Forced, not Fair
Forzado, no justo

  • English
  • Español

Forced, not Fair

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

“Forced arbitration needs to be stopped,” said Danny.

“Forced arbitration needs to be stopped,” said Danny.

They call it the “rip-off” clause.

New York lawmakers and worker advocates rallied in midtown Manhattan on May 18 to protest the practice of forced arbitration by large corporations, which they said exploits low-income workers and consumers.

In forced arbitration, a company requires a worker or costumer to agree up front to resolve any problem through an arbitration process, waiving their right to go to court. This severely limits the recourse workers have if the company commits fraud, wage theft, discrimination or other abuse.

Advocates slammed this practice as the “rip-off clause,” stating that most workers are forced to sign paperwork at time of hire, waiving their legal rights.

The group staged its rally outside of a Wells Fargo branch on Madison Avenue, and criticized the bank for forcing victims of its 2016 account scandal, in which Wells Fargo opened millions of deposit and credit card accounts without customer permission, to resolve claims against the bank through arbitration.

Protestors gathered in midtown.

Protestors gathered in midtown.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer, who attended the rally, said new legislative proposals in Albany would help ensure companies like Wells Fargo stop taking advantage of the public.

Deborah Axt, Co-Director of Make the Road New York (MRNY), explained that most workers, many of them immigrants who might have limited understanding of English, are not even aware of what they are signing.

“You never even think twice, you certainly don’t understand the fine print, nor do you have an option of not signing,” remarked Axt. “You need the job, or you need the credit card, you’re going to sign it. And then something terrible happens. And then when you find an attorney, you find that you have no meaningful path to enforce your rights.”

At the rally, advocates were joined by Assemblymembers Latoya Joyner and Brian Kavanagh, New York State Senator Brad Hoylman, Public Advocate Letitia James and Stringer.

Joyner, Kavanagh and Hoylman announced that they will introduce state legislation to would extend the reach of public enforcement of worker and consumer protections.

The EmPIRE (Empowering People in Rights Enforcement) Worker Protection Act would seek to extend the reach of public enforcement of worker and consumer protections, in an effort to account for the fact that forced arbitration is decimating workers’ and consumers’ ability to access the courts in the face of wage theft, discrimination, fraud and exploitation.

“It will allow people to enforce their private right to labor dispute,” said Joyner. “This will give them access to the courts, rather than only have their case in front of an arbitrator.”

“We have to do everything we can to protect workers,” said Assemblymember Latoya Joyner.

“We have to do everything we can to protect workers,” said Assemblymember Latoya Joyner.

“It’s important to remember that the arbiter is usually someone who is selected by the company,” said James.

“Arbitration by nature is a closed-door procedure, a closed-door process that lacks transparency,” James stated. “Forced arbitration perpetuates an unjust system.”

James said she is introducing two bills in the City Council — one that would require any business that deals with the city to clearly disclose whether they subject workers to forced arbitration, and another that would prohibit businesses using forced arbitration clauses in employee contracts from receiving financial assistance or contracts from the city.

Worker Danny said he was hired by Macy’s in Douglaston, Queens and worked as a sales associate for more than six months, earning recognition for job performance.

However, he said he was abruptly fired, with Macy’s stating that he was terminated due to a prior conviction seven years earlier.

“I divulged all of that when I was hired, yet they allowed me to work there for over six months,” said Danny, who explained that he sought help from an attorney, but was unable to take Macy’s to court for discrimination.

“I hadn’t known that when I went for the job, I signed a forced arbitration agreement, which I had no idea about,” he said.

“Forced arbitration needs to be stopped,” he added. “This leaves the average worker pretty much screwed. My quest to find a meaningful job, I thought I had found it, and it was taken away from me.”

“We have to do everything we can at this point to protect workers,” Joyner said. “The state has done many advancements such as paid family leave, raising the minimum wage, but if we’re denying people their right in court, I think we’re doing an even greater disservice.”

“We’ve got to expose the people who are not good advocates,” said City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

“We’ve got to expose the people who are not good advocates,” said City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Cavanaugh said that consumers are exploited by forced arbitration as much as employees.

“This issue is not just an issue with employment contracts,” he said. “The time you are most likely to sign a forced arbitration agreement is when you’re buying goods or services in this state.”

The group staged its rally outside of a Wells Fargo branch on Madison Avenue, and criticized the bank for forcing victims of its 2016 account scandal, in which Wells Fargo opened millions of deposit and credit card accounts without customer permission, to resolve claims against the bank through arbitration.

Stringer said the proposed bills would help level ensure companies like Wells Fargo stopped taking advantage of the public.

“We’ve got to expose the people who are not good advocates,” Stringer remarked. “The best antidote to bad corporate practice is a strong legislative agenda.”

