Man in the Mural
El hombre del mural

  • English
  • Español

Man in the Mural

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“The murals are welcomed when they capture the spirit of the place,” said photographer Camilo José Vergara (left), here with artist Lance Bradley.

“The murals are welcomed when they capture the spirit of the place,” said photographer Camilo José Vergara (left), here with artist Lance Bradley.

Camilo José Vergara has a thing for the King.

The photographer doubles as a curator during his immersive tours of the streets of America in which he documents the many likenesses of Martin Luther King Jr., found in murals throughout the country.

Vergara is a Chilean immigrant who was awarded the National Medal of Arts and Humanities by President Barack Obama in June.

On Wed., Aug. 21, his photographic exhibition of the Martin Luther King, Jr. murals was on display at 1900 Lexington Avenue, which is managed by Manhattan North Management and Tahl Topp Properties. The event was also hosted the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce, and came just days before the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, D.C. in which King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.

That the exhibit was up for only a day paralleled the short-lived existence of most murals.

The lifespan of a mural is dependent on many variables, from ownership of the building, to the sturdiness of the edifice, the ravages of weather and time, and the aesthetic and cultural preferences of the day.

“The murals are welcomed when they capture the spirit of the place,” said Vergara.

When using the cityscape as their canvas, muralists have much more freedom than if they are collaborating with entrenched institutions, political or otherwise, he argued.

“It allows for spontaneity for come through. They are not repeating the same model over and over and over. They have the freedom not to do King as he was, but as they see him,” he explained.

“He was a man of the people, for all the people,” said Lloyd Williams, President and CEO of the Harlem Chamber of Commerce.

“He was a man of the people, for all the people,” said Lloyd Williams, President and CEO of the Harlem Chamber of Commerce.

Throughout his travels, Vergara has observed that images of Martin Luther King reflect the communities which have proudly displayed his likeness.

Most often King is surrounded by other historic Black figures, like Malcom X and Nelson Mandela. Sometimes he and President Obama stand side by side.

But his features become more malleable as they enter different communities, said Vergara, who swore that King looks almost Asian in a mural in a predominantly Asian community in Chicago. In another, he looks Toltec and is surrounded by La Virgen de Guadalupe and Emiliano Zapato; in yet another, he plays the guitar.

“Who ever heard of Martin Luther King playing the guitar?” mused Vergara.

This appropriation of the civil rights leader is what Vergara loves about the murals, and is, for him, an indication of the leader’s universal appeal as evidence by the countless individuals throughout the country – and the world – who have adopted his physical resemblance and embraced his message.

“He’s every man.”

As such, there is not an ideal time or place to honor him, noted attendee Lloyd Williams, President and CEO of the Harlem Chamber of Commerce.

“There is no location or economic strata that is not appropriate for Martin Luther King. He was a man of the people, for all the people.”

The exhibit was also part of Harlem Week. This year, the festival celebrates the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and the half-century that has passed since the March on Washington and the “I Have a Dream” speech.

One facet of the commemoration was to honor the historic events; another was to keep history ingrained in the collective memory. And King, in the likenesses displayed at the vacant storefront, continues to capture the public’s attention 50 years later.

Artist Lance Bradley poses with the photograph of his Martin Luther King, Jr. mural.

Artist Lance Bradley poses with the photograph of his Martin Luther King, Jr. mural.

“I’m watching people walk by and do double takes,” said Williams.

Joseph Tahl, the President and co-founder of Tahl Propp Equities, which owns 1900 Lexington, was also on hand for the exhibit.

“With the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, it makes you think of all Martin Luther King has accomplished,” said Tahl.

He felt people should look to King more often as a good example of selflessness; in his own collaborations with the community, Tahl said it was a model that he has sought to incorporate.

He noted that 1900 is searching for a retailer to occupy the first floor where the exhibit is being held.

“We are going to stress renting to local businesses,” he said.

The rest of the building also has 134 units of affordable housing.

The building’s façade is glass, however, making a mural difficult to render.

For muralists like Lance Bradley, whose own rendition of Martin Luther King was photographed by Vergara, it might be an inspiration.

Bradley’s Harlem mural, based on a photograph of Dr. King, is directly across the street from another mural he painted of Barack Obama after he took office.

“The energy from the election of Barack Obama became an Orpheus,” said Bradley. “I returned to paint Martin Luther King, and it made both murals complete.” To learn more about Camilo José Vergara, visit www.camilojosevergara.com.

To learn more about the Tahl Properties/1900 Lexington Avenue, please visit www.manhattannorth.com.

 “For more than four decades I have devoted myself to photographing and documenting the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. I feel that a people’s past, including their accomplishments, aspirations and failures, are reflected less in the faces of those who live in these neighborhoods than in the material, built environment in which they move and modify over time. Photography for me is a tool for continuously asking questions, for understanding the spirit of a place, and, as I have discovered over time, for loving and appreciating cities.” Camilo José Vergara

El hombre del mural

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

"Los murales son bienvenidos cuando capturan el espíritu del lugar", dijo el fotógrafo Camilo José Vergara, a la izquierda, con el artista Lance Bradley.

“Los murales son bienvenidos cuando capturan el espíritu del lugar”, dijo el fotógrafo Camilo José Vergara, a la izquierda, con el artista Lance Bradley.

Camilo José Vergara tiene una afinidad por Martin Luther King Jr.

