“I love you, Mom”
“Te amo, mamá”

  • English
  • Español

“I love you, Mom”

Corey Johnson elected new City Council Speaker

Photos: NYC Council | William Alatriste

“I wouldn’t be here without you,” said Johnson about his mother Ann.

“I wouldn’t be here without you,” said Johnson
about his mother Ann.

The City Council has its new Speaker.

Councilmember Corey Johnson, whose district includes Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, the West Village and Times Square, was chosen by a 48-1 vote during the Council’s charter meeting on January 3.

He replaces Melissa Mark-Viverito, who vacated her Council seat due to term limits.

Some had hoped that Mark-Viverito’s historic tenure as the first Latina Speaker would be followed by another groundbreaking election in the form of a black Speaker.

The all-male candidate slate for Speaker had included City Councilmembers Jumaane Williams; Donovan Richards; Robert Cornegy; Ritchie Torres; Ydanis Rodríguez; Mark Levine; Jimmy Van Bramer; and Johnson.

While Johnson had been pegged as a frontrunner for several weeks, his selection was not without some controversy, as some members and civil rights leaders voiced resistance to a white male winning the Speaker role.

Councilmember Inez Barron, who is black, was the lone “no” vote during the Council session. In her remarks before the Council, Barron decried the lack of black individuals in top positions of city government, and nominated herself for Speaker.

Two Councilmembers — Williams, who had also criticized the lack of racial diversity in top city roles, and Debi Rose — were not present for the vote.

Johnson heads into City Hall on his first full day at work as Speaker.

Johnson heads into City Hall on his first full day
at work as Speaker.

Johnson, who is openly gay and HIV-positive, pledged to be an ally to members of color and said his leadership style would allow him to defer to others “who have the life experience to talk on these issues in a way that I cannot and should not.”

“That doesn’t mean I can’t lead the body in a unified way that respects the members,” he added.

Johnson also referenced some of the legislative challenges that the City Council had surmounted in decades past, including anti-LGBTQ discrimination.

“Let us continue to take on the important issues that may be considered controversial today, but will be indisputable tomorrow,” he urged fellow Councilmembers. “Let us continue to use the power of this body to expand opportunity for all, to be the voice for the voiceless, the champions of the most vulnerable. Let us continue to be a source of light and love and hope in a turbulent world.”

Johnson, 35, is a Massachusetts native who came to New York City at age 19. He recalled arriving in the New York with little money, few belongings and no place to live – and he spoke with palpable affection for one person in particular.

“My Mom, Ann, drove down from Massachusetts to be here,” said an emotional Johnson. “My family never had it easy, and Mom worked incredibly hard to provide for my sister and me. She taught me the meaning of overcoming adversity and unconditional love. She taught me the importance of service to others. And she taught me that fierce women get things done. You are my best friend, my rock, and I wouldn’t be here without you. I love you, Mom.”

Councilmember (and one-time Speaker candidate) Ydanis Rodríguez with his daughter and Johnson. Photo: Twitter/@ydanis

Councilmember (and one-time
Speaker candidate) Ydanis
Rodríguez with his daughter and
Johnson. Photo: Twitter/@ydanis

“I want New York to be a place where you can still be 19 years old and come here and still survive,” Johnson said. “And it’s becoming more and more difficult if you don’t come from a wealthy family to be able to do that.”

Johnson said he is set to focus on numerous issues, including the subway system, real estate development and affordable housing.

While Johnson’s ideological views appear similar to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s, the new Speaker has indicated he would be willing to buck the mayor on certain issues. Johnson has said that he would consider having the city put up “significant” money to fix the subway system, something de Blasio has resisted.

He has also voiced opposition to de Blasio’s plan to combat homelessness, including the construction of new homeless shelters.

“I don’t think it’s probably feasible that we’re going to be able to site ninety shelters in communities throughout the city,” he said in an interview. “I mean, the mayor’s plan was a ten-year plan. The mayor’s only going to be there for another four years.”

“Today’s election of Councilmember Corey Johnson as Speaker has left me not only proud to be a member of this body, but inspired to continue to work hard for my constituents and all New Yorkers across our city,” said Councilmember Rafael Salamanca in a statement. “As we heard in our Charter meeting, Speaker Johnson overcame real disparity to get to where he is today. I believe he’s a motivating force for others who may be disenfranchised to consider public service, and that’s the kind of person we need leading this Council.”

Also issuing congratulations was President George Gresham of 1199SEIU, which represents 250,000 healthcare workers and caregivers in New York.