In response to the protest, Wells Fargo issued the following statement: “Our number one priority is to make things right for our customers. Arbitration is a fair, efficient and effective forum available for a customer to pursue a legal claim and resolve a legal dispute through an impartial third-party. Arbitration clauses are commonly included in customer agreements at financial institutions and businesses in other industries, and offer benefits to both the business and the consumer. By resolving legal disputes through arbitration, both the consumer and the business have the ability to reach a positive resolution at a lower cost.”

Workers criticized the practice.

Workers criticized the practice.

The protest coincided with the release of report by the Center for Popular Democracy, titled Justice for Sale: How Corporations Use Forced Arbitration Agreements to Exploit Working Families, which stated that workers in forced arbitration cases win only about 20 percent of the time, with median damage awards of around $36,500, compared to $176,000 in federal court employment discrimination cases and $85,600 in state court.

The report also indicated that in cases related to credit card opening, consumers win arbitration cases only about 6 percent of the time.

“This [new] legislation is critical to be able to boost the reach of the public enforcement,” said Axt. “We’re not letting bad actor corporations and employers get away with murder just because they’re convinced their consumers and employers to sign away their rights to go to court.”

Forzado, no justo

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh.

El asambleísta Brian Kavanagh.

Lo llaman la cláusula de “estafa”.

Los legisladores de Nueva York y los defensores de los trabajadores se reunieron en el centro de Manhattan el 18 de mayo para protestar contra la práctica del arbitraje forzado por las grandes corporaciones, que según ellos explotan a trabajadores y consumidores de bajos ingresos.

En el arbitraje forzoso, una empresa requiere que un trabajador o cliente se ponga de acuerdo por adelantado para resolver cualquier problema mediante un proceso de arbitraje, renunciando a su derecho a acudir a los tribunales. Esto limita severamente el recurso que tienen los trabajadores si la empresa comete fraude, robo de salarios, discriminación u otros abusos.

Los defensores criticaron ferozmente esta práctica como la “cláusula de estafa”, afirmando que la mayoría de los trabajadores están obligados a firmar papeleo en el momento de la contratación, renunciando a sus derechos legales.

Most workers sign at time of hire.

La mayoría de los trabajadores firman papeleo en el momento de la contratación.

El grupo organizó su manifestación afuera de una sucursal de Wells Fargo en la avenida Madison y criticó al banco por forzar a las víctimas de su escándalo de cuentas de 2016, en el cual Wells Fargo abrió millones de cuentas de depósitos y tarjetas de crédito sin permiso del cliente para resolver demandas contra el banco mediante arbitraje.

“[This] perpetuates an unjust system,” said Public Advocate Letitia James.

“[Esto] perpetúa un sistema injusto”, dijo la defensora pública Letitia James

El Contralor de la Ciudad, Scott Stringer, quien asistió al mitin, dijo que las nuevas propuestas legislativas en Albany ayudarían a asegurar que compañías como Wells Fargo dejen de aprovecharse del público.

Deborah Axt, codirectora de Make the Road New York (MRNY), explicó que la mayoría de los trabajadores, muchos de ellos inmigrantes que podrían tener una comprensión limitada del inglés, no son conscientes de lo que están firmando.

“No lo piensan dos veces, ciertamente no entienden la letra pequeña, ni tienen la opción de no firmar”, comentó Axt. “Necesitan el trabajo o la tarjeta de crédito y firman, y entonces sucede algo terrible. Y luego, cuando encuentran a un abogado, descubren que no tienen un camino significativo para hacer valer sus derechos”.

En la manifestación, a los defensores se les unieron los asambleístas Latoya Joyner y Brian Kavanagh, el senador por el estado de Nueva York Brad Hoylman, la defensora pública Letitia James y Stringer.

Joyner, Kavanagh y Hoylman anunciaron que presentarán una legislación estatal para ampliar el alcance de la aplicación pública de las protecciones de los trabajadores y los consumidores.

Workers criticized the practice.

Los trabajadores criticaron la práctica.

La Ley EmPIRE (Capacitar a las personas en aplicación de los derechos) de Protección al Trabajador buscaría de ampliar el alcance de la aplicación pública de protección de trabajadores y consumidores, en un esfuerzo por explicar el hecho de que el arbitraje forzado está diezmando la capacidad de los trabajadores y consumidores para tener acceso a los tribunales ante el robo de salarios, la discriminación, el fraude y la explotación.

“Permitirá a las personas hacer cumplir su derecho privado a la disputa laboral”, dijo Joyner. “Esto les dará acceso a los tribunales, en lugar de llevar su caso ante arbitraje”.

“Es importante recordar que el árbitro es generalmente alguien que es seleccionado por la compañía”, dijo James.