El fotógrafo funciona como curador durante sus recorridos de inmersión en las calles de la América urbana en los que documenta los numerosos retratos de Martin Luther King Jr., que se encuentra en murales a través del país.

Vergara es un inmigrante chileno que fue galardonado con la Medalla Nacional de las Artes y Humanidades por el presidente Barack Obama en junio.

El miércoles 21 de agosto, su exposición fotográfica de los murales fue exhibida en el 1900 de la avenida Lexington, que es administrado por Manhattan North Management y Tahl Topp Properties. El evento también fue auspiciado por Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce, y tuvo lugar unos días antes del 50 aniversario de la marcha en Washington, DC en la que King pronunció su discurso “I have a dream”.

Que la exposición estuviera sólo un día fue paralelo a la existencia de corta duración de la mayoría de los murales.

La vida útil de un mural depende de muchas variables, la propiedad del inmueble, la solidez del edificio, como los estragos del clima y el tiempo, y las preferencias estéticas y culturales de la época.

“Ellos (los murales) son bienvenidos cuando capturan el espíritu del lugar”, dijo Vergara.

Cuando utilizan el paisaje urbano como su lienzo, los muralistas tienen mucha más libertad que si están colaborando con instituciones arraigadas o políticas, argumentó.

“Permite que salga la espontaneidad. No están repitiendo el mismo modelo una y otra y otra vez. Tienen la libertad de no hacer a Martin Luther King como era, sino como lo ven “, explicó.

"Él era un hombre de la gente y para todo el pueblo", dijo Lloyd Williams, Presidente y CEO de la Cámara de Comercio de Harlem.

“Él era un hombre de la gente y para todo el pueblo”, dijo Lloyd Williams, Presidente y CEO de la Cámara de Comercio de Harlem.

A lo largo de sus viajes, Vergara ha observado que las imágenes de Martin Luther King reflejan las comunidades que muestran con orgullo su similitud.

Muy a menudo King está rodeado de otras figuras negras históricas, como Malcom X y Nelson Mandela. A veces, él y el presidente Obama están lado a lado, pero sus funciones son más maleables al entrar en las diferentes comunidades, dijo Vergara, quien juró que King se ve casi asiático en un mural en una comunidad predominantemente asiática en Chicago. En otro, se ve tolteca y está rodeado por la Virgen de Guadalupe y Emiliano Zapata, y en otra, toca la guitarra.

“¿Quién ha oído hablar de Martin Luther King tocando la guitarra?”, reflexionó.

Esta apropiación de King es lo que Vergara ama de los murales, y es, para él, una indicación de un atractivo universal del líder ya que la gente de todo el mundo ha adoptado su parecido físico y ha abrazado su mensaje.

“Él es cada hombre”.

Por lo tanto no hay un momento o lugar ideal para honrarlo, señaló el asistente Lloyd Williams, Presidente y CEO de la Cámara de Comercio de Harlem.

“No hay lugar o estrato económico que no sea apropiado para Martin Luther King. Él era un hombre de la gente y para todo el pueblo”.

La exposición también fue parte de la Semana de Harlem. Este año el festival celebra el 150 aniversario de la Proclamación de Emancipación, y el 50 aniversario de la marcha en Washington, que fue el pasado sábado, además del famoso discurso “I have a dream” de Martin Luther King.

Mientras que una de las facetas de la conmemoración fue en honor a los acontecimientos históricos, otra era mantener la historia arraigada en la memoria colectiva de la gente. Y King, en las semejanzas que aparecen en escaparates vacíos, sigue captando la atención del público 50 años después.

El artista Lance Bradley frente a la fotografía de su mural de Martin Luther King, Jr.

El artista Lance Bradley frente a la fotografía de su mural de Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Estoy viendo a la gente caminar y hacer doble turno”, dijo Williams.

Joseph Tahl, presidente y cofundador de Tahl Propp Equities, quien es dueño del 1900 de Lexington, también estuvo presente en la exposición.

“El 50 aniversario de la marcha en Washington te hace pensar en todo lo que Martin Luther King ha logrado”, dijo Tahl.

Agregó que este día las personas deben mirar a King más a menudo como un buen ejemplo de altruismo, en su propia colaboración con la comunidad, y Tahl dijo que es un modelo que él ha tratado de incorporar.

Señaló que el 1900 está en búsqueda de un minorista que ocupe la primera planta, donde se celebró la exposición.

“Vamos a insistir en rentarlo a negocios locales”, dijo.

El resto del edificio tiene 134 unidades de vivienda asequible.

Cabe señalar que la fachada del edificio es de cristal, por lo que probablemente no será un lugar ideal para los muralistas como Lance Bradley, cuya propia versión de Martin Luther King fue fotografiada por Vergara.

Para aprender más sobre Camilo José Vergara, visite www.camilojosevergara.com.

Para conocer más sobre Tahl Properties/1900 Lexington Avenue, favor visite www.manhattannorth.com.

“Durante más de cuatro décadas, me he dedicado a fotografiar y documentar las comunidades más pobres y segregados en América urbana. Siento que el pasado de un pueblo, incluyendo sus logros, aspiraciones y fracasos, se refleja menos en los rostros de las personas que viven en estos barrios que en el material, el medio ambiente construido en el que se mueven y modifican con el tiempo. La fotografía para mí es una herramienta para continuamente hacer preguntas, para entender el espíritu de un lugar, y, como he descubierto con el tiempo, para amar y apreciar las ciudades “. Camilo José Vergara