Decoding Encadenada
Descifrando Encadenada

  • English
  • Español

Decoding Encadenada

Story, photos and videos by Sherry Mazzocchi

“I had to start with the baby steps,” explained Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel, of deciphering historical Spanish language texts.

“I had to start with the baby steps,” explained Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel, of deciphering historical Spanish language texts.

Everyone knew Catalina Bravo was having an affair. Everyone, that is, except her husband.

Francisco Bravo left work early one day and found his wife’s bedroom door bolted from the inside. He bashed it open, and found her and her lover, who tried to flee through the window. Bravo, enraged, wounded the man before he escaped. His wife wasn’t so lucky.

The Bravos’ story sounds like a telenovela, but it was gleaned from historical documents at the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute (DSI). Reconstructing the story of Catalina Bravo, an early female Spanish settler in Hispaniola, has been Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel’s obsession.

Corniel is a research associate at the DSI and a City College professor. She read Bravo’s murder trial transcript to find out details about early women in the New World. It’s a 1,450-page document, handwritten in 16th-century Spanish.

It is an intimidating process for even the hardiest of Spanish language scholars.

Paleography, or deciphering historical manuscripts, is one of the most challenging hurdles historians face. That process is a lot easier, thanks to a new tool developed by the DSI.

The Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool allows anyone – not just scholars in PhD. Programs – to learn complex scripts.

Paleography skills are mainly taught in PhD programs. That knowledge disseminated to only a narrow band of scholars, said Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, Assistant Director of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute. “And amongst those, ethnic minority students are even a tinier fraction.”

The Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool is a new tool developed by the CUNY’s Dominican Studies Institute, and managed by Assistant Director Anthony Stevens-Acevedo.

The Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool is a new tool developed by the CUNY’s Dominican Studies Institute, and managed by Assistant Director Anthony Stevens-Acevedo.

The slow pipeline of young PhDs will take an eternity to get enough researchers to put a dent in the millions of documents that could reveal stories like Catalina Bravo’s, he said. The tool enables students learn paleography at an earlier part of their academic careers.

The tool is still in its early stages, said Stevens-Acevedo. DSI is also seeking to expand its capacities by partnering with other universities in the Caribbean and Latin America.

Corniel was part of the team that helped develop the tool. It was something she wished she had when she started studying the early history of the island.

“I had to start with the baby steps of paleography,” Corniel said. Colonial-era Spanish is a different language than what’s spoken today. Scholars need to learn the language and also link it to the writing. “It’s very difficult,” she said.

The difficulty is compounded by the different writing styles. “Because of that, you think you are running into a different language every time,” she said.

The site hosted by DSI, but it pertains to all Spanish paleography, said John O’Neill, Curator of Hispanic Society of America’s Library and Rare Books.

O’Neill taught paleography at City College and was also an advisor on the project. “You can teach yourself. I used to tell my students that you don’t really need me,” he said. “All you need is a good magnifying glass and all the patience in the world.”

For those who are not eternally patient, the tool is a huge time saver. “When you have a document in front of you that you don’t understand,” said Corniel, “sometimes you feel like you run yourself into a wall.”

“It’s not the Dominican Republic I know,” said Antonio Pérez, a graduate student at City College.

“It’s not the Dominican Republic I know,” said Antonio Pérez, a graduate student at City College.

DSI’s paleography website uses documents that have already been translated as teaching tools. Users highlights words, or even letters, for a translation. By constant exposure and comparison, students grasp the nuances of historical handwriting faster.

Cortesana and Encadenada are two types of script commonly used by Spanish scribes in the 16th century.

“Encadenada means linked,” said O’Neill. “You can see that it looks as if the pen never leaves the page at all—and really it doesn’t until they have to dip in to get more ink and then they start again. That is probably the most difficult hand there is to read.”

Back then, only a limited amount of people could read and write, said O’Neill. “It looks to us like works of art—but it was their normal daily practice.”

In addition to language and religion, Spain brought also brought bureaucracy to the New World, he said. Everything, including Bravo’s trial, was documented in detail. “They were mad bureaucrats so they made duplicate and triplicate copies of everything and sent it back to the he Archivo General de Indias in Spain.”

The DSI purchased papers from the Archivo General de Indias and now has a vast source of primary information about the earliest history of the age of exploration.

The documents have proven a source of surprises to everyone.

“It’s not the Dominican Republic I know,” said Antonio Pérez, a graduate student at City College. Pérez also worked on the project’s early stages.