“El arbitraje por naturaleza es un procedimiento a puerta cerrada que carece de transparencia”, dijo James. “El arbitraje forzado perpetúa un sistema injusto”.

“We’ve got to expose the people who are not good advocates,” said City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

“Tenemos que exponer a las personas que no son buenas defensoras”, dijo el contralor de la ciudad, Scott Stringer.

Ella dijo que estará presentando dos proyectos de ley en el Ayuntamiento: uno que requeriría que cualquier negocio que trate con la ciudad revele claramente si somete a los trabajadores a arbitraje forzado y otro que prohibiría a las empresas usar cláusulas de arbitraje forzado en contratos de empleo y así evitar que reciban asistencia financiera o contratos de la ciudad.

El trabajador Danny dijo que fue contratado por Macy’s en Douglaston, Queens, y trabajó como asociado de ventas por más de seis meses, ganando reconocimiento por su desempeño laboral.

Sin embargo, dijo que fue despedido abruptamente, con Macy’s declarando que fue debido a una condena siete años antes.

“Lo divulgué todo cuando fui contratado y me permitieron trabajar allí por más de seis meses”, dijo Danny, quien explicó que buscó ayuda de un abogado, pero no pudo llevar a Macy’s a los tribunales por discriminación.

“Yo no sabía que cuando me obtuve el trabajo, firmé un acuerdo de arbitraje forzado, no tenía ni idea”, explicó.

“El arbitraje forzado necesita ser detenido”, agregó. “Esto deja al trabajador medio jodido. Inicié mi búsqueda para encontrar un trabajo significativo, pensé que lo había encontrado y me lo quitaron”.

“Tenemos que hacer todo lo posible en este momento para proteger a los trabajadores”, dijo Joyner. “El estado ha hecho muchos avances, como la licencia familiar pagada, aumentar el salario mínimo; pero si le negamos a la gente su derecho en la corte, creo que estaremos haciendo un mal servicio aún mayor”.

Cavanaugh dijo que los consumidores son explotados por el arbitraje forzado tanto como por los empleados.

“Este problema no es solo con los contratos de trabajo”, dijo. “El momento en que es más probable que firme un acuerdo de arbitraje forzado es cuando usted compra bienes o servicios en este estado”.

El grupo organizó su manifestación afuera de una sucursal de Wells Fargo en la avenida Madison y criticó al banco por forzar a las víctimas de su escándalo de cuentas de 2016, en el cual Wells Fargo abrió millones de cuentas de depósitos y tarjetas de crédito sin permiso del cliente para resolver demandas contra el banco a través de arbitraje.

“We have to do everything we can to protect workers,” said Assemblymember Latoya Joyner.

“Tenemos que hacer todo lo posible para proteger a los trabajadores”, dijo la asambleísta Latoya Joyner.

Stringer dijo que las propuestas de ley ayudarían a asegurar que empresas como Wells Fargo dejen de aprovecharse del público.

“Tenemos que exponer a la gente que no son buenos defensores”, comentó Stringer. “El mejor antídoto contra la mala práctica corporativa es una agenda legislativa fuerte”.

En respuesta a la protesta, Wells Fargo emitió la siguiente declaración: “Nuestra prioridad número uno es hacer las cosas bien para nuestros clientes. El arbitraje es un foro justo, eficiente y eficaz para que un cliente pueda presentar una demanda legal y resolver una disputa legal a través de un tercero imparcial. Las cláusulas de arbitraje se incluyen comúnmente en los acuerdos de clientes en las instituciones financieras y las empresas de otras industrias, y ofrecen beneficios tanto a la empresa como al consumidor. Al resolver los conflictos legales a través del arbitraje, tanto el consumidor como el negocio tienen la capacidad de alcanzar una resolución positiva a un costo menor”.

La protesta coincidió con la publicación del informe del Centro para la Democracia Popular, titulado Justicia a la venta: cómo las corporaciones utilizan acuerdos de arbitraje forzados para explotar a las familias trabajadoras, que establecía que los trabajadores en los casos de arbitraje forzoso ganan sólo un 20 por ciento de las veces, con compensaciones promedio por daños de alrededor de $36,500 dólares, en comparación con $176,000 dólares en casos de discriminación laboral en tribunales federales y $85,600 en tribunales estatales.

Protestors gathered in midtown.

Se reunieron los manifestantes frente a Wells Fargo.

El informe también indica que, en los casos relacionados con la apertura de tarjetas de crédito, los consumidores ganan los casos de arbitraje sólo un 6 por ciento de las veces.

“Esta [nueva] legislación es crítica para poder aumentar el alcance de la aplicación pública de la ley”, dijo Axt. “No vamos a dejar que las corporaciones y los empleadores de mala fe se salgan con la suya solo porque están convencidos de que sus consumidores y empleadores renunciarán a su derecho de ir a los tribunales”.