Frontline fight
Lucha en primera línea

  • English
  • Español

Frontline fight

Story and photos by Mónica Barnkow

“Our libraries are the lifelines,” said La Fuente’s Luis Feliz.

“Our libraries are the lifelines,” said La Fuente’s Luis Feliz.

A cut to the heart.

That’s what advocates who rallied this past Fri., May 15th say that funding cuts to the city’s three public library systems constitute for the millions of residents who rely on its services.

The city’s three systems are the Brooklyn Public Library, the Queens Library and the New York Public Library (NYPL), which serves Manhattan, The Bronx and Staten Island.

Representatives of all three systems, elected officials and allies gathered at City Hall to demand that the City Council and Mayor de Blasio restore the $65 million cut in funding.

“The libraries are the hearts of our communities,” said District Council 37’s Executive Director Henry Garrido. “But budget cuts since the recession have reduced services and hours, and desperately needed infrastructure work was set aside.”

District Council 37 is the city’s largest municipal employees union, with 121,000 municipal workers, including those at city libraries.

“The libraries are the hearts of our communities,” said District Council 37’s Executive Director Henry Garrido (center).

“The libraries are the hearts of our communities,” said District Council 37’s Executive Director Henry Garrido (center).

In the aftermath of the 2008 recession, the Bloomberg administration cut funding for the library systems. Since 2009, the city has reduced funding by nearly a fifth.

Despite subsequent growth in city revenues, and soaring attendance rates, funds have not been restored to pre-recession levels.

Moreover, in the 2016 budget submitted by Mayor Bill de Blasio, the three systems lost approximately $10 million in their operating budgets.

In 2015, the three systems received $323 million, which included $5 million from the City Council in operating funds; this year, only $313 million was allocated.

In addition, supporters have called for $1.4 billion in capital funding for infrastructural upgrades and maintenance, and to facilitate the expansion of services at all branches to six days a week.

Garrido heads District Council 37, the city’s largest municipal employees union.

Garrido heads District Council 37, the city’s largest municipal employees union.

The capital spending request constitutes 1% of the city’s ten-year Capital Plan, leading Garrido to remark, “Imagine, 1 percent for the 99 percent.”

The Mayor’s proposed 2016 budget did not include the capital funds requested.

Protesters said that libraries were vital spaces for New Yorkers that served as community centers and provided resources for millions of patrons that were especially helpful to seniors, immigrants and working-class families.

“For many immigrant communities, our libraries are the lifelines,” said Luis Feliz, lead organizer at advocacy group La Fuente, who hails originally from the Dominican Republic.

The systems report that more than 37 million visitors citywide visited branches last year – topping sporting events, museums, gardens and zoos combined.

But city funding has been cut by nearly 20 percent, and library staff has been reduced by more than 1,000 workers over the past decade.

“The libraries have been starving long enough,” added DC 37 member Julio Hernández.

“The libraries have been starving long enough,” added DC 37 member Julio Hernández.

“Annoyingly, we are in the same dance,” said John Hyslop, President of the Local 1321 Queens Library Guild, in reference to the consistent demands for funding since the original budget cuts. He urged residents to be pro-active and to call 311 to demand funding be restored.

“The libraries have been starving long enough,” added DC 37 member Julio Hernández.

Under current financial strictures, libraries are struggling to do more with less, said advocates.

“There are fewer resources and more demand,” said Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a center for the study of the African-American and African Diaspora experience. It is part of the New York Public Library System.

“We have a workforce that does life-saving work every day,” said Muhammad. “Without adequate staffing, they will not be able to meet the needs of New Yorkers.”

“There is not enough staff to do all the things we want to do,” argued Lauren Comito, Director of Operations for Urban Librarians Unite (ULU), an advocacy group of urban library professionals. “We could do so much more.”

“We have to invest in our libraries,” said Councilmember Margaret Chin.

“We have to invest in our libraries,” said Councilmember Margaret Chin.

“For decades, our libraries have been at the frontlines of ending inequality by giving millions of patrons the skills they need to uplift themselves out of poverty and empower generations of New Yorkers,” said Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer, Chair of the Cultural Affairs and Libraries Committee. “This fight is about dignity.”

The rally was part of a coordinated campaign that has included prominent voices such as writers Junot Díaz and Judy Blume lending their voices in support.

Also, over 15,000 letters from New Yorkers across all five boroughs calling for expanded service were also delivered to City Hall, and hundreds called their Councilmembers in support of a full budget restoration.

Those present expressed optimism that their concerns would be heard.

“I just hope that the mayor listens to the people,” said DC 37 member Jameen Sheppard. “Libraries provide a service that is much needed.”

For more information on the ongoing campaign, please visit www.investinlibraries.org.

 

Lucha en primera línea

Historia y fotos por Mónica Barnkow

“The libraries have been starving long enough,” added DC 37 member Julio Hernández.

“Las bibliotecas han estado muertas de hambre suficientemente”, agregó Julio Hernández, miembro de DC 37.

Un corte en el corazón.

Eso es lo que los defensores que se reunieron el pasado viernes 15 de mayo dicen que los recortes de fondos a tres sistemas de bibliotecas públicas de la ciudad constituyen para los millones de habitantes que dependen de sus servicios.

Los tres sistemas de la ciudad son la Biblioteca Pública de Brooklyn, la Biblioteca de Queens y la Biblioteca Pública de Nueva York (NYPL por sus siglas en inglés), que brindan servicio a Manhattan, el Bronx y Staten Island.