“Encadenada means linked,” John O’Neill, Curator of Hispanic Society of America’s Library and Rare Books.

“Encadenada means linked,” John O’Neill, Curator of Hispanic Society of America’s Library and Rare Books.

Pérez is of Dominican descent, but learned mostly U.S. history in school. Many adults he knows call the Dominican Republic a place where they never want to return.

“It was a place we left for a reason,” he said.

Reading the documents shifted his feelings about the island. “It went from a place of no value to a place of rich history that should be explored.”

Even routine documents like a ship’s manifest are revealing.

“Seeing this grocery list with 50 black slaves—and they were mentioned next to things like vinegar—that was surprising,” Pérez said.

The primary source documents are full of secrets waiting to be told—especially about women. The 1549 trial Corniel analyzes describes Spanish women and black and native women as well. An early census of the island lists both Spanish and black women as business owners. “Many of them also own land,” she said.

The early findings are exciting for everyone.

“But I want to know more,” said Corniel. She wishes she had the paleography tool when she was a student. “But I have it now.”

For more information on CUNY’s Dominican Studies Institute, please visit http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/dsi/.

To visit with the DSI scholars, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_185.

Descifrando Encadenada

Historia, fotos y videos por Sherry Mazzocchi

"Tuve que comenzar con los pasos de bebé de la paleografía" explico la Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel.

“Tuve que comenzar con los pasos de bebé de la paleografía” explico la Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel.

Todo el mundo sabía que Catalina Bravo estaba teniendo un romance. Todo el mundo, excepto su marido.

Francisco Bravo salió del trabajo temprano un día y encontró la puerta del dormitorio de su esposa cerrada desde adentro. Él golpeó hasta abrirla y la encontró con su amante, quien trató de huir por la ventana. Bravo, furioso, hirió al hombre antes de que escapara. Su esposa no tuvo tanta suerte.

La historia de los Bravos suena como una telenovela, pero fue extraída de documentos históricos en el Instituto de Estudios Dominicanos de CUNY. La reconstrucción de la historia de Catalina Bravo, una mujer de los primeros colonos españoles de la Española, ha sido la obsesión de la Dra. Lissette Acosta Corniel.

Corniel es investigadora asociada en el DSI y profesora del City College. Leyó la transcripción del juicio por asesinato de Bravo para averiguar los detalles de las primeras mujeres en el Nuevo Mundo. Es un documento de 1,450 páginas escrito a mano en el español del siglo XVI. Es un proceso intimidante, incluso para el más robusto de los estudiosos del idioma español.

La paleografía, o descifrar manuscritos históricos, es uno de los obstáculos más difíciles que enfrentan los historiadores. Ese proceso es mucho más fácil, gracias a una nueva herramienta desarrollada por el DSI.

La herramienta digital de enseñanza y de aprendizaje de paleografía del español permite a cualquier persona – no sólo a los estudiosos en programas doctorales – aprender secuencias de escritura complejas.

Las habilidades paleográficas se enseñan principalmente en los programas de doctorado. Ese conocimiento se difunde sólo a un pequeño grupo de los estudiosos, dijo Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, director adjunto del Instituto de Estudios Dominicanos de CUNY. “Y entre ellos, los estudiantes de minorías étnicas son aún una fracción diminuta”.

La herramienta digital de enseñanza y de aprendizaje de paleografía del español permite a cualquier persona aprender secuencias de escritura complejas; es mantenida por Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, director adjunto del Instituto.

La herramienta digital de enseñanza y de aprendizaje de paleografía del español permite a cualquier persona aprender secuencias de escritura complejas; es mantenida por Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, director adjunto del Instituto.

Al lento egreso de jóvenes doctores les tomará una eternidad conseguir suficientes investigadores para estudiar los millones de documentos que podrían revelar historias como la de Catalina Bravo, dijo. Esta herramienta permite a los estudiantes aprender paleografía en una parte temprana de sus carreras académicas.

La herramienta se encuentra todavía en sus primeras etapas, dijo Stevens-Acevedo. DSI también está tratando de ampliar sus capacidades mediante asociaciones con otras universidades en el Caribe y América Latina.

Corniel fue parte del equipo que ayudó a desarrollar la herramienta. Era algo que ella deseó haber tenido cuando comenzó a estudiar la historia antigua de la isla.

“Tuve que comenzar con los pasos de bebé de la paleografía”, dijo Corniel. El español de la época colonial es una lengua diferente a lo que se habla hoy en día. Los académicos tienen que aprender el idioma y también vincularlo a la escritura. “Es muy difícil”, dijo.