“Speaker Johnson has taken a vocal stance on issues directly affecting our members, including affordable housing, income inequality, and the budget and health care assaults on our city from Washington,” said Gresham. “True partnership is needed to ensure that working people have the tools they need to live with dignity in our great city. We look forward to continuing to stand together to create an even better city for our members, and for all working New Yorkers.”

Johnson (center) at the National Action Network with fellow Speaker Candidates Jumaane Williams (to his left) and Robert Cornegy (to his right).

Johnson (center) at the National Action
Network with fellow Speaker Candidates
Jumaane Williams (to his left) and Robert
Cornegy (to his right).

This past Sat., Jan. 6th, Johnson visited the weekly Saturday morning rally held at the National Action Network’s House of Justice and the Reverend Al Sharpton in Harlem.

The rally was attended by two black Council Speaker candidates – Williams and Robert Cornegy, of Brooklyn.

Johnson addressed the disappointment of not seeing history made with the election of the first African-American speaker, and reiterated his commitment to using his experiences to work collaboratively with all communities.

“Being an openly gay man, being the only openly HIV-positive elected official in the state of New York, being someone who grew up in public housing, not coming from a wealthy family — those are things that are not the same as being of color in any way whatsoever,” Johnson said. “But I hope it’s given me the sensitivity and the compassion to stand with and want to work with communities that have been oppressed and marginalized historically and systematically.”

“Te amo, mamá”

Corey Johnson elegido como presidente del Concejo Municipal

Fotos: Concejo NYC | William Alatriste

Johnson abraza a la concejala Inez Barron, quien emitió el único voto por el 'no'.

Johnson abraza a la concejala Inez Barron,
quien emitió el único voto por el ‘no’.

El Concejo Municipal tiene a su nuevo presidente.

El concejal Corey Johnson, cuyo distrito incluye a Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, West Village y Times Square, fue elegido por un voto de 48-1 durante la reunión constitutiva del Concejo el 3 de enero.

Él reemplaza a Melissa Mark-Viverito, quien dejó libre su asiento en el Concejo debido a límites de mandato.

Algunos esperaban que el mandato histórico de Mark-Viverito como primera presidenta hispana fuera seguido por otra elección pionera en la forma de un presidente negro.

La lista de candidatos masculinos para orador incluyó a los concejales Jumaane Williams; Donovan Richards; Robert Cornegy; Ritchie Torres; Ydanis Rodríguez; Mark Levine; Jimmy Van Bramer; y Johnson.

Si bien Johnson había sido considerado como un candidato favorito durante varias semanas, su selección no estuvo exenta de controversia, ya que algunos miembros y líderes de los derechos civiles expresaron su resistencia a que un hombre blanco ganara el papel de presidente.

La concejala Inez Barron, quién es negra, fue la única que votó “no” durante la sesión del Concejo. En sus comentarios ante el Concejo, Barron denunció la falta de individuos negros en los puestos más altos del gobierno de la ciudad y se nominó a sí misma para ser presidenta.

Corey Johnson ha sido elegido nuevo presidente del Ayuntamiento.

Corey Johnson ha sido elegido nuevo presidente
del Ayuntamiento.

Dos concejales (Williams, quien también criticó la falta de diversidad racial en los principales cargos de la ciudad) y Debi Rose, no estuvieron presentes para la votación.

Johnson, quien es abiertamente homosexual y seropositivo, se comprometió a ser un aliado de los miembros de color y dijo que su estilo de liderazgo le permitiría diferir de otros “que tienen la experiencia de vida para hablar sobre estos temas de una manera que yo no puedo y no debería”.

“Eso no significa que no pueda dirigir el cuerpo de una manera unificada que respete a los miembros”, agregó.

Johnson también hizo referencia a algunos de los desafíos legislativos que el Concejo Municipal superó en décadas pasadas, incluida la discriminación contra los LGBTQ.

“Continuemos asumiendo los asuntos importantes que pueden ser considerados controversiales hoy, pero serán indiscutibles mañana”, instó a sus colegas concejales. “Continuemos usando el poder de este cuerpo para expandir las oportunidades para todos, para ser la voz de los sin voz, los campeones de los más vulnerables. Continuemos siendo una fuente de luz, amor y esperanza en un mundo turbulento”.

Johnson realiza su primera conferencia de prensa como presidente.

Johnson realiza su primera conferencia de
prensa como presidente.

Johnson, de 35 años, nació en Massachusetts y llegó a Nueva York a la edad de 19 años. Recordó haber llegado a Nueva York con poco dinero, pocas pertenencias y sin lugar para vivir, y habló con un afecto palpable por una persona en particular.

“Mi mamá, Ann, condujo desde Massachusetts para estar aquí”, dijo un emocionado Johnson. “Mi familia nunca lo tuvo fácil, y mamá trabajó increíblemente duro para mantenernos a mi hermana y a mí. Ella me enseñó el significado de superar la adversidad y el amor incondicional. Ella me enseñó la importancia del servicio a los demás. Y ella me enseñó que las mujeres feroces hacen las cosas. Eres mi mejor amigo, mi roca, y no estaría aquí sin ti. Te amo mamá”.

“Quiero que Nueva York sea un lugar donde todavía puedas tener 19 años y venir y sobrevivir”, dijo Johnson. “Y cada vez es más difícil poder hacer eso si no vienes de una familia adinerada”.

Johnson dijo que se concentrará en numerosos temas, incluido el sistema de metro, el desarrollo inmobiliario y la vivienda asequible.

Si bien las opiniones ideológicas de Johnson parecen similares a las del alcalde Bill de Blasio, el nuevo presidente ha indicado que estaría dispuesto a desafiar al alcalde en ciertos asuntos. Johnson ha dicho que consideraría que la ciudad coloque dinero “significativo” para arreglar el sistema del metro, algo a lo que De Blasio se ha resistido.

Johnson se dirige al Ayuntamiento en su primer día completo trabajando como presidente.

Johnson se dirige al Ayuntamiento en su primer
día completo trabajando como presidente.

También ha expresado su oposición al plan del alcalde para combatir la falta de vivienda, incluida la construcción de nuevos refugios para personas sin hogar.

“No creo que sea factible que podamos ubicar noventa refugios en comunidades en toda la ciudad”, dijo en una entrevista. “Quiero decir, el plan del alcalde era uno de diez años. El alcalde solo estará por otros cuatro”.

“La elección de hoy del concejal Corey Johnson como presidente me ha dejado no solo orgulloso de ser miembro de este organismo, sino inspirado para seguir trabajando arduamente para mis electores y todos los neoyorquinos en toda nuestra ciudad”, dijo el concejal Rafael Salamanca en un comunicado. “Como escuchamos en nuestra reunión constitutiva, el presidente Johnson superó la disparidad real para llegar a donde está hoy. Creo que es una fuerza motivadora para otros que pueden estar privados de sus derechos consideren el servicio público, y ese es el tipo de persona que necesitamos liderando este Concejo”.

También emitió felicitaciones el presidente de 1199SEIU, George Gresham, quien representa a 250,000 trabajadores de la salud y cuidadores en Nueva York.

“El presidente Johnson ha adoptado una postura vocal sobre los problemas que afectan directamente a nuestros miembros, incluida la vivienda asequible, la desigualdad de ingresos y los ataques al presupuesto y la salud a nuestra ciudad desde Washington”, dijo Gresham. “Se necesita una verdadera asociación para garantizar que los trabajadores tengan las herramientas que necesitan para vivir con dignidad en nuestra gran ciudad. Esperamos

El concejal (y ex candidato a presidente) Ydanis Rodríguez con su hija y Johnson. Foto: Twitter/@ydanis

El concejal (y ex candidato a
presidente) Ydanis Rodríguez con
su hija y Johnson. Foto:
Twitter/@ydanis

continuar unidos para crear una ciudad aún mejor para nuestros miembros y para todos los neoyorquinos trabajadores”.

El pasado sábado 6 de enero, Johnson visitó el mitin semanal de los sábados en la Casa de Justicia de la Red de Acción Nacional y al reverendo Al Sharpton en Harlem.

A la manifestación asistieron dos candidatos negros a la Cámara de Representantes: Williams y Robert Cornegy, de Brooklyn.

Johnson abordó la decepción de no ver que se hiciera historia con la elección del primer orador afroamericano, y reiteró su compromiso de utilizar sus experiencias para trabajar en colaboración con todas las comunidades.

“Ser un hombre abiertamente homosexual, ser el único funcionario electo abiertamente VIH positivo en el estado de Nueva York, ser alguien que creció en viviendas públicas, no proveniente de una familia adinerada, son cosas que no son lo mismo que ser de color, de ninguna manera”, dijo Johnson. “Pero espero que me hayan dado la sensibilidad y la compasión para apoyar y querer trabajar con comunidades que han sido oprimidas y marginadas histórica y sistemáticamente”.