaló Hershenson. “¡Qué maravillosa oportunidad de conocer a los funcionarios públicos que participan en la educación!”.

Robert Mujica, jefe de personal del senador Skelos. </br><i>Foto: QPHOTONYC </i>

Robert Mujica, jefe de personal del senador Skelos.
Foto: QPHOTONYC

“Si usted tiene un interés en temas que afecten a las personas, tiene que hablar con aquellas personas que tienen la capacidad de hacer algo al respecto”, continuó. “Y es una oportunidad para que la legislatura vea la excelente calidad de los estudiantes latinos, su ambición y elegancia”.

Hershenson reflexionó sobre qué preguntas le haría a la legislatura si pudiera pasar como estudiante participante en la mesa redonda.

Pensó en tres.

“¿Cómo priorizan su tiempo?, porque hay muchos temas que requieren atención”, dijo. “También me gustaría saber sobre el futuro de la Dream Act y el futuro de la reforma migratoria”.

El senador Dean Skelos, el líder de la mayoría del Senado y organizador de la conferencia, participó activamente durante toda la conferencia.

“Estoy muy emocionado por la conferencia de Unidad Latina de este año”, dijo el senador Skelos, “y de la oportunidad que se presenta para celebrar los logros de la comunidad hispana y desarrollar nuevas maneras de crear un futuro brillante para los individuos, las familias y las empresas”.

Y parece que los planes para una cuarta conferencia -y más- están en marcha.

“La comunidad latina es tan diversa y crece de una manera tan dinámica”, agregó Calderón. “Los latinos están en todas partes del estado y es importante que sea escuchada nuestra comunidad”.

Para más información sobre la labor de The Hispanic Federation, por favor visite www.hispanicfederation.org.

Para más información sobre la conferencia de Unidad Latina, por favor visite www.senateunidad.com.