Representantes de los tres sistemas, funcionarios electos y aliados se reunieron en el Ayuntamiento para exigir que el Ayuntamiento y el alcalde de Blasio restablezcan el recorte de $65 millones de dólares en financiamiento.

“Las bibliotecas son el corazón de nuestras comunidades”, dijo el director ejecutivo del Consejo del Distrito 37, Henry Garrido. “Pero los recortes presupuestales desde la recesión han reducido los servicios y las horas, y las obras de infraestructura que se necesitan desesperadamente fueron pospuestas”.

El Consejo del Distrito 37 es el sindicato de empleados municipales más grande la ciudad, con 121,000 trabajadores municipales, incluidos los de las bibliotecas de la ciudad.

The campaign included signed letters.

La campaña incluyó cartas firmadas.

A raíz de la recesión de 2008, la administración Bloomberg cortó los fondos para los sistemas de bibliotecas. Desde 2009, la ciudad ha reducido el financiamiento en casi una quinta parte.

A pesar del posterior crecimiento en los ingresos de la ciudad, y el aumento de las tasas de asistencia, los fondos no han sido restaurados a los niveles pre-crisis.

Por otra parte, en el presupuesto del 2016 presentado por el alcalde Bill de Blasio, los tres sistemas perdieron aproximadamente $10 millones en sus presupuestos operativos.

En 2015, los tres sistemas recibieron $323 millones de dólares, los cuales incluyen $5 millones del Ayuntamiento en fondos operativos; este año, se asignaron sólo $313 millones.

The rally was held at City Hall.

El mitin se llevó a cabo en el Ayuntamiento.

Además, los partidarios han solicitado $1.4 mil millones en fondos de capital para mejoras de infraestructura y mantenimiento, y facilitar la expansión de los servicios en todas las sucursales a seis días a la semana.

La solicitud de los gastos de capital constituye el 1% del Plan de Capital de diez años de la ciudad, lo que lleva a Garrido a comentar: “Imaginen, 1 por ciento para el 99 por ciento”.

El presupuesto para 2016 propuesto por el alcalde no incluyó los fondos de capital requeridos.

Los manifestantes dijeron que las bibliotecas son espacios vitales para los neoyorquinos, que sirven como centros comunitarios y proporcionan recursos para millones de clientes, especialmente útiles para las personas mayores, los inmigrantes y las familias de la clase trabajadora.

John Hyslop, President of the Queens Library Guild, urged residents to be pro-active.

John Hyslop, presidente de Queens Library Guild, instó a los residentes a ser proactivos.

“Para muchas comunidades de inmigrantes, nuestras bibliotecas son salvavidas”, dijo Luis Feliz, organizador principal del grupo de defensa La Fuente, quien es originario de la República Dominicana.

Los sistemas informan que más de 37 millones de visitantes de toda la ciudad asistieron a las sucursales el año pasado, encabezando eventos deportivos, museos, jardines y zoológicos combinados.

Pero el financiamiento de la ciudad se ha reducido en casi un 20 por ciento, y el personal de la biblioteca se ha reducido en más de 1,000 trabajadores en la última década.

“Fastidiosamente, estamos en la misma danza”, dijo John Hyslop, presidente de Local 1321 Queens Library Guild, en referencia a las demandas constantes de financiamiento desde los recortes presupuestales originales. Instó a los residentes a ser proactivos y llamar al 311 para pedir que sea restaurado el financiamiento.

“Las bibliotecas han estado muertas de hambre”, agregó Julio Hernández, miembro de DC 37.

Bajo las restricciones financieras actuales, las bibliotecas están luchando para hacer más con menos, dijeron los activistas.

“There are fewer resources and more demand,” said Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

“Hay menos recursos y más demanda”, dijo Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director del Centro Schomburg para la Investigación de la Cultura Negra.

“Hay menos recursos y más demanda”, dijo Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director del Centro Schomburg para la Investigación de la Cultura Negra, un centro para el estudio de la experiencia afro-americana y la diáspora africana. Es parte del Sistema de Bibliotecas Públicas de Nueva York.

“Tenemos una fuerza laboral que trabaja para salvar vidas todos los días”, dijo Muhammad. “Sin el personal adecuado, no van a ser capaces de satisfacer las necesidades de los neoyorquinos”.

“No hay suficiente personal para hacer todas las cosas que queremos hacer”, argumentó Lauren Comito, directora de Operaciones de Bibliotecarios Urbanos Unidos (ULU por sus siglas en inglés), un grupo de defensa de los profesionales de las bibliotecas urbanas. “Podríamos hacer mucho más”.

“Durante décadas, las bibliotecas han estado a la vanguardia de poner fin a la desigualdad, dando a millones de clientes las habilidades que necesitan para salir de la pobreza y empoderar a generaciones de neoyorquinos”, dijo el concejal Jimmy Van Bramer, presidente de la Comisión de Asuntos Culturales y del Comité Bibliotecas. “Esta pelea es sobre la dignidad”.

El mitin fue parte de una campaña coordinada que ha incluido voces prominentes como los escritores Junot Díaz y Judy Blume prestando sus voces en apoyo.

The writer has lent his support.

El escritor presta su apoyo.

Además, más de 15,000 cartas de neoyorquinos de los cinco condados solicitando servicio ampliado también fueron entregadas al Ayuntamiento, y cientos llamaron a sus concejales en apoyo a la restauración complete del presupuesto.

Los presentes se mostraron optimistas de que sus preocupaciones serían escuchadas.

“Sólo espero que el alcalde escuche a la gente”, dijo Jameen Sheppard, miembro de DC 37. “Las bibliotecas proporcionan un servicio que es muy necesario”.