La dificultad se agrava por los diferentes estilos de escritura. “Por eso, crees que te estás enfrentando a un idioma diferente cada vez”, dijo.

"No es la República Dominicana que conozco", dijo Antonio Pérez, un estudiante de posgrado en el City College.

“No es la República Dominicana que conozco”, dijo Antonio Pérez, un estudiante de posgrado en el City College.

El sitio es auspiciado por el Instituto de Estudios Dominicanos, pero pertenece a toda la paleografía española, dijo John O’Neill, conservador de la biblioteca y libros raros de la Hispanic Society of America.

O’Neill enseñó paleografía en el City College y fue también asesor en el proyecto. “Tú puedes aprender. Yo solía decirle a mis estudiantes que realmente no me necesitaban”, dijo. “Lo que necesitas es una buena lupa y toda la paciencia del mundo”.

Para aquellos que no son eternamente pacientes, la herramienta es un gran ahorro de tiempo. “Cuando tienes un documento frente a ti que no entiendes”, dijo Corniel, “a veces te sientes como si te dieras contra la pared”.

El sitio web de paleografía de DSI utiliza documentos que ya han sido traducidos como herramientas de enseñanza. Los usuarios resaltan palabras, o incluso letras, para una traducción. Por la constante exposición y comparación, los estudiantes comprenden los matices de la escritura histórica más rápidamente.

Cortesana y Encadenada son dos tipos de escritura de uso común por los escribanos españoles en el siglo XVI.

“Encadenada significa unida”, dijo O’Neill. “Se puede ver que parece como si la pluma nunca abandonara la página, y realmente no lo hace hasta que se tiene que conseguir más tinta y después se empieza de nuevo. Esta es probablemente la parte más difícil para leer”.

En aquel entonces sólo una cantidad limitada de personas sabían leer y escribir, dijo O’Neill. Para nosotros son como obras de arte, pero era su práctica diaria normal”.

Además de la lengua y la religión, España trajo también la burocracia al Nuevo Mundo, dijo. Todo, incluyendo el juicio de Bravo, se documentó en detalle. “Ellos eran burócratas locos por lo que hicieron duplicados y copias por triplicado de todo y lo devolvieron al Archivo de las Indias en España”.

El DSI compró papeles del Archivo de las Indias y ahora cuenta con una vasta fuente de información primaria acerca de la historia más antigua de la era de los exploradores. Los documentos son una fuente de sorpresas para todos.

“No es la República Dominicana que conozco”, dijo Antonio Pérez, un estudiante de posgrado en el City College. Pérez también trabajó en las primeras etapas del proyecto.

"Encadenada significa unida", dijo John O'Neill, conservador de la biblioteca y libros raros de la ‘Hispanic Society of America.’

“Encadenada significa unida”, dijo John O’Neill, conservador de la biblioteca y libros raros de la ‘Hispanic Society of America.’

Pérez es de ascendencia dominicana, pero aprendió principalmente la historia de Estados Unidos en la escuela. Muchos adultos que conoce llaman a la República Dominicana un lugar al que nunca quieren volver. “Un lugar que dejamos por una razón”, dijo.

La lectura de los documentos cambió sus sentimientos sobre la isla. “Pasó de un lugar de ningún valor, a uno de rica historia que debe ser explorado”.

Incluso los documentos rutinarios, como el manifiesto de un barco, son reveladores. “Al ver esta lista de comestibles con 50 esclavos negros, y que fueron mencionados junto a cosas como el vinagre, que fue una sorpresa”, dijo Pérez.

Las fuentes primarias están llenas de secretos esperando ser contados, en especial sobre las mujeres. El juicio de Corniel de 1549 describe a las mujeres españolas, negras e indígenas también. Un censo temprano de la isla enumera tanto a las mujeres españolas y negras como las dueñas de negocios. “Muchas de ellas también poseían la tierra”, dijo.

Los primeros resultados son muy interesantes para todo el mundo.

“Pero yo quiero saber más”, dijo Corniel. Ella hubiera deseado tener la herramienta de paleografía cuando era una estudiante. “Pero ahora la tengo”.

Para mas informacion sobre el Instituto de Estudios Dominicanos de CUNY, favor visite http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/dsi/.

Para visitar con los miembros del Instituto, favor visite http://bit.ly/MT_185.

Scroll To